Only 1 Core Instead Of 2

vbimport

#1

Hi there, Back with another odd problem, I recently had a PSU failure, I bought A new Compatible 430 Watt PSU and installed it and everything seemed fine, I have noticed some decrease in performance and started checking my components, Ram CPU e.t.c, I looked in My Computer properties and listed was 3.0GB of RAM (I have 4GB but Windows 32 only shows 3GB) It also shows
Intel® Pentium 4 CPU 3.00GHz 2.99GHz
I am on SP3 Windows XP Home 32
The problem is that in device manager when I expand Processors it now only shows 1 Processor, I know this showed 2 cores before even after updating SP3, CPiD Shows 1 core running at 2.992.6MHz, I am really worried about this.
I have Dell Dimension 5000 HT
Prescott Socket 775LGA
Intel Pentium 4 (530) CPU 2 X 3.0GHz Processors
4 X 1GB Orca DDR2 Ram Modules
ASUS EAH 4650 512MB HDMI Graphics Card
I just don’t understand why this is happening, I did not touch the CPU housing during installation and I am sure that i is wired up the same, I know that the way the cores work is by splitting 1 core in half to produce a second virtual core but I run a lot of programs and this affects browsing as well as viewing Movies on my PC, Please tell me this is a problem I can fix easily, Forking out for a new PSU just before Christmas was bad enough without needing a new core as well.
Also when trying to run a troubleshooter, I get an ActiveX Control error saying security settings have stopped displaying page properly and I cannot proceed further than “I have a problem with my Hardware”
Thamks RGK.


#2

Have you looked in the BIOS for a Hyperthreading feature - that’s where the option to enable/disable HT on my Pentium D PC is. :slight_smile:


#3

Your CPU (P4 530) is a single core CPU, not a dual core. It however does support hyper-threading, which will show a second “virtual” CPU in both the device manager and task manager.

Check your BIOS and verify that hyper threading is enabled.

*Edit: Too slow, haha


#4

Thank you both, You both seem to be pointing me in the same direction so I wicheck that out.
Thanks again RGK…


#5

Thanks very much, All sorted now, Have you any idea how this option became disabled? And also, Do you know how it made such a big difference when it was turned off considering it’s not a “True” second core?, I know that it now shows that I have 2 3.0GHz Cores surely that must give it extra power or processing when you consider a basic Athlon 64 has a single 2.0GHz core and they are in a lot of PC’s that are slightly older.
I just built a new PC for my brother which had a NVIDEA chipset, 2 X 2GB DDR2 800MHz Corsair Ram Modules, A Phenom II Black Edition Quad-core Processor - 3.00 GHz, on a Gigabyte GA-M720-US3 - Motherboard , Are the cores in this CPU virtual? Or are they “True” cores? Being at 3.0GHz also surely this processor is twice as powerful as my own?
Just wondering, I know that only a single core can run any 1 game at a time so in theory the 2 cores should play games just as well as each other and the advantage goes to the Phenom II when doing Normal windows applications such as Multi-Processing tasks, Burning media, Editing Media and even Encoding?
If I am wrong please put me straight Knowledge avoids ridicule…
Forever Grateful RGK!


#6

Hyperthreading was technology developed before it’s time. At the time, processors were single core and all applications were single threaded, that is they could work on one task at a time. Hyperthreading changed that and was the precursor to true multicore processing. It required applications to be multi-thread aware, able to work on more than one task at a time.

Multi-threading allows you to process more information more quickly and efficiently. A hyperthreaded processor can finish those tasks faster than a non-hyperthreaded processor. A true multicore processor will finish those tasks faster than a single core processor. Hypertheading went away for some time, but has recently returned on some of Intel’s quad core processors, those show up as having 8 cores in the task manager.

The Athlon processor is a true multi-core design.


#7

Thank you, That’s incredible, So is the I7 Quad core capable of Hyperthreading as well as being a Quad Core Design?
RGK…


#8

Yes, the Intel Core i7 are Quad-core chips that support Hyperthreading.


#9

Download CPU-z. That will give you all the info you need about your CPU.


#10

Glad we could help :slight_smile:

How a BIOS setting could become disabled without your input is mystifying me, too - the HT setting in my own BIOS mentioned above has been enabled since I got the PC, and has always remained so, despite me going in and out of the BIOS altering various settings. :wink:


#11

[QUOTE=Arachne;2469407]Glad we could help :slight_smile:

How a BIOS setting could become disabled without your input is mystifying me, too - the HT setting in my own BIOS mentioned above has been enabled since I got the PC, and has always remained so, despite me going in and out of the BIOS altering various settings. ;)[/QUOTE]

He said he replaced his PSU. If the cmos battery has issues then the bios settings may have reset to default when there was no power to the board. Just a thought.

Either way I’d be updating my mobo bios as my bet is it’s probably original and there are certain to be updates that might even address his paticular issue. :slight_smile: