One of the biggest internet annoyances disappears, Oracle stops with Java browser plugin

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: One of the biggest internet annoyances disappears, Oracle stops with Java browser plugin[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2013/01/Java-logo.png[/newsimage]

One of the biggest annoyances for internet users will disappear, Oracle will no longer offer its Java browser plugin which very frequently asked to be updated and often made pages slow.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/one-of-the-biggest-internet-annoyances-disappears-oracle-stops-with-java-browser-plugin-78484/](http://www.myce.com/news/one-of-the-biggest-internet-annoyances-disappears-oracle-stops-with-java-browser-plugin-78484/)

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#2

Hmmm. I wonder what exactly will be the benefit of this apart from that the battle will change from battling vulnerable plugins like flash, java whatever we at least had some control over to fighting malicious HTML5/XML content within the browser itself.

I know what we could do… pure text, pure links, no real interactive contents and download everything even download only for films and commercials we would like to see and only download for sound etc. thus probably be way safer.
The ultimate best is the dumb all manual terminal, case closed we’re pretty much safe. - and so on - Do we want it?

We know the answer - NO, we do not want it. On the contrary, we want interactive contents, we want convenience… and by that approach, we also say yes to be vulnerable in terms of malicious interactive contents.
A known vulnerability is no problem to handle for all the know-how techies, heck it’s known and so it is no problem - The unknown on the other hand…

I am for change at all times, but I think they move too fast on this subject and that rushing it is only going to get back at us.

Oh well, Adobe abandons the Flash plugin, Java abandons plug-in.
Sure is a lot of obsolete multimedia, games and other interactive contents in a few years - and my digital toolbox will yet again have changed radically.


#3

Java on web pages? It’s only the odd site or two, in comparison to the vast ranks of Flash games


#4

[QUOTE=Matth;2767492]Java on web pages? It’s only the odd site or two, in comparison to the vast ranks of Flash games[/QUOTE]

Yep, I read you… The heyday of Java games went away with the introduction of Java 7. Still, there used to be loads of fun games even there.
As I mention, Flash is discontinued too and so My view was more that they move away from proven and known technology into the not so thoroughly tested.
It will as I see it become a patching hell for a while before finally landing… Hopefully not in a crash :wink:


#5

It could be argued that the patching hell will affect each system differently. This will make it harder for malware devs to write an exploit that works on every browser, a task that was previously make considerably easier by attacking Flash Player. After all, pretty much every modern browser supports Flash Player, but not every browser has the same vulnerabilities. I doubt that a Firefox bug will effect Chrome, and vise versa.