PC Magazine responds to music industry complaint letter

vbimport

#1

PC Magazine responds to music industry complaint letter.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/11/UxvWGA.jpg[/newsimage]“How did we end up being the music industry's scapegoat, and what do we think about it?” This is the sentence that begins PC Magazine’s open response to the music industry’s scathing letter criticizing their coverage of P2P services to check out when Limewire was shut down.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/pc-magazine-responds-to-music-industry-complaint-letter-37194/](http://www.myce.com/news/pc-magazine-responds-to-music-industry-complaint-letter-37194/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

“It’s time for these music execs to pull their collective heads out of the sand and fully acknowledge and accept all the ways their industry has changed,” Ulanoff proclaims. “They also have to understand that nothing will stop technology’s inexorable march forward. Things will continue to change. Music downloads and sharing will never go away.”

Out of the sand? I would think their heads are stuck somewhere far darker and far more arromatic.


#3

if it wasn’t for advances in technology, the music industry and others wouldn’t be using cd and dvd now. they would still be supplying their content on records and videos. strange how it is ok when it suits but not ok when it doesn’t, isn’t it. they are in the position they are because of their own stupid, backwards attitude. they want to maintain control. the supposed losses are an excuse to try to keep that control, encouraging governments to make/change laws accordingly. had they realised what the future was going to be, they could have adapted much earlier, jumping on the ‘band wagon’ (no pun intended) and keeping up with technology whilst making even more money than they had been. they were too slow to do that and are paying the price. serves them right! still no reason to condemn others because of their own lack of foresight. as stated above, file sharing will not stop. they need to embrace it and give customers what they want, how they want. the reporting of alternative methods by which customers can get things isn’t a crime. not giving a method of their own to compete is the crime.


#4

The Hollywood industries are like a nagging ex-wife. They just don’t get that you that the price of getting in bed with them is way too high. Now someone please send them home to daddy…


#5

The RIAA can shove it.


#6

Mad props to PCMag for their reply.


#7

[QUOTE=olddancer;2560544]“It’s time for these music execs to pull their collective heads out of the sand and fully acknowledge and accept all the ways their industry has changed,” Ulanoff proclaims. “They also have to understand that nothing will stop technology’s inexorable march forward. Things will continue to change. Music downloads and sharing will never go away.”

Out of the sand? I would think their heads are stuck somewhere far darker and far more arromatic.[/QUOTE]

^This.

On to other things.
I’ve said what I’ve needed to say a million times.
The RIAA takes things way to serious.
What happens when you put to arrogant bastards in one room that have a different opinion on lets say, a TV show?
It gets ugly, But what happens if we put two laid back guys in one room who have a different view on a TV show?
They have a conversation.
What I’m saying is that if the RIAA was more understanding and actually lowered prices on music today, there would be a lot less theft.
Most people who do Pirate music aren’t exactly Gene Simmons.

If the RIAA thinks that if they lower the price people still won’t pay, then they are dead wrong. I can tell that someone wouldn’t want to have music theft on their minds.