Override speed settings

Hi, I can’t find any answer to this important question (for me!).

I would like to know what are the consequences of overriding the speed settings of my cd/dvd burner, can I damage the device? Let me explain my situation.

I have a NEC/SONY Optiarc AD-7170A, which is great by the way, and the minimum writting speed of the device is 8x. Can I damage the device if I override the speed setting by writing slower than 8x lets say 4x for quality purposes (slower the writing, better the quality for audio). I can’t find any clear answer on that question, can anyone help me?

Thanks

Yo-

DVD audio??

Most of the time - slower doesn’t necessarily mean better - better to write to very good medias like Taiyo Yuden 8x or Verbatim 16x medias - and do your burns at 8x for both-

If doing audio CD-R - then suggest burning at 16x maximum - again on very good media - in this case Taiyo Yuden-eh!!

Thanks for your time bigmike7 but that does not answer my question.

If you take some time to look at techniques used to write cds and especially music you’ll see that the writing speed affect directly the quality, slower writing speed leave less gap in the data structure and thus less errors.

Take an audio cd writen at 32x and read it in a particulary sensitive system and you will get skips. Take the same cd (well another cd) writen at slower speed lets say 8x and you will het less skips if not at all.

So, if I force a writer which as a “manufactured” minumum speed of 8x to write at slower speed could it damage the device?

Forcing a CD to be burnt slower will end up with one of 2 things.

Either the disc will not be burnt at the selected speed and will instead write at the minimum speed the drive supports but the software will still tell you its being written slower (check the total burn time)

or

The drive will switch into using a default strategy for unknown media giving you really poor results.

As for “really slow burning being better”, no. I have found this to only really be true of poor quality media where the disc is off center or wobbles in which case it allows the laser to follow it better. The drawback of using poor quality media is that your data may be fine today or tomorrow but after that you may need to reburn it.

Media quality has more impact on the quality of the burn than forcing very low speeds does, using a default strategy on a good quality disc will result in poor writing performance, increasing the speed so the drive uses a known writing strategy will yeild better results as the drive is not having to second guess how to do things.

[QUOTE=Shrimp;2028763]Hi, I can’t find any answer to this important question (for me!).

I would like to know what are the consequences of overriding the speed settings of my cd/dvd burner, can I damage the device? Let me explain my situation.

I have a NEC/SONY Optiarc AD-7170A, which is great by the way, and the minimum writting speed of the device is 8x. Can I damage the device if I override the speed setting by writing slower than 8x lets say 4x for quality purposes ([B]slower the writing, better the quality for audio[/B]). I can’t find any clear answer on that question, can anyone help me?

Thanks[/QUOTE]

Wrong conclusion.
Get reliable media and burn at 16x or 24x.

Thanks for you answers. I think I have good quality cd, I use Sony CD-R which I presume to be good cds. The problem I have is with my car radio which skips sometimes and I thought using slower writing speed would correct the issue. I’ll have a look to find even better quality cds. Again, thanks all for your time.

Many people suggest to burn audio CDs at 16x speed. Often the playback issues are due to an high jitter, and 16x is the best option to burn audio.

Some car readers are however very picky even if the disc is burned good. If you can, the best option is to buy a car stereo with an USB port or a SD reader, so you can store your audio files on a flash memory or a portable HDD.

With todays burners you should be able to burn at or close to the rated speed, regardless of what you set it to burn at the media has it’s own burn speeds on it and Sony media isn’t always made by Sony as they farm it out to many companies to manufacture their disc so the quality control could be questionable

[QUOTE=Jimbo;2029053]Sony media isn’t always made by Sony as they farm it out to many companies to manufacture their disc so the quality control could be questionable[/QUOTE] Check out the Blank Media section, tons of great info. You could sort of get an idea of who makes what and who farms out to who and etc…:slight_smile: