Pioneer BD-ROM rips faster in enclosure than internally

vbimport

#1

I have a Pioneer BDC-207D BD-ROM that I use with MakeMKV for BD’s only.

When installed internally it would be pretty slow. The best it could do was slightly over 3x and would degrade to below 2x.

Sometimes a BD would be locked at 2x for the entire duration.

Just recently I decided to install the drive in my Vantec USB 2.0 5.25" enclosure and it has been performing a lot better in it.

At the beginning of a BD it would get to 3.5x in a matter of seconds and steadily increase to 5.2x. It stays at 5.2x for a bit then quickly reduces to 4.5x and ending at about 4.7x.

Is there any reason why this BD-ROM rips faster externally rather than internally?


#2

Hmmmm … a SATA vs. USB2 connection making a huge difference?

This behavior sounds very similar to my Samsung SE-506AB external bd-r player.

If I didn’t know any better, I would have thought there was a riplock mechanism at play. I was able to get my samsung external bdr drive to rip at 4x or 5x speed, with a certain sequence of commands. But if I didn’t do the sequence properly or fast enough, the samsung bdr drive would fall back to 2x speed.


#3

For ripping times on my samsung external bdr player, it would take around 1 hour+20 minutes to rip a 50 gig double-layer bluray disc at the slow 2x speed.

When I was able to get the samsung bdr player to rip at 4x or 5x speed, it would take around 50-55 minutes to rip an entire 50 gig double-layer bluray discs (approximately 24 million sectors). For shorter total sector lengths, the approximate rip time for 20 million sectors was around 45 minutes.

(This is what I can recall from memory).


#4

With the drive made into an external, what would have taken about 48 minutes to an hour to rip a Blu-ray, it takes only 20 to 28 minutes.

It’s ripping at about a GB per minute.

I basically go after the main movie part which, in the end, takes up only around 20 GB.


#5

On my Asus bluray-rom BC-12B1ST drive (which is a rebadged LG), it takes around 30 minutes to rip the entire undecrypted iso of a 50 gigabtye double-layer bluray disc (such as the Star Wars trilogy and prequel blurays). For a 25 gigabyte single-layer bluray disc, it takes around 10 minutes to rip the entire undecrypted iso.

These days I don’t bother ripping my blurays anymore with programs like makemkv, anydvd, dvdfab, etc … Now I just extract the entire undecrypted isos of every new bluray discs I buy, to check whether are any bad sectors due to manufacturing defects + lousy quality control. I’ve had to return a few blurays to the store, when I came across some random bad sectors which appeared to be in the middle of large m2ts files. When I played these defective discs on my standalone bluray player, it would typically skip and/or pixelize where these bad sectors are.


#6

I’ve been thinking of picking up a Pioneer internal bluray drive, largely to see how it differs from the behavior of my LG rebadged Asus BC-12B1ST drive. (Samsung and LiteOn don’t seem to be making internal bluray drives anymore. Their internal bluray drives seemed to have completely disappeared from the local computer stores).

But if this behavior is standard for an internal Pioneer bluray drive, then I don’t know.


#7

mattg, did the drive otherwise function normally? Did you ever get the chance to see if it could read or write a single layer DVD+R/-R at max speed? Or, if you have access to a BD-R burned on another device, see how that performs internally versus externally?


#8

[QUOTE=Albert;2767766]mattg, did the drive otherwise function normally? Did you ever get the chance to see if it could read or write a single layer DVD+R/-R at max speed? Or, if you have access to a BD-R burned on another device, see how that performs internally versus externally?[/QUOTE]

Is it possible for the bluray section of a drive to run completely independently and differently than the dvd section on the same drive, with very different behaviors? (ie. As if the bluray and dvd sections were designed by completely different groups of designers/engineers).

The example I’m thinking of is my my LG rebadged Asus BC-12B1ST drive. The bluray section doesn’t appear to be riplocked at all, but the dvd section is riplocked (on dvd discs with css encryption)


#9

[QUOTE=Albert;2767766]mattg, did the drive otherwise function normally? Did you ever get the chance to see if it could read or write a single layer DVD+R/-R at max speed? Or, if you have access to a BD-R burned on another device, see how that performs internally versus externally?[/QUOTE]

I haven’t used recordable discs in a long time. I don’t even remember the last time I did that.

I just use optical drives for ripping. The Pioneer for Blu-rays and an internal ASUS for CDs and DVDs