Only 1 Core Instead Of 2

Hi there, Back with another odd problem, I recently had a PSU failure, I bought A new Compatible 430 Watt PSU and installed it and everything seemed fine, I have noticed some decrease in performance and started checking my components, Ram CPU e.t.c, I looked in My Computer properties and listed was 3.0GB of RAM (I have 4GB but Windows 32 only shows 3GB) It also shows
Intel® Pentium 4 CPU 3.00GHz 2.99GHz
I am on SP3 Windows XP Home 32
The problem is that in device manager when I expand Processors it now only shows 1 Processor, I know this showed 2 cores before even after updating SP3, CPiD Shows 1 core running at 2.992.6MHz, I am really worried about this.
I have Dell Dimension 5000 HT
Prescott Socket 775LGA
Intel Pentium 4 (530) CPU 2 X 3.0GHz Processors
4 X 1GB Orca DDR2 Ram Modules
ASUS EAH 4650 512MB HDMI Graphics Card
I just don’t understand why this is happening, I did not touch the CPU housing during installation and I am sure that i is wired up the same, I know that the way the cores work is by splitting 1 core in half to produce a second virtual core but I run a lot of programs and this affects browsing as well as viewing Movies on my PC, Please tell me this is a problem I can fix easily, Forking out for a new PSU just before Christmas was bad enough without needing a new core as well.
Also when trying to run a troubleshooter, I get an ActiveX Control error saying security settings have stopped displaying page properly and I cannot proceed further than “I have a problem with my Hardware”
Thamks RGK.

Have you looked in the BIOS for a Hyperthreading feature - that’s where the option to enable/disable HT on my Pentium D PC is. :slight_smile:

Your CPU (P4 530) is a single core CPU, not a dual core. It however does support hyper-threading, which will show a second “virtual” CPU in both the device manager and task manager.

Check your BIOS and verify that hyper threading is enabled.

*Edit: Too slow, haha

Thank you both, You both seem to be pointing me in the same direction so I wicheck that out.
Thanks again RGK…

Thanks very much, All sorted now, Have you any idea how this option became disabled? And also, Do you know how it made such a big difference when it was turned off considering it’s not a “True” second core?, I know that it now shows that I have 2 3.0GHz Cores surely that must give it extra power or processing when you consider a basic Athlon 64 has a single 2.0GHz core and they are in a lot of PC’s that are slightly older.
I just built a new PC for my brother which had a NVIDEA chipset, 2 X 2GB DDR2 800MHz Corsair Ram Modules, A Phenom II Black Edition Quad-core Processor - 3.00 GHz, on a Gigabyte GA-M720-US3 - Motherboard , Are the cores in this CPU virtual? Or are they “True” cores? Being at 3.0GHz also surely this processor is twice as powerful as my own?
Just wondering, I know that only a single core can run any 1 game at a time so in theory the 2 cores should play games just as well as each other and the advantage goes to the Phenom II when doing Normal windows applications such as Multi-Processing tasks, Burning media, Editing Media and even Encoding?
If I am wrong please put me straight Knowledge avoids ridicule…
Forever Grateful RGK!

Hyperthreading was technology developed before it’s time. At the time, processors were single core and all applications were single threaded, that is they could work on one task at a time. Hyperthreading changed that and was the precursor to true multicore processing. It required applications to be multi-thread aware, able to work on more than one task at a time.

Multi-threading allows you to process more information more quickly and efficiently. A hyperthreaded processor can finish those tasks faster than a non-hyperthreaded processor. A true multicore processor will finish those tasks faster than a single core processor. Hypertheading went away for some time, but has recently returned on some of Intel’s quad core processors, those show up as having 8 cores in the task manager.

The Athlon processor is a true multi-core design.

Thank you, That’s incredible, So is the I7 Quad core capable of Hyperthreading as well as being a Quad Core Design?
RGK…

Yes, the Intel Core i7 are Quad-core chips that support Hyperthreading.

Download CPU-z. That will give you all the info you need about your CPU.

Glad we could help :slight_smile:

How a BIOS setting could become disabled without your input is mystifying me, too - the HT setting in my own BIOS mentioned above has been enabled since I got the PC, and has always remained so, despite me going in and out of the BIOS altering various settings. :wink:

[QUOTE=Arachne;2469407]Glad we could help :slight_smile:

How a BIOS setting could become disabled without your input is mystifying me, too - the HT setting in my own BIOS mentioned above has been enabled since I got the PC, and has always remained so, despite me going in and out of the BIOS altering various settings. ;)[/QUOTE]

He said he replaced his PSU. If the cmos battery has issues then the bios settings may have reset to default when there was no power to the board. Just a thought.

Either way I’d be updating my mobo bios as my bet is it’s probably original and there are certain to be updates that might even address his paticular issue. :slight_smile: