Not convinced about SSHD? Watch it transform a sluggish OS

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#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Not convinced about SSHD? Watch it transform a sluggish OS[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/08/SSHD-vs-SSD-frame-95x75.png[/newsimage]

In this video, we take a look at how an SSHD transforms a near 4 year old OS that takes over 4 minutes to boot and launch the web browser at its home page.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/not-convinced-about-sshd-watch-it-transform-a-sluggish-os-68512/](http://www.myce.com/news/not-convinced-about-sshd-watch-it-transform-a-sluggish-os-68512/)

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#2

Excellent Pod cast Sean. Extremely informative. Thank you


#3

All good information, but it doesn’t address the benefits and cost vs performance gain of just going with a decent SSD. Granted an SSD will be smaller than the tested SSHD, but for the test purposes it wouldn’t matter. And given the realities of today’s HDD storage needs, a 500GB is worth little more than a 128/256GB SSD. So I’d have preferred to see the same tests run on a good SSD as a comparison.


#4

Sshd slaughter traditional hdd for loading operating system/programs, but ssds mop the floor with sshds.

In oz, you can get a 1TB sshd for the same price as a low end 256GB ssd.
I’d still take the ssd.
256GB is really enough for a laptop, even to rip a few blurays to.

Desktops don’t need sshd. Throw in a cheap 64GB or 128GB ssd and pair it with a cheap as chips hdd for capacity.


#5

[QUOTE=debro;2697100]Sshd slaughter traditional hdd for loading operating system/programs, but ssds mop the floor with sshds.

In oz, you can get a 1TB sshd for the same price as a low end 256GB ssd.
I’d still take the ssd.
256GB is really enough for a laptop, even to rip a few blurays to.

Desktops don’t need sshd. Throw in a cheap 64GB or 128GB ssd and pair it with a cheap as chips hdd for capacity.[/QUOTE]

That only works for those not storing alot of movie data or files. To those that need space HDD will still beat SSD in space/price. Perfomance doesn’t make up for lack of storage space…My trusty HDD laptop and Desktop HDD are still working and not til they no longer made or found then I go to SSD but for cost/byte/space HDD still has the lead…


#6

if you can afford to go all SSD, then by all means go that route (should be a no brainer :wink: ). Otoh if you need more space capacity than what you can afford with SSD, yet also need more performance for read data than what a HDD can provide, then go with or look into and learn about SSHD/HHDDs.

Fwiw have been using HHDDs for three years, as well as have some systems with all SSD, and some with all HDD, some with mix of SSD, HHDD/SSHD and HDDs…

Different tools for various tasks, things we talked about in this weeks pod cast:


#7

In my main PC where I do use an SSD as the primary drive (SanDisk Extreme 240GB), I am very tempted on replacing one of my secondary hard disks with a 2TB SSHD for a few reasons.

This 2TB hard disk has over 350,000 files, many of which are photos and documents. It takes several minutes to do a full search for files. With an SSHD, after a few searches, the sectors containing the directory records would end up in the SSHD, reducing search times to just a few seconds.

Likewise when backing up the HDD, the directory indexes containing time-stamp information will end up in the cache, so most of the time backing up will be spent backing up new/changed files than seeking all these indexes to compare with the last backup.

I also have years of e-mail archives on the hard disk and I regularly need to search old archives. With an SSHD, the indexes would end up being cached.

I did give Dataplex a test run a year ago, which is software based caching that uses a spare SSD as its cache and it sure made a very noticeable improvement with my secondary HDD. However, what made me stop using it is that I could not access the HDD outside of the OS, which meant if I had an OS crash, I would have to use data recovery software to access its content. Even still, there could still be data on the cache SSD not yet written to the HDD. With an SSHD, no software is involved, so any OS can access that drive exactly like with a regular HDD or SSD.