Partitioning

Are there any down sides to partitioning a HDD.

I am intending to format my 80GB in 3 Partitions, of unequal size - one for my mp3s and vid. clips, one for CD/DVD image files , and the last for windows and program files.

I also intend to use differ files systems (out of FAT 32 and NTFS) but i will only have one OS installed altogether

I highly recommend Partition Magic, it’ll let you change your mind without starting over. Be sure to give the OS several extra GB. Since you’re starting fresh, there’s no reason not to partition and many reasons to do so…

i cant really afford any new software.

i think i am going to arange the free space as follows

10 GB for mp3+vid clips
20GB for OS and Program files
50GB for Images

Any comments?

Yes, you can still get PM version 6 or 7, they run around $20-25 US and DriveImage 2002 will also do basic partitioning tasks.
Anyway, 20GB should be plently for OS and proggies.

Since you already have a 120 Gig HD, Im assuming you’ve got your OS (Win XP) installed when you are partitioning. In this case Win XP itself can handle all your partitioning needs.

I use Win2K and the Disk Management provided is more than useful. Since you’ve already invested in an (able) OS, why invest again in a partition manager? Think again. All the FS you require (FAT, FAT 32 and NTFS) can be handled by Win XP.

Also you missed out creating a vital partition - the swap partition. The swap partition should always be on your non-Windows-sys files disk. Put a fixed swap file here. This is of course if you haven’t disabled virtual memory - which is any way not recommended for systems < 1024 MB of RAM.

i have no idea what swap files are, or how i should save them - i’m no expert!

BTW, my HDD model is 120GXP but that doesn’t mean it has a capacity of 120GB

I can’t figure out why wouldn’t just use 3 different folders instead of 3 different partitions? Just put different folders in your My Documents folder. What is your idea? Are you attempting to increase performance by havinig 3 different partitions?

Originally posted by shuebhussain
[B]i have no idea what swap files are, or how i should save them - i’m no expert!

BTW, my HDD model is 120GXP but that doesn’t mean it has a capacity of 120GB [/B]

To put it in simple words:

A swap file is used by Windows for Virtual Memory Management. Whenever your RAM is completely utilized, Windows will write a portion of it to the swap file and then re-use the freed space for the new application. This also mean as lot of disk access - hence it makes sence to make a separate partition for your swap file to optimal performance.

Sorry, got your disk space wrong. Never mind :wink:

swap partitions are not common for windows installs, as most users dont think to add them. the ones that do are already running linux

Originally posted by ckin2001
swap partitions are not common for windows installs, as most users dont think to add them. the ones that do are already running linux
Are you?

Originally posted by ExpertTech
A swap file is used by Windows for Virtual Memory Management. Whenever your RAM is completely utilized, Windows will write a portion of it to the swap file and then re-use the freed space for the new application. This also mean as lot of disk access - hence it makes sence to make a separate partition for your swap file to optimal performance.
I have so much ram, will that happen on my PC? even so, if i was to make a swap file partition, how big. what FS and how do i tell win XP to use the partition for swap filing?

It’s called a “paging file” now days. If you want to know where you’re is at, and it’s size, look up:
system properties - advanced tab - performance options. go into “change” and it’s all spelled out. At install, windows sets this to different min and max sizes, depending on the RAM that is in the system at the time. If you have ample HD space, set it as high as you like, but I highly recommend changing the sizes to min=max. If you have abuundant RAM, it doesn’t much matter where you put it. The size is also irrelevant to performance as long as min=max.

Many state that it should be 1.5 x RAM, but this is not really true unless you intend to analyze memory dumps after a crash. In fact, I suggest you disable the memory dump function, (also on the advanced tab, “startup and recovery”. This will waste HD space as it saves to a file on your root directory that can be hundreds of MB in size, as it serves no real purpose.
So anyway, make your paging file 1000MB to 1500MB if you have the space, 500MB may well be adequate if you have 500MB or more of RAM. Windows will inform you if you run out of space. in the paging file.

would you consider 768 SDram “abundant” for a P3 800mhz PC with an 80 gig HDD?

When you say min, is that the same as initial?
My initial value is @ 1152MB and the max is 2304MB. Would you say this is abnormal and needs changing? tia

You replied while I was editing.

I would set it to 1024 initial and 1024 max, but again if you have the space there’s no harm in making it bigger. The main thing is to set min=max to prevent fragmentation of both the file and the rest of the HD. You can monitor all of the system memory functions with Performance Monitor, which is found in Admin Tools.

but does initial = Minimum
?

but does initial = Minimum

Yup

{nice fast replys :):)}

I only have file paging for 1 partition - my second smallest (windows partition). Shouhld i enable it for the other 2 partitions (Multimedia files and CD/DVD image files)?

no, no, no! :eek:
If you do that, Windows will be trying to access all of them at once! (slow). Unless you are putting it on a second drive, leave it in your system partition. If you place it on a second drive, it is also recommended to leave a small (10-20MB) file in the system partition. The benefit of placing it on a second physical drive is that your system can then access it at the same time it is accessing the main drive. But, if your system rarely uses the file, it won’t make any difference where it is. If you wish to move it for space considerations, anywhere on the first physical drive will work. Of course, if you have a utility like Partition Magic, you can also move the free space from partition to partition to accomodate it.
I have also heard of people with multi-boot setups using the same paging file for each OS.

luckyly a friend has a copy of partition magic that i can use.

can partition magic create totally new partitions from already formatted disk space? if yes, :bigsmile:

Since you mentioned multi-boot setups, do you know where i can get some info on making a multi boot setup. tia again.

P.M. has an included utility called Boot Magic. But, If you install Win2K/XP after the first installed OS, the resident boot manager will handle things very nicely.
Yes P.M. can do most anything. What you’ll need to do is shrink the existing partition, then create the new one in the unallocated space that is left. You can put the new space either before or after the existing one. If you install P.M., make sure to create a set of rescue floppies, then you can run it anytime from those with limited but adequate function. While you’re partitioning, consider creating a small FAT partition, there you can store stuff like MTKFlash and WSES and run them from a boot floppy. That way you can make everything else NTFS, and when you boot to DOS the FAT partition will show up as “C” drive. If you already have a FAT32 partition, never mind.
As always, BACK UP before any partitioning tasks. :slight_smile:

Originally posted by shuebhussain
Are you?

yes