Philips's ASPI Instrument Applicator

vbimport

#1

Hi.

Is somebody here who has this service tool? It’s specially designed for Philips Nexperia based drives to align OPU and PWB together. Useful if you replace the defective OPU66 with a new one.


#2

I don’t think you’ll find a copy. Are you sure it is for the Nexperia-based drives?

The drive shown in the screenshot is a [I]really [/I]old model (c.2003, 4x?) and appears to pre-date the first Nexperia models (although it may use an earlier Philips chipset). Also, the reported read offset looks wrong for a Nexperia.

Which drive model are you trying to repair? Some of the later, better designed drives from other manufacturers can work very well with incorrect calibration data after a change of OPU (e.g. PX-716, PX-755/760). I don’t recall if anyone around here has tried it with a Benq. But I would be inclined to give it a try with a DW1640/1650 (and probably a DW1600/1620 also).

Czary2mary1 has much experience repairing drives.


#3

Yes, I’m sure of that. It’s definitely for Nexperia based drives, as the pictures were taken from service manual of Philips DVD8301 drive, which according to schematics uses PNX7850+TZA1047+TZA1042+OPU66.20 combination. When paired with OPU66.30 the PNX7850 can support write speeds of up to 8x but this drive uses earlier generation OPU66.20 and can only support 4x write speed.
How do you know the read offset from the picture? It shows nothing about offset.


#4

Also the version of this Applicator software is 2.85.00. Philips must have developed later versions to support their newer generations of the Nexperia drives, which use PNX7860, PNX7862, PNX7866, and even for PNX7869(BD).
This tool provides many tuning and measurement functions of Nexperia based drives. Since these drives were out of production many years ago, I really hope Benq or Philips could open this tool for general public, just as what Liteon did. They released their internal LtnFlash and KProbe.


#5

Please don’t confuse HP dvd writer 300n with 300c. 300c is a rebadged Benq drive based on Nexperia, while 300n is actually NEC ND 1100A. The first picture shows a HP 300c drive.


#6

[QUOTE=sanyolc;2785259]Please don’t confuse HP dvd writer 300n with 300c. 300c is a rebadged Benq drive based on Nexperia, while 300n is actually NEC ND 1100A. The first picture shows a HP 300c drive.[/QUOTE]
I didn’t. (Who said anything about NEC?)

My understanding is that the first Nexperia-based DVD writers were the DW800A series. Some earlier drives used Philips chipsets, but I don’t recall them ever being publically branded as Nexperia. In any case, these earlier 4x & 8X drives certainly don’t have the features we associate with the DW8xx & DW16xx Nexperia drives.

Regarding the offset, I just looked it up in database. It is a quick and, when interpreted correctly, pretty reliable way of identifying which chipset a drive uses.

The HP 300c is +1292 and all of the ‘real’ Nexperia-based drives I can think of have an offset of +618 (including the super rare SPD7000P Blu-ray writer). As +1292 is not a multiple of +618 (but we know from other sources that these are Philips-based drives), we can reasonably conclude that it is a substantially different chipset family.

[QUOTE=sanyolc;2785259]Philips must have developed later versions to support their newer generations of the Nexperia drives[/QUOTE]
Only if the drives needed them. A drive which could, at least in part, be self-calibrating would be much cheaper to produce. Paying humans to run the software through all those tests for every drive manufactured would have been very expensive.

[QUOTE=sanyolc;2785259]Since these drives were out of production many years ago, I really hope Benq or Philips could open this tool for general public, just as what Liteon did. They released their internal LtnFlash and KProbe.[/QUOTE]
Lite-On didn’t release these tools. They were developed and released (concurrently with the drives they are intended for) by Lite-On employees.


#7

No. Chipset has nothing to do with read/write offsets. VAD8031 and 300c all use PNX7850 chipset, according to schematics in the service manual.
The first Nexperia based drives were 400A series, not 800A


#8

Please do not conclude so fast. Thinking it to be “reliable” does not necessarily mean it is actually a realiable way. Please see this thread, http://club.myce.com/f61/dvd8031-hp-dvd-300c-68372/. HP 300c is indeed the same as DVD8031(VAD8031), which uses PNX7850 and of course belong to the Nexperia family.


#9

By the way how do you also know that your source of read/write offset is reliable? Maybe the listed offset is also incorrect. Apart from that I also don’t think it a reliable to identify chipset by using read/write offset.


#10

[QUOTE=sanyolc;2785314]No. Chipset has nothing to do with read/write offsets. [/QUOTE]
Incorrect. The chipset is the primary factor regarding the offset.

[QUOTE=sanyolc;2785316]By the way how do you also know that your source of read/write offset is reliable? Maybe the listed offset is also incorrect. Apart from that I also don’t think it a reliable to identify chipset by using read/write offset.[/QUOTE]
Take a look for yourself and see if you spot a pattern.

http://www.accuraterip.com/driveoffsets.htm

There are a few obvious incorrect entries (other software can interfere with the detection process), but they are easy enough to spot. One can also make a judgement based on the number of entries submitted is recorded.

The similarity in the naming of the integrated circuit components is surely an even less accurate indication of how two chipsets relate to each other.

[QUOTE=Ibex;2785203]
Which drive model are you trying to repair?[/QUOTE]
It is unreasonable to expect people to attempt to assist without knowing. But if you prefer to bicker then you’re on your own.


#11

Sorry, but I’m already on my own as you have provided nothing useful but misleading information. According to TDB’s firmware site http://archive.rpc1.org/tdb/ the HP DVD Writer 300c is OEM BENQ DW400A which uses Nexperia PNX7850E chipset. Of course it belongs to Nexperia family.
Philips earlier generation of DVD chipset is called MACE, and its part number is SAA7830. MACE is only used in consumer DVD recorders and no computer drive design is based on MACE.
So I have to kindly inform you that it is a rather unreliable way to identify the chipset of a drive by its offset. Just call it “primary factor” doesn’t mean it is actually the primary factor.
I submitted this thread only to ask for this tool. If you don’t have it why bicker with some incorrect info?