People want 3DTV, but don't like high prices or glasses

vbimport

#1

People want 3DTV, but don’t like high prices or glasses.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/09/ozidnP.jpg[/newsimage]A new report released last week by The Nielsen Company and the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing has shown that while the consumer market definitely has an interest in the technology, there are a number of factors, including cost and those pesky 3D glasses, which are turning them away from embracing the products.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/people-want-3dtv-but-dont-want-to-pay-for-it-or-wear-glasses-34342/](http://www.myce.com/news/people-want-3dtv-but-dont-want-to-pay-for-it-or-wear-glasses-34342/)


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#2

Here’s something you probably don’t know.

  1. Sony 3D TV’s have multiple IR transmitters on the TV. 3D Glasses have the sensor at the front, and are directional, and only pick up 3D operating signals when staring directly at the TV. Even if there is a second 3D TV operating beside it, the glasses only operate for 1 TV. The sony glasses block all light sources beside the glasses, and peripheral vision.

  2. Samsung glasses - Have the infrared receiver at the top, at one side. Means it picks up it’s signalling from every Samsung 3D TV in the room, Panasonic TV’s across the room, Sony TV’s nearby, IR from incandescent light globes, Halogens (non IR filtered) lamps, Sunlight streaming through windows, Compact Fluorescent/fluorescent luminaire, Metal Halide luminaire … I’m pretty sure that humans emit some IR light too - and the goddamn things flicker, switch between 2D and 3D mode constantly and give you such a terrible experience, you’d bet better off without it :iagree: The glasses are flimsy & easily broken, have no"ON/Off switch" or indicators to suggest they are working (they weren’t charged when I walked in - but I plugged them into the USB/USB micro cables hanging ungraciously from the TV’s). The glasses are extremely spartan, meaning they have no sides to block light/glare/bright lights within your peripheral vision, and overall, I’d never buy a freaking Samsung 3DTV if my life depended on it. Ok, I would if my life depended on it, but I’d ebay it is soon as I got it home.

While I hate Sony, they’ve got an infinately better IR 3DTV system than Samsung. After 5 minutes, the Sony glasses feel like a bowling ball resting on nose, and they grip the back of your head tightly, like a vice grip :iagree: giving you a headache, whether you’re watching the TV or not.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t test the Panasonics, because some unruly idiot child went around and broke all the glasses in the showroom shortly before I arrived to see him breaking the panny glasses, except 1 pair of samsungs, and the Sony’s, which were tucked away behind the Sony TV’s.

I could have tried using the samsung glasses, upside down, on the panasonic, however, they’d been secured to a pedestal with a short security wire, and I unless I squatted down, or got down on the floor, I couldn’t see the panasonic TV using the glasses.

I have my dignity though … I wasn’t that excitable.

3DTV with 3D Glasses sucks.

I wouldn’t pay for the priviledge of being a part of the grand 3D sucking at this point in time - and I’m a nerd and love 3D.

I might continue the spiel after the store I’m doing the 3DTV area review for concludes :iagree: