Partition Magic 'PqRP' drive type. What the?

Hi Anyone,

I’d like to know how to access my D drive partition, after attempting to Resize (enlarge) my C partition by moving space from D to C. I got message that read something like. “Partition magic needs to restart your PC in DOS mode…” It did so, then frooze.

I restarted my PC but it no longer recognised the D drive. I re-entered Partition Magic to see what was happening. The partition type had gone from a FAT32 and is now a ‘PqRP’.

There is no ‘PqRP’ in the help index of my version of P Magic V 5. Is there a fix please? I would be most grateful for some wise advice.

Ranger - Sydney, Australia

I think that PqRP stands for “PowerQuest Resize Partition” but don’t quote my on that.

I think what happened was it renamed your partition while it was resizing it but froze before renaming it back.

Right now be prepared that you may have lost everything on your D drive. Hopefully a solution will present itself but be prepered to format and start again.

I always use the lastest version (8 I think) when I redo my partitions so unfortunatly I can’t help you that much with version 5. What you need to be looking for (hopefully in the help file) is something on troubleshooting problems/ errors/ returning to old state, etc.

I think that the program gave you the option of making repair disks?? (Maybe I am thinking of a different program). I am now praying that if it did you made them. If so I would look to see that they will do. They should return the drive to the way before anything was done.Then I sugest using them.

Hope this gets you started.

Keep on posting as you go on things that you have found but be carefull what you do or you could lose all the data on your D drive if it has not alrady gone.

if the drive was fat32, it shouldnt be hard to recover the data, if the partition itself is indeed lost.

this link seems to have LOADS of solutions for data recovery. scroll down to the 2nd post :wink:

http://www-tcsn.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP/Q_20694789.html

Or you check at the support pages of PowerQuest itself :bigsmile:

OK. As found in the PowerQuest manual. Some info on what has happened.

PqRP Partitions

If your computer fails during a PartitionMagic operation, you may see a partition that displays as PqRP or PQFLEX in the partition list in the main screen. PartitionMagic flags a partition with a PqRP file system and a PQFLEX label, so you know that the partition has been modified. You should assume that a PqRP partition is not stable. Contact PowerQuest technical support for help in recovering data from a PqRP partition.

If you own your copy then you can phone them up and they will solve your problems. If you don’t then read on and “hopefully” we can solve it.

PTEdit is a free download from PowerQuest. 400Kb
ftp://ftp.powerquest.com/pub/utilities/ptedit.zip

Info I have found,
Note: the file ptedit.exe can also be found in the \utility\dos directory on either CD.

** Warning: older versions of ptedit.exe cannot edit the boot record of hidden NTFS partitions. There are several versions of ptedit.exe that identify themselves as “Version 1.0”, so check the file date. Versions prior to the 10/22/1999 version (filesize 494,922 bytes) reportedly have this bug. If you are using an older version (and note PowerQuest has not updated their ftp site as of this writing), the solution to editing hidden NTFS boot records is simple: use ptedit.exe to change the partition type from “17” (hidden NTFS) to “07” (regular NTFS), then edit the boot record, then change the partition type back to “17”.

I am not sure if that will help you or confuse you.

Next all you need to do is run PTEdit and follow the instructions. So long as they are correct then everything should be fine. I havn’t used the program before so I can’t give really explict instructions to you.

Note. The program WILL NOT run in Windows XP not sure about 95,98,Me so you may have to drop into dos to run it. This means that you are going to need a boot disk.

Solution: Fixing a PQRP with PTEDIT

To fix a PQRP with PTEDIT:

  1. Run PTEDIT.

  2. Locate the PQRP (partition type 3C).

    If the PQRP occurred on a logical partition, click “GoToEPBR” to locate the correct partition.

  3. Click in the “Type” field associated with the 3C partition.

  4. Click “Set Type.”

    A list of available partition types is displayed.

  5. Select the appropriate partition type (e.g., FAT32 if the partition type was FAT32 before the PQRP, etc.).

  6. Save the changes and exit.

If the system does not boot properly at this point, run a directory listing (DIR) on the drive and make sure there are no “DYN_ROOT” entries. A “DYN_ROOT” indicates that the original root directory has been relocated but can, in most cases, be restored. If the directory listing appears as random ASCII code or unrecognizable characters, the partition is likely corrupt and cannot be recovered.

Note: If the root directory appears as a DYN_ROOT, do not SYS the drive. Modifications made to the drive while in this state can reduce the probability of recovery. Contact PowerQuest Technical Support for further assistance.

This is good information for PQ Let us if it works like is supposed to.

Might make this a sticky…

I’ve learned the same hard way to never let PM run from Windows on a “hot” partition. Always run it in DOS from the floppy. Something about the “virtual floppy” and batch file that it creates to run from Windows seems to be unstable. Same for Drive Image.

Hi guys,
I’ve read quite a few threads on different boards in the last hour or so… and unfortunately, none of them have helped me, yet.
Before I get into the dilemma, a quick run down of my system specs:

Athlon 2800XP+ processor
1 GB DDR333 RAM
ASUS A7V8X-X motherboard
Ricoh MP7083 CD-RW
C:/G: Seagate Barracuda (30GB)
D: Seagate Barracuda (120GB)
E: Seagate Barracuda (22GB)
F: IBM Deskstar SCSI-2 (9GB)
Win2KPro

OK, now the dilemma… oh joy…

My best friend and I have spent the last 3 years recording an album. It’s almost finished.
That C:/G: combo in my specs… that’s a 30GB drive partitioned into a 1GB C: NTFS and a 29GB G: FAT32, and the whole freakin’ album is on the G: partition.
Now, call me a dick if you like, but that’s not going to help me. :slight_smile:
I decided I needed more C: drive space.
The album takes up 24GB of the 29GB.
So, I ran Partition Magic v6.
I gave it 3 instructions.

  1. I told it to move the G: data towards the end of the drive.
  2. Resize the G: from the front end, making it smaller.
  3. Expand the C: to give me a 3GB C:.
    I rebooted as instructed.
    PM started it’s job, but then it stopped responding.
    I waited, and waited, and waited…
    Nothing.
    So, I rebooted, fearing the worst.
    Sure enough, the G: is now a PGRP file system.
    And yes, I’ve read up on that… I understand that it’s a Poerquest invention that prevents Windows from writing to the partition (Windows won’t write to a file system it doesn’t understand) so that the user can have time to recover the lost data.
    I’ve also read that it is not unusual for PM to take a long time to complete tasks, and that I should have tried the NUMLOCK key to see if the system was still responding… but it’s too late for that now.
    I’ve run PTEdit.
    I’ve changed the file system descriptor to FAT32.
    I’ve rebooted.
    The directory strucure on G: is intact, but the data is not showing up in Windows Explorer.
    However (and this is where my hope is hanging by a thread), I am confident that the data can be recovered because if I launch PM again, it shows G: as being 27,XXXMB total, 24,XXXMB used, and 389MB free.
    Obviously, those figures don’t add up, and if I’ve lost 2GB of data, then so be it. I’ll take my chances. I’m hoping that 2GB is just unallocated space.
    But, it would appear that somewhere on that drive is my 24GB of music data.
    Please, please, please… does anyone have any ideas as to what I should try next?
    I cannot describe how catastrophic this is going to be if I lose all that data.
    And I know what you’re thinking… “the guy has over 150GB of disk space elsewhere… why didn’t he move the critical data off the drive he was going to mess with?”
    Yeah, believe me, I’ve been wondering that for the last 2 hours now.
    If anyone has any ideas, I would be extremely grateful.
    Have a good day/night all.

Bruce ,
why dont you try to use (since your drive is once more accessible,
and the directory structure on G: is intact)a software for recovering the data.I can recommend you “EasyRecovery Professional Edition” and their website is http://www.ontrack.com/
Perhaps it will help ,but i think you have to run the program from your C partition.Anyway read the instructions and i wish you good luck.
Cheers
Nikos

Hi all,

I have experience a similar problem. I will be greatly appreciated if you can give me some advise:

  1. I have a 80GB NTFS with WinXP Pro on my laptop in 1 partition.
  2. I have set three steps to get PM to do: resize, create new partition in new space
  3. Power failure occurs when resizing the big partition (step 1)
  4. When I try to boot to WinXP, BSD and says STOP 0x24 (as expected)
  5. When I use PTedit, the type remains 07 (NTFS) and not PqRP.

I can attach the partition info using partinfo if you would like more information
Could you please suggest me what I can go about this problem?

Many thanks,
Steve

Well, this won’t help you now, but in the future I think you should dump PM and start using BootitNG, a far better disk imager/partitioner/boot manager. Never had a problem with it.

[QUOTE=Womble;475508]OK. As found in the PowerQuest manual. Some info on what has happened.

PqRP Partitions

If your computer fails during a PartitionMagic operation, you may see a partition that displays as PqRP or PQFLEX in the partition list in the main screen. PartitionMagic flags a partition with a PqRP file system and a PQFLEX label, so you know that the partition has been modified. You should assume that a PqRP partition is not stable. Contact PowerQuest technical support for help in recovering data from a PqRP partition.

If you own your copy then you can phone them up and they will solve your problems. If you don’t then read on and “hopefully” we can solve it.

PTEdit is a free download from PowerQuest. 400Kb
ftp://ftp.powerquest.com/pub/utilities/ptedit.zip

Info I have found,
Note: the file ptedit.exe can also be found in the \utility\dos directory on either CD.

** Warning: older versions of ptedit.exe cannot edit the boot record of hidden NTFS partitions. There are several versions of ptedit.exe that identify themselves as “Version 1.0”, so check the file date. Versions prior to the 10/22/1999 version (filesize 494,922 bytes) reportedly have this bug. If you are using an older version (and note PowerQuest has not updated their ftp site as of this writing), the solution to editing hidden NTFS boot records is simple: use ptedit.exe to change the partition type from “17” (hidden NTFS) to “07” (regular NTFS), then edit the boot record, then change the partition type back to “17”.

I am not sure if that will help you or confuse you.

Next all you need to do is run PTEdit and follow the instructions. So long as they are correct then everything should be fine. I havn’t used the program before so I can’t give really explict instructions to you.

Note. The program WILL NOT run in Windows XP not sure about 95,98,Me so you may have to drop into dos to run it. This means that you are going to need a boot disk.

Solution: Fixing a PQRP with PTEDIT

To fix a PQRP with PTEDIT:

  1. Run PTEDIT.

  2. Locate the PQRP (partition type 3C).

    If the PQRP occurred on a logical partition, click “GoToEPBR” to locate the correct partition.

  3. Click in the “Type” field associated with the 3C partition.

  4. Click “Set Type.”

    A list of available partition types is displayed.

  5. Select the appropriate partition type (e.g., FAT32 if the partition type was FAT32 before the PQRP, etc.).

  6. Save the changes and exit.

If the system does not boot properly at this point, run a directory listing (DIR) on the drive and make sure there are no “DYN_ROOT” entries. A “DYN_ROOT” indicates that the original root directory has been relocated but can, in most cases, be restored. If the directory listing appears as random ASCII code or unrecognizable characters, the partition is likely corrupt and cannot be recovered.

Note: If the root directory appears as a DYN_ROOT, do not SYS the drive. Modifications made to the drive while in this state can reduce the probability of recovery. Contact PowerQuest Technical Support for further assistance.[/QUOTE]

Just register here to say you THANKS A TON with the solution…:clap::clap: Same was caused with my HDD… I was so much worried for it cause my most important drive and data abt to lose … great work… thank you and thanks myce.com

cheers!!!

Vishal

I just signed in to thank you. It completely helped me. I wish you all the best!!!

Registered to say thanks. The solution worked almost fine for me.
Two observations:
As I´m a dumb, I didn´t realize to click repeat this: “GoToEPBR” to locate the correct partition." (I expected to see all partition at once. I had to click and click again until the correct particion appears… LOL…

I used PTEDIT32 as my HD is a 320gb not supported by bios. I´m in a Pentium III 800 machine (no kidding) and Windows Xp can see the aditional space at drive.

Appears I recovered all data.

Thanks a lot!

[QUOTE=gilbertopb;2610068]Registered to say thanks. The solution worked almost fine for me.
Two observations:
As I´m a dumb, I didn´t realize to click repeat this: “GoToEPBR” to locate the correct partition." (I expected to see all partition at once. I had to click and click again until the correct particion appears… LOL…

I used PTEDIT32 as my HD is a 320gb not supported by bios. I´m in a Pentium III 800 machine (no kidding) and Windows Xp can see the aditional space at drive.

Appears I recovered all data.

Thanks a lot![/QUOTE]

You have learned that moving partitions on a “hot” drive with data you care about (without backing it up somewhere else) is a bad idea.

I would also suggest you accelerate your search for a newer computer.