Official: OCZ to honor all product warranties

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Official: OCZ to honor all product warranties[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/12/myce-ocz-vector150_lrg-95x75.png[/newsimage]

An official statement from an OCZ employee learns us the company will honor product warranties.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/official-ocz-to-honor-all-product-warranties-69734/](http://www.myce.com/news/official-ocz-to-honor-all-product-warranties-69734/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Good news for me, I have a lot of OCZ SSDs, and my Vectors and my Vertex 4.50 are under warrantee for many years to come.


#3

That seems like a rather deceptive claim. Warranty claims are in effect a very low priority unsecured creditor against OCZ. Unless a bankruptcy judge has approved such action, higher priority unsecured & secured creditors would have first dibs on their assets. Further, this means nothing in terms of long term warranty coverage. The OCZ entity that has warranties with customers won’t exist shortly.


#4

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2711611]That seems like a rather deceptive claim. Warranty claims are in effect a very low priority unsecured creditor against OCZ. Unless a bankruptcy judge has approved such action, higher priority unsecured & secured creditors would have first dibs on their assets. Further, this means nothing in terms of long term warranty coverage. The OCZ entity that has warranties with customers won’t exist shortly.[/QUOTE]

thanks for the good news :sad:


#5

You guys should read publicly available info before posting erroneous info. OCZ will cover the warranties until the Chapter 11 is complete, but not after.
As per their press release today:
“OCZ will continue to operate and serve existing and future customers during this process.” RE-the filing. After that, go fish.
No warranties.


#6

I guess you’re same person posting on LinkedIn as well? I would not call the info above erroneous. The item above is based on a publicly available forum post from a support employee stating he received the official confirmation.

Your information is at the moment an assumption (and it could be right indeed). When the post above was written the information you refer wasn’t available yet.

So let’s wait and see.


#7

one of the prime “assets” of OCZ is something called "Brand Recognition"
and frankly acquiring that “asset” would be the most likely reason for someone like Toshiba to buy the remains of OCZ.

supporting the warranties of the existing products would likely be
a necessity of making the “OCZ Brand” worth owning.

I can easily see Toshiba buying it Lock, Stock & Barrel simply to start slapping OCZ labels on their own products and shipping them in OCZ boxes purely as a way to grab more market share.

I have never been a particular fan of OCZ’s business model, but brand recognition is something they DO have.


#8

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2711732]one of the prime “assets” of OCZ is something called "Brand Recognition"
and frankly acquiring that “asset” would be the most likely reason for someone like Toshiba to buy the remains of OCZ.

supporting the warranties of the existing products would likely be
a necessity of making the “OCZ Brand” worth owning.

I can easily see Toshiba buying it Lock, Stock & Barrel simply to start slapping OCZ labels on their own products and shipping them in OCZ boxes purely as a way to grab more market share.

I have never been a particular fan of OCZ’s business model, but brand recognition is something they DO have.[/QUOTE]

Agree :iagree::iagree:


#9

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2711732]I have never been a particular fan of OCZ’s business model, but brand recognition is something they DO have.[/QUOTE]
Yes, but they’re notorious, not well respected.


#10

If they keep the OCZ brand name alive they have to honor the warrantees.:wink:


#11

[QUOTE=alan1476;2711755]If they keep the OCZ brand name alive they have to honor the warrantees.;)[/QUOTE]
Not that I’m aware of. There are past examples of this. For example, Guillemot bought Hercules out of bankruptcy. They bought the name and some other assets, but they did not assume liability or warranty for Hercules products from the pre-bankruptcy period.


#12

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2711760]Not that I’m aware of. There are past examples of this. For example, Guillemot bought Hercules out of bankruptcy. They bought the name and some other assets, but they did not assume liability or warranty for Hercules products from the pre-bankruptcy period.[/QUOTE]

It would be a terrible mistake PR wise not to do this, they want to keep their brand alive not kill it with more bad news.:smiley:


#13

It’s both true OCZ has good names and some bad names, but it’s also true Toshiba has only to gain by offering better warranty terms for existing OCZ customers. Selling some of Toshiba-made products under OCZ brand name to ship to retail can be a good idea especially since there are still at least tens of thousands of loyal OCZ customers visiting Amazon (US and UK) and newegg.com. But I doubt Toshiba is interested in such a niche market.

What’s not clear is just on what conditions Toshiba is purchasing some of OCZ’s assets. I can’t trust what OCZ publishes on its web or through emails and forum posts. The current OCZ CEO was not even part of OCZ at the time OCZ moved into SSD business.


#14

You do realize that OCZ’s market share right now is around 4% right? That doesn’t sound like a multi-million Dollar deal to me. Toshiba’s Q-Series products are outselling OCZ products right now since Toshiba has amazing price points and OCZ’s price points are awful since they can’t get flash at wholesale prices.

Toshiba could care less about OCZ’s brand name and no, it’s not really an asset when you have Indilinx and SANRAD tucked away in the back pocket. Eye on the prize, not on the BS.


#15

I thought Toshiba probably bought ocz for its in house ssd controller manufacture and design facility i.e Indilinx


#16

Just my opinion and my thoughts but I think it would be wise of Toshiba to keep the OCZ name alive and use their nand and the Barefoot 3 controller, and make a super drive with the OCZ Toshiba footprint, it would be awesome, again , just my thoughts.:wink:


#17

[QUOTE=eddy64;2712321]I thought Toshiba probably bought ocz for its in house ssd controller manufacture and design facility i.e Indilinx[/QUOTE]

Toshiba could have easily bought Indilinx AND Mtron at once anytime in the past. It would probably cost far less to buy controller chips from Mavell and LSI than to buy OCZ just to own Indinlinx-designed controller.


#18

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2712406]Toshiba could have easily bought Indilinx AND Mtron at once anytime in the past. It would probably cost far less to buy controller chips from Mavell and LSI than to buy OCZ just to own Indinlinx-designed controller.[/QUOTE]

Yes but then Toshiba would have to play with the rules that LSI and MArvell want, having their own controller they dont have to rely on on any one else and they can have total control of their products (as samsung does) and if it’s possible to expand their market share maybe by lowering the price of their drives?

I also dont believe that the cheapest way is always the best choice, I also dont believe that this cost to much for Toshiba.


#19

[QUOTE=vroom;2712408]Yes but then Toshiba would have to play with the rules that LSI and MArvell want, having their own controller they dont have to rely on on any one else and they can have total control of their products (as samsung does) and if it’s possible to expand their market share maybe by lowering the price of their drives?

I also dont believe that the cheapest way is always the best choice, I also dont believe that this cost to much for Toshiba.[/QUOTE]

So why is it that Toshiba did not buy Indilinx in the first place?

Why is it that Indilinx had so much trouble for years to find money that it had to be sold to OCZ, not in return for cash, but in return for some share of OCZ company itself?

I’ve read for years what the owners and executives of both Mtron and Indilinx personally said. They were in trouble and had to be sold.

How can a company of three ex-Samsung engineers be in 2013 or 2014 a great asset for a Japanese electronics and semiconductor giant named Toshiba when it was almost irrelevant for several years that nearly determined the fate of global NAND and SSD industry in later decades?

Virtually everything posted on MyCE on the relationship among Indilinx, OCZ, and Toshiba is irrelevant to market reality.

If Toshiba could lower SSD prices, it could have done so anytime in the past. Unfortunately, Toshiba’s not known for aggressive pricing. Those Japanese conglomerates typically allow prices to come to to “generic” level. And when the market prices and competition are too unfavorable, they exit leaving market to Chinese, Taiwanese, and/or South Korean companies since the other three East-Asian countries are far more interested in market share (with the goal of export growth) than in profits.

And since when LSI and Marvell were such bad names in these industries? Just because they are now competitors against OCZ? What’s so wrong about buying controllers from independent Indilinx and LSI? What was the exact unit price of Indilinx controllers when sold to independent SSD makers?

As for the value of Indilinx inside OCZ, does anyone have analysts’ data assessing just how much Indilinx’s controller and IP accounts for in the eyes of Toshiba? Why do does anyone assume Toshiba would buy OCZ because it once bought Indilinx? All that is published and nearly confirmed to be true are that it acquired Indilinx some time ago and Indilinx once designed (not made) controllers for SSDs.

And I’m asking this for one more time. Why didn’t you yourselves buy OCZ stocks when you could for almost nothing if it was such a great company able to perform miracles every time?


#20

Just my opinion.
Indilinx after the original Barefoot controller probably wasn’t that appealing. They had been working on Jetstream, but for whatever reason couldn’t bring it to market.

The Indilinx Barefoot 3 is much more appealing, and is arguably the most powerful SSD controller at the moment. It is certainly faster than the current SF2281, LAMD, Marvell, and in a workstation environment is faster than the Samsung MEX controller. It also has the highest sustainable performance of any consumer grade SSD controller.

As it stands, Indilinx with Barefoot 3 is much more appealing to Toshiba than the original Barefoot ever was.