"Not standard" optical units

vbimport

#1

Hello,

I would like to have a list of the units that are not quite designed in a standard way.
I mean … one CDWriter unit is always one CDRom unit.
One DVDWriter is also one CDWriter an so on.

But …
I know about one exception:
First bluray writer, Pioneer BDR-101 is bluray writer/reader and DVDwriter/reader BUT is not a CDWriter.

Do you have knowledge of some other units like this ?
Maybe some DVDWriters that are not also CDWriters ?
Or some other unusual designs ?

Thanks!


#2

At the end of the 1990s Kenwood made a series of high-speed CD-Rom drives which could achieve up to 72x read speed.

Instead of increasing the rotation speed, they used a novel technology to read from several points of the disc (6?) simultaneously. They were seriously fast, in real use more than twice as fast as a 36x drive. But struggled with audio CDs & CD-R and were discontinued in 2001(?).

There used to be some interesting tests of them on the old CDSpeed2000 web site (try archive.org).


#3

Another unusual (possibly unique) drive was the [B]NU Tech DDW-081/082[/B] dvd writer, which could change the booktype on DVD-R/RW discs.

OC-Freak reviewed it for CDFreaks back in 2004.

This is what [B]Spath[/B] had to say on the matter:

[QUOTE=spath;613613]Already discussed on various places. Bitsettings for - doesn’t make sense since
the booktype cannot be changed on - discs. The trick discussed here is
explicitly violating the - standard and is in practice not equivalent to bitsettings
on +. Such discs can still be detected as -R discs, and the only reason why
dvdinfopro doesn’t show this is that its author is the same guy who is
promoting this trick.[/QUOTE]

These drives are rather rare. One appeared on Ebay here in the UK last year.


#4

Another very rare model was the [B]Plextor Premium-G[/B].

This was a variant of the standard drive intended for use in music CD kiosks.

The system (can’t remember the name) would burn the music of your choice onto a special Taiyo Yuden gold CD-R with a hologram. The hologram was to prove that although the disc was a CD-R, the music had been paid for. The Premium-G was modified to detect the hologram and confirm to the software that the special CD-R had been used.

I don’t know if there was any hardware modification to the drive, or if it was just implemented in firmware.

I don’t recall ever seeing one of these drives, they were obviously not intended for general distribution. Also I think the kiosks were only used in America, and then only for a brief time. But a job lot of the special CD-R discs was on Ebay last year.

Are these are the sort of drives you are interested in? :flower:


#5

Another unusual optical drive, the [B]Panasonic LKM-KB23[/B].

This is a current drive. I don’t know if it unique, but it is only one I know of which supports Panasonic’s ADA (Advanced Disc for Archive) format.

As well as ADA-R/RE discs, it can read & write BD-R/RE and DVD-R/RW/RAM. But the specification indicates that it cannot write to DVD+R/RW and CD-R/RW discs, only read. (And we all though the DVD format war ended a decade ago in stalemate.)

It has been around since at least 2010, but here is little information available about ADA. The discs are housed in cartridges, like DVD-RAM (and designed to be compatible with DVD-RAM automated disc libraries). They have the same capacity and speed rating as BD-R/RE and are available in SL & DL variants. I don’t know if they are basically BD-R/RE discs in a cartridge, or if there are other technical differences.

Would love to own one of these drives, but they are rather pricey.

http://www.digistor.com/Archive-Solutions/ADA_Drives/Internal-Blu-ray-ADA-Drive-SATA-Advanced-Disc-Archiving


#6

Thanks Ibex!
Nice new information to know :slight_smile:
That info about Premium-G is not quite I was initially looking for.
I was searching for something that you said about that Panasonic LKM-KB23.
I want to create one application for management of optical units.
And … it’s important to me to have one object oriented approach.
For me is very important to know that some optical unit like Pioneer BDR-101 is not a CDWriter even if is a DVD writer and … as you said about that Panasonic drive, that it cannot write to DVD+R but can read DVD+R.

As much information I have about these exceptional units, as better my design approach will be.


#7

Ah, I see. I thought you were asking about unusual drives as a collector/enthusiast. :doh::o

Isn’t it possible to send a command to drives to query their capabilities?

Software like Opti Drive Control and Nero Infotool can retrieve accurate information on the read/write capabilities of drives released long after the software was last updated.


#8

:slight_smile: I am one collector :slight_smile:
But for better management of my units, I want to have the possibility to add capabilities not by making query to the unit.
I mean, I want to add one GGW-H20L to my database.
Then I know what capability I must check.
Maybe, on some later release … I can make usage of connecting the unit and make the query, but if the unit is dead, I must introduce the needed information, and maybe also to mention that that unit, identified by some unique serial number, is actually dead.
I’m just at the very beginning of the application :slight_smile:


#9

Ah, I see.

I’m sure there was another early Blu-ray drive(s) which could not handle CDs (due to the CD laser diode being omitted).

Two early Blu-ray models which spring to mind are the Panasonic SW-5582 and Samsung SH-B022 (although I’m not sure if that was ever released as a finished product). But a quick search suggests that they could handle CD-R/W & DVD±R/W.

Maybe I’m thinking of a BD-Rom drive.

Might be worth browsing the Myce reviews archive.


#10

That early Panasonic drives always had such flaws. :smiley:

[B]Don’t mix up PROFESSIONAL drives with consumer drives!![/B]


#11

:slight_smile: Nice observation chef about Professional drives.
I will us a check-box for these :slight_smile:


#12

You’ve read about Archival grade drives like Pio DVR-S201 and Pioneer BDR-PR1MC??


#13

Yeah, I know about them. I would like to have one of these :slight_smile:


#14

You could get the Pio S201 at least for a fair price within ebay these days. shipping costs from overseas are high, so try to get one from europe mainland…

Would like to buy a Nu 081/82, but just found one, even from overseas. :frowning:


#15

Thanks chef
I’ve found one eBay.de item for S201. But still too expensive for me because I do not have SCSI and … not sure if I will make such investment (SCSI card + S201) :slight_smile:


#16

Hello, I saw your message regarding this Panasonic drive, Digistor no longer sells them and they are no longer be manufactured - can you possibly direct me to someone who may have some of these for sale?
Best Regards, Need2Find

[QUOTE=Ibex;2746154]Another unusual optical drive, the [B]Panasonic LKM-KB23[/B].

This is a current drive. I don’t know if it unique, but it is only one I know of which supports Panasonic’s ADA (Advanced Disc for Archive) format.

As well as ADA-R/RE discs, it can read & write BD-R/RE and DVD-R/RW/RAM. But the specification indicates that it cannot write to DVD+R/RW and CD-R/RW discs, only read. (And we all though the DVD format war ended a decade ago in stalemate.)

It has been around since at least 2010, but here is little information available about ADA. The discs are housed in cartridges, like DVD-RAM (and designed to be compatible with DVD-RAM automated disc libraries). They have the same capacity and speed rating as BD-R/RE and are available in SL & DL variants. I don’t know if they are basically BD-R/RE discs in a cartridge, or if there are other technical differences.

Would love to own one of these drives, but they are rather pricey.

http://www.digistor.com/Archive-Solutions/ADA_Drives/Internal-Blu-ray-ADA-Drive-SATA-Advanced-Disc-Archiving[/QUOTE]