Physical Disc 'quality' of DVD-R

vbimport

#1

I’ve tried to search and I’ve read a fair few of the long threads but I’ve finally cracked and signed up because I just need to post a few questions. :confused:
I have this case (discussed here http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=131386) which has a load of those hanging wallet thingys. When I started to use these to store my DVD ‘backups’ they were fine and then after a few months I noticed that there were skips and jumps when playing them back again. I figured that I (or the girlfriend) might have been touching the ‘wrong’ side when putting them in and out of the sleeves so I started burning to 4200Mb instead of the normal DVD-5 capacity to give me a bigger dead zone round the edge of the disc. I’ve also tried burning at 4x or 2x instead of 8x but there doesn’t seem to be any difference.
As the above links says, there have been no reports of damage by actually inserting the DVD’s into the sleeves but I am still not convinced so onto the questions:

  1. Is there any damage I might be doing to the disc by using these sleeves, either by thumb prints / scratches? Should I bin the case?
  2. Are there are particular DVD-R which are more resilient to scratches or are there brands to avoid? Which DVDs should I choose for the future?
  3. Can you get some kind of laquour to spray on to make a DVD more resilient (like http://www.blankdiscshop.co.uk/acatalog/fixatives.html but for the recorded not printed side. Maveby something like http://www.plexusplasticcleaner.com/plexus.html)? What can I do to fix the DVDs I already have?
  4. Should I just buy a networked DVD player and a load of hard discs to remove the DVD-R from the loop completely? Should I give in?

Thanks In Advance :bow: and if I have missed anything obvious then take it easy on me. :flower:


#2
  1. It’s possible that the materials used to make the sleeves might be interacting with the disc in some manner. I have never seen any kind of proof that this does or doesn’t affect the discs. But just to be safe, I keep my more important discs in spindles or standard cases.

  2. There is a TDK brand of “armored” DVDR that is designed to be more scratch resistant.

  3. Never spray any kind of coating or laqueur on the disc. This has the potential to unbalance the disc and perhaps even damage the drive at high speeds. The chemicals might also interact with the polycarbonate.

  4. A networked, hard-drive based device sounds like a fine idea. I think that DVDR are best for archiving as opposed to constant physical use. So when I make my own DVD movies, I burn 2 copies (on different brand discs) to archive at 1 to put in the living room.


#3

I see where you are coming from with that. I think it shouldn’t be any chemical etching going on, more likely poor handling.

  1. There is a TDK brand of “armored” DVDR that is designed to be more scratch resistant.

Unfortunately they are (a) ferociously expensive and (b) not available in printable form. I had been using the Datawrite Titanium 8x but I am not more than 90% convinced it is anything other than PR spin.

  1. Never spray any kind of coating or laqueur on the disc. This has the potential to unbalance the disc and perhaps even damage the drive at high speeds. The chemicals might also interact with the polycarbonate.

Hmmm. I print directly on to the discs using a Canon Pixma MP780 and by no means are the print distributions symmetrical. I haven’t seen any increase in problems. What I might do is to burn a few discs, do a load of tests using Nero CD/DVD Speed, print the associated disc images to the DVDs, run the same tests again, spray the printed side with a sealant and run the tests for a final third time. If there is a marked increase in the jitter / increase in errors / decrease in read speed, I’ll have to think again. In any case, I’ll try to update people with my results.

  1. A networked, hard-drive based device sounds like a fine idea. I think that DVDR are best for archiving as opposed to constant physical use. So when I make my own DVD movies, I burn 2 copies (on different brand discs) to archive at 1 to put in the living room.

All I need is for Nero Digital to support the menu structures of the DVD and I’d be 100% with you. As it is, getting ~70 DVD-5’s onto a 300Gb disc would cost 100GBP as opposed to getting two 50x Datawrite Titanium (8x) “Full Face” Printable DVD-R for 22GBP or 100x Taiyo Yuden (8x) Full-Face Printables DVD-R for 41GBP just isn’t worth it. Maybe I should change job and go work for someone like Seagate or Western Digital for any staff discount :wink:


#4

Just what disks are you using at the moment? If you are using datawrite disks, that could very well explain why they are dying so quickly?

Try using a good brand, like verbatim or TY, or even TDK (CMC are pretty good for storage apparently) and burning them at the speed rated on the disk.


#5

I’m probably going to start another storm of controversy over this but I’m going ahead anyway.

I have two types of cases, a 200pc wallet labelled “Keeper” and 32pc Case Logic case. Now then, The sleeves in the “Keeper” wallets have some kind of backing material which is white in colour. The Case Logic one has backing material which is black. Both wallets are stored standing up vertically on their sides, so that the discs are not pressing down on each other.

Now then, I’ve noticed that some discs kept in the “Keeper” wallet have got a semi-transparent whitish coat on the writing side of discs, obviously an imprint from the backing material. The discs in the Case Logic case do not. The discs with the imprint on them are still readable somehow but it seems like they read slightly slower, as if the drive is having a harder time reading them.

It seems as if the backing material has somehow either melted off or chemicals from it have left that imprint. I have read the various posts on how heat can cause the plastic backing material to give off certain corrosive chemicals so I know that argument. I used to put discs which were still warm after a burn into the wallets. I’ve noticed that when I let the discs cool completely before putting them into the “Keeper” wallet, they have little or no imprints on them. So that’s one word of advice : make sure you let the discs cool off first before keeping them!

I’ve also found a way to remove the imprints. Using lighter fluid (Zippo or Ronsonol) and tissue, I managed to rub off the imprints. You have to rub quite hard and some brands of tissue paper are quite rough and will scratch the discs badly. See if your discs have some sort of imprint looking stuff on the recording side of the discs, if so, maybe you can clean it off as I have. Try on some fairly unimportant disc first, though just in case it damages your discs. Mine work fine after cleaning but it is better just to be safe.

Oh yes, and so it also seems it matters what wallet you buy. Needless to say, stay away from the “Keeper” wallets I have used. They are quite cheap which is why I bought them. The Case Logic ones are bloody expensive; but they seem to be safe.


#6

One problem here is that there is no “control group”. It’s not like the ones that are stored in the sleeves are prone to problems and the ones that are stored in some other way are ok. This makes it difficult to say for sure that it’s really the storage case is the actual problem.