OCZ Vector 150 SSD Review

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following review: OCZ Vector 150 SSD Review[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/11/drive-small.jpg[/newsimage]

A year is a long time in the SSD business, and it’s hard to
believe that the original OCZ Vector SSD launched nearly one year ago.

Today I’m looking at the OCZ Vector refresh, the OCZ Vector 150 series.
Let’s find out what is new in this SSD, and how it performs in this review.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/review/ocz-vector-150-ssd-review-69449/](http://www.myce.com/review/ocz-vector-150-ssd-review-69449/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Excellent I have been looking forward to this for quite awhile. Wendy’s review is totally awesome., the last drive was Vertex 4.50 and now Vector 1.50, just joking, it just seems like starting all over LOL. Love the review and the drive , I need to buy one.:wink:


#3

Thanks Wendy - an excellent review.

The Vector 150 looks like a great drive - I’m particularly impressed by its standing in the Myce Sustainable Performance Test (which really ‘sorts the men out from the boys’, imo) .

It’s also interesting to see that the NAND is supplied by Toshiba - especially given the rumours regarding Toshiba’s interest in buying OCZ’s consumer business.

Regds, JR


#4

It does look excellent, Newegg is selling the 480gb at a 10 discount to MSRP> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820228075


#5

The endurance of the Toshiba 19nm NAND is also very impressive. I can see some enterprise buyers looking at the Vector 150 for mixed work loads, especially given its sustained performance.

Congratulations OCZ (and Toshiba)!

Regds, JR


#6

[QUOTE=JReynolds;2707885]The endurance of the Toshiba 19nm NAND is also very impressive. I can see some enterprise buyers looking at the Vector 150 for mixed work loads, especially given its sustained performance.

Congratulations OCZ (and Toshiba)!

Regds, JR[/QUOTE]
50GBs a day is very impressive, getting close to Enterprise area.:wink:


#7

[QUOTE=alan1476;2707886]50GBs a day is very impressive, getting close to Enterprise area.;)[/QUOTE]

It’s about warranty only though. At 3GB/s, it’s very easy to write 1PB a day.


#8

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2708212]It’s about warranty only though. At 3GB/s, it’s very easy to write 1PB a day.[/QUOTE]

Kenny, I have my OCZ Vector, first iteration, its been installed for 6 months and I don’t even have 3 TBs write. Same with my Seagate 600 Pro 400gb SSD, and thats rated much higher on writes per day.:wink: I do not think the avg person writes that much unless they are in business environment. :wink:


#9

[QUOTE=alan1476;2708214]Kenny, I have my OCZ Vector, first iteration, its been installed for 6 months and I don’t even have 3 TBs write. Same with my Seagate 600 Pro 400gb SSD, and thats rated much higher on writes per day.:wink: I do not think the avg person writes that much unless they are in business environment. ;)[/QUOTE]

I just meant it’s easy if one wants to. It does not have to be OCZ and it does not have to be business or power user or whatever.

1PB is of course a highly unrealistic number and I said that more as a joke. However, 20GB or 50GB a day is not meant as realistic either. It’s just put there for the manufacturers (hopefully) to reduce the number of returns.

By the way, I think you haven’t reached 3TB with that Vector because you use it mostly as a booting disk only, not for video editing or torrenting and because you have kept virtually unlimited number of devices. At 10MB/s download and 10MB/s upload, it’s 8.64TB write a day at least. That’s not what an “average” PC user does, not in statistics, but it’s not uncommon to see those that do write that much among SSD users. There’s a vast gap between 8.64TB and 1PB, but 50GB is still less than 1% of 8.64TB.

20GB a day times 730 days is 14.6TB. 29.2TB in four years, still less than 100TB for 50GB a day, I don’t think they are realistic numbers when SSD based on NAND is meant as STORAGE (something between RAM and backup media like tapes and optical disks.)


#10

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2708224]I just meant it’s easy if one wants to. It does not have to be OCZ and it does not have to be business or power user or whatever.

1PB is of course a highly unrealistic number and I said that more as a joke. However, 20GB or 50GB a day is not meant as realistic either. It’s just put there for the manufacturers (hopefully) to reduce the number of returns.

By the way, I think you haven’t reached 3TB with that Vector because you use it mostly as a booting disk only, not for video editing or torrenting and because you have kept virtually unlimited number of devices. At 10MB/s download and 10MB/s upload, it’s 8.64TB write a day at least. That’s not what an “average” PC user does, not in statistics, but it’s not uncommon to see those that do write that much among SSD users. There’s a vast gap between 8.64TB and 1PB, but 50GB is still less than 1% of 8.64TB.

20GB a day times 730 days is 14.6TB. 29.2TB in four years, still less than 100TB for 50GB a day, I don’t think they are realistic numbers when SSD based on NAND is meant as STORAGE (something between RAM and backup media like tapes and optical disks.)[/QUOTE] You are correct in one aspect, I do not torrent at all, but I do store and edit many movies on my Vector, transcoding about 2 to 3 movies a week. A nd yes it is my boot drive, who in their right mind would spend this kind of money on a data drive. I use my M4 512 as my data drive.


#11

[QUOTE=alan1476;2708226]You are correct in one aspect, I do not torrent at all, but I do store and edit many movies on my Vector, transcoding about 2 to 3 movies a week. A nd yes it is my boot drive, who in their right mind would spend this kind of money on a data drive. I use my M4 512 as my data drive.[/QUOTE]

I do because a PC storage is usually meant as a “temporary” data drive. SSD is not (yet) meant to replace HDD entirely, but it can do some of the storage tasks. There are people who capture hours of HDTV signals and encode them almost everyday. There are also people who download and upload terabytes through Bit Torrent and “web hard” and so on. It makes very good sense to use SSD instead of HDD for such tasks. For more permanent storage, the files on the SSD can be moved to HDD later.

Without having to use SSD for such tasks and others, a 16GB Mtron SLC NAND-based SSD can still run Windows 8 which can be bought for as low as US$10. Intel’s 32GB SLC NAND-based SSD costs about US$150, impossibly more expensive than Mtron’s, but at least cheaper than RAM. I found today a 64GB Toshiba 19nm MLC NAND-based SSD selling for about US$70.


#12

Hi Wendy:
Now that you have had your Vector 150 for awhile has anything about your assessment changed? I have heard some pretty great things about this SSDs stability, and durability, I would like to hear what your thoughts are after having it for awhile.


#13

100% stable.
More impressive, IMO, is this SSDs ability to deliver a high level of sustainable performance. It’s powers of recovery after being pushed very hard is unmatched, IMO.


#14

[QUOTE=Dee;2720946]100% stable.
More impressive, IMO, is this SSDs ability to deliver a high level of sustainable performance. It’s powers of recovery after being pushed very hard is unmatched, IMO.[/QUOTE]

All I have to say is " WOW", coming from you this is great news, they have recently dropped the price on the 480GB Vector 150 to 389.00 with a 30 mail in rebate, so I took the plunge, I will be using it in my next build. Thanks Wendy.