No O/S because no HDD driver; No driver because no O/S!

vbimport

#1

Hello,
I have installed a 80 Gbyte Hard Drive in a Dell 4150 Laptop.
It replaces a crashed drive, therefore there is no Operating System.
When I try to run the O/S disk I receive the message “No Hard Disk”.
I think all the HDD needs is a driver, which I downloaded onto a thumb drive using another PC.
How can I install the HDD driver with no O/S?
Thank you:eek:


#2

You may want to check the laptop manual regarding “Hardware Replacement”

In some laptops you need to do a refresh in the BIOS so the drive can be recognized. Not sure about yours, you may want to research the process.


#3

The new hdd requires appropriate firmware to be run in your Laptop, same counts for ODDs.


#4

Firmware? Bios?

How about something simple?

DID you format the drive in another computer before physical installation?

If anyone has a windows installation disc that recognizes an UN-initialized & Unformatted drive when trying to install an operating system I’d like to see it.

AD


#5

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2696518]Firmware? Bios?

How about something simple?

DID you format the drive in another computer before physical installation?

If anyone has a windows installation disc that recognizes an UN-initialized & Unformatted drive when trying to install an operating system I’d like to see it.

AD[/QUOTE]

Um, doesn’t ALL proper Windows installation disks work on unformatted drives?

I don’t know what do you mean with “uninitialized” drive.
But I’ve never had any problems, pop a drive in, check that it is recognized in bios, boot from a windows cd, it asks you to format, then install.


#6

[QUOTE=chef;2696509]The new hdd requires appropriate firmware to be run in your Laptop, same counts for ODDs.[/QUOTE]

No they don’t, and no it doesn’t count.

I have a few laptops here, and I have changed HDDs and ODDs for them. Just pop them in, and check that they are recognized in BIOS.

If not, check for BIOS updates etc.

HDD(or ODD) firmware reside in the chip in the HDD. So how could you run/update firmware for it if BIOS doesn’t recognize it?


#7

It turned out that the relacement HDD wasn’t any good either, but thanks for responding.:doh:


#8

[QUOTE=Mastus;2696560]No they don’t, and no it doesn’t count.

I have a few laptops here, and I have changed HDDs and ODDs for them. Just pop them in, and check that they are recognized in BIOS.

If not, check for BIOS updates etc.

HDD(or ODD) firmware reside in the chip in the HDD. So how could you run/update firmware for it if BIOS doesn’t recognize it?[/QUOTE]

Master/slave/cable select for parallel ATA drives in laptops is sometimes set in firmware; this was actually a big issue. If the design of the motherboard could not tolerate a slave drive placed as a master (or a master drive as the slave), and/or if the other drive (HDD or ODD) was set as master or slave, installation of the wrong drive would result in either one or both drives not being recognized. (If that didn’t happen, then the drives would function improperly, with reduced performance or other quirks).

Searching on Google suggests this laptop could come from that era, so it was a worthwhile reply, since we weren’t sure if the replacement drive was D.O.A. then.


#9

[QUOTE=Mastus;2696560]No they don’t, and no it doesn’t count.

I have a few laptops here, and I have changed HDDs and ODDs for them. Just pop them in, and check that they are recognized in BIOS.

If not, check for BIOS updates etc.

HDD(or ODD) firmware reside in the chip in the HDD. So how could you run/update firmware for it if BIOS doesn’t recognize it?[/QUOTE]

Wow, how hilarious…


#10

a shiny new hard drive that has never been previously formatted will usually not be “seen” by the bios when “Booting” on an OS installation disc.


#11

I’ve always seen working disks being recognized by a working BIOS. Formats, partitioning - all of that only occurs after BIOS recognition.

I remember learning how to set LDA (??) zones and sector sizes for drives in the mid-to-late '80s.


#12

[QUOTE=Albert;2696569]Master/slave/cable select for parallel ATA drives in laptops is sometimes set in firmware; this was actually a big issue. If the design of the motherboard could not tolerate a slave drive placed as a master (or a master drive as the slave), and/or if the other drive (HDD or ODD) was set as master or slave, installation of the wrong drive would result in either one or both drives not being recognized. (If that didn’t happen, then the drives would function improperly, with reduced performance or other quirks).

Searching on Google suggests this laptop could come from that era, so it was a worthwhile reply, since we weren’t sure if the replacement drive was D.O.A. then.[/QUOTE]

How I could forget that. Had one laptop which had just that problem. Sorry :o


#13

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2696902]a shiny new hard drive that has never been previously formatted will usually not be “seen” by the bios when “Booting” on an OS installation disc.[/QUOTE]

If HDD is not “seen” by BIOS, you cannot install OS to it. (If trickery must be involved (master-slave issue), so be it, but the principle is the same. You must get the BIOS to recognize the drive -> then install OS).

Are you sure you are proposing that every single HDD bought from the store will have to be formatted in another computer before putting it to the target computer?