PC Temperature and PSU

vbimport

#1

Hi Guys,
I have managed to do all the temperature settings correctly with Motherboard Monitor 5,using the help file of course,and observed the temp.

And I can say that I have some high temperatures:

  1. The Red one “CPU” - around 75c
  2. The Blue one - around 65c
  3. The black one - around 40c

My PC is 5 years old and the Motherboard is Matsonic MS 9007Cm, (SiSoft Sandra says: i845 ITM 8712)and I think that it only has 1 fan(I am not 100% sure if I am correct about this).In MBM 5 I set it to display all the 3 fans in the dashboard, but it only displays 1.

Other info:
Windows XP SP1
Intel Pentium 4 Processor 1,5 GHz
512 MB SDRAM
Ge Force FX 5200 - new.
Power Supply - 250W.

My previous Graphic card,Ge Force FX 5200 also,died only after 3 months. - It was very hot while the PC was working.
The new one is a bit cooler, but still warm,of course.

Do you think that the high temperature was the reason for my previous Graphic card to die?
And should I buy a new Power Supply? Maybe 350 W?

I really wanted your advice mates,Thanks
Pavle :slight_smile:


#2

I’m not sure how accurate MBM5 reports the temperature since it didn’t work for me at all before. But a new, beefier power supply is a good start to supply enough “juice” to have your components operate comfortably. Getting a power suppy from a reputable manufacturer is worth the extra cost.

You can still get a PSU with a native 20-pin ATX main plug if you like. But if you plan on upgrading / rebuilding a new system, most of them will need a native 24-pin ATX main plug, which is backward compatible with the 20-pin.


#3

It’s really hard to tell what caused your graphics card to fail (I’m quite sure it was under warranty, right?), but intensive heat is never good for computer hardware. My advice is to get some casefans (at least 2: one in the front as intake, 1 in the back as outtake) and maybe another PSU too. If your system is stable with that 250W PSU, you could just be fine, but I don’t think there’s much headroom for adding components. Also, if your PSU always runs at (almost) full power, it will most likely become quite hot and heat your case too.