No hardware acceleration

vbimport

#1

I have an HP Pavilion that has Windows 7 Home Premium on it and the hardware acceleration doesn’t work.

I typed dxdiag in the search box and opened the DirectX Diagnostic Tool. Under the System tab it shows that the DirectX Version is DirectX 11. Under the Display tab it shows three DirectX features all of which show to be unavailable. I found something on a Microsoft site that said if these three features are not enabled to do so. But Microsoft can’t seem to give me an answer as to how to fix the problem

So, can anyone here help me with an answer as to how to get hardware acceleration working on this computer Thanks.


#2

Can you give a full model number and/or part number for the computer?

Any idea of which graphics driver is currently installed?


#3

[QUOTE=Albert;2770219]Can you give a full model number and/or part number for the computer?

Any idea of which graphics driver is currently installed?[/QUOTE]

The device manager says it is a “standard VGA adapter”. Microsoft updates hasn’t found another driver, and when I try to update the driver in device manager it says that “the best driver is already installed”. I have even tried uninstalling and reinstalling the driver a couple of times.

The only thing I know about the computer is that it is an HP Pavilion originally running XP updated to W7. W7 works great on the computer except for the hardware acceleration not working.


#4

No no, I mean which HP Pavilion is it? The model number has to be printed somewhere on it. If it’s a desktop, there’s probably a model printed on the front. If it’s a laptop, it’s probably printed on the top. And there’s probably a sticker on the back (desktop) or bottom (laptop) with a more specific model number and part number.


#5

[QUOTE=Albert;2770239]No no, I mean which HP Pavilion is it? The model number has to be printed somewhere on it. If it’s a desktop, there’s probably a model printed on the front. If it’s a laptop, it’s probably printed on the top. And there’s probably a sticker on the back (desktop) or bottom (laptop) with a more specific model number and part number.[/QUOTE]

It’s a 746c. Sorry.


#6

No worries. Sorry if I was a bit terse. :wink:

After looking for the specs for the 746c…

The computer uses an Intel 82845GE (845GE) northbridge. The Pavilion 746c doesn’t include a discrete graphics card, but makes use of the graphics provided by the 845GE. This graphics adapter is referred to as Intel Extreme Graphics.

However, Windows XP was the last version of Windows with official support for Intel Extreme Graphics. Windows Vista included built in support for the graphics adapter, but Intel didn’t provide a separate driver, and this driver was not included in Windows 7. Also of note is that Vista could not run Aero (the fancy UI with transparency) on the fairly underpowered graphics hardware, which is probably why support was dropped.

Now, when I search, I see people saying two things:

  1. you can manually install the old Windows XP driver under Windows 7 (using device manager to load from the correct .inf file). This will at least give some acceleration to support higher resolutions and decent computer use, but you will not get stellar performance.
  2. if you can find the Vista driver extracted by some helpful problem solver, you can manually install that. (Similar to situation 1)
    …Force installing drivers may require a little extra effort if Windows rejects an unsigned driver, and the OS could just fail to boot with the shoehorned driver.

Your other option would be to buy a newer graphics card to use in a PCI (not PCI Express) slot or, preferably, in the AGP slot.

I would personally try to get the Windows XP driver from Intel’s site (download a zip if possible, or just extract the contents from the exe but DON’T let Intel’s installer try to run).


#7

Thanks Albert, I can install drivers, but what you suggest is a bit over my head at my present learning curve. But, I will see what I can do. If there is problems I will get the card as you suggested. Thanks again.


#8

Even with the legacy driver installed, capabilities are going to be limited, Intel “Extreme” graphics date back to when Intel graphics were a bad joke.

The question is, what can you find in AGP that would do?
Not sure if there are any to be had new these days, saw a couple of Geforce 6200 used on ebay for under £10 - not the most powerful card, but then not too much aggro with power supply rating, but oodles better than the GeForce FX5200/FX5500 that are also quite common


#9

[QUOTE=Matth;2770333]Even with the legacy driver installed, capabilities are going to be limited, Intel “Extreme” graphics date back to when Intel graphics were a bad joke.

The question is, what can you find in AGP that would do?
Not sure if there are any to be had new these days, saw a couple of Geforce 6200 used on ebay for under £10 - not the most powerful card, but then not too much aggro with power supply rating, but oodles better than the GeForce FX5200/FX5500 that are also quite common[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the reply, will look into that.


#10

[QUOTE=Albert;2770275]No worries. Sorry if I was a bit terse. :wink:

After looking for the specs for the 746c…

The computer uses an Intel 82845GE (845GE) northbridge. The Pavilion 746c doesn’t include a discrete graphics card, but makes use of the graphics provided by the 845GE. This graphics adapter is referred to as Intel Extreme Graphics.

However, Windows XP was the last version of Windows with official support for Intel Extreme Graphics. Windows Vista included built in support for the graphics adapter, but Intel didn’t provide a separate driver, and this driver was not included in Windows 7. Also of note is that Vista could not run Aero (the fancy UI with transparency) on the fairly underpowered graphics hardware, which is probably why support was dropped.

Now, when I search, I see people saying two things:

  1. you can manually install the old Windows XP driver under Windows 7 (using device manager to load from the correct .inf file). This will at least give some acceleration to support higher resolutions and decent computer use, but you will not get stellar performance.
  2. if you can find the Vista driver extracted by some helpful problem solver, you can manually install that. (Similar to situation 1)
    …Force installing drivers may require a little extra effort if Windows rejects an unsigned driver, and the OS could just fail to boot with the shoehorned driver.

I would personally try to get the Windows XP driver from Intel’s site (download a zip if possible, or just extract the contents from the exe but DON’T let Intel’s installer try to run).

I would personally try to get the Windows XP driver from Intel’s site (download a zip if possible, or just extract the contents from the exe but DON’T let Intel’s installer try to run).[/QUOTE]

[I]I would personally try to get the Windows XP driver from Intel’s site (download a zip if possible, or just extract the contents from the exe but DON’T let Intel’s installer try to run).[/I]

Albert, found the driver from Intel and downloaded the zip. Ran it and it would not install, naturally. I have two graphics cards, one is a PCI the other an AGP, but different from the AGP slot in the computer; so it would not work and the computer would not boot from the PCI card.

So, before I buy another card, I would ask that you explain this phrase from you post: [I](download a zip if possible, or just extract the contents from the exe but DON’T let Intel’s installer try to run).[/I]

I have no idea what this means, but as I thought about it I thought maybe I should learn what you are talking about as it might come in handy at another time. Thanks.


#11

Download zip. Extract contents.

Now…

Go to device manager.

Select the graphics accelerator (currently listed as… Standard VGA Adapter?)

Try to update driver, but select the option to point to the driver yourself. So “Browse my computer for driver software”, then select “Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.”

Eventually, you get to a window listing compatible drivers. This window also has a button labeled “Have disk”. Click “Have disk”, then Browse to the folder with the contents from the zip. Then hop inside the win2000 folder.

From there, select the .inf file, in this case “ialmnt5.inf” and try to install.

If you get errors, jot them down.


#12

[QUOTE=Albert;2770403]Download zip. Extract contents.

Now…

Go to device manager.

Select the graphics accelerator (currently listed as… Standard VGA Adapter?)

Try to update driver, but select the option to point to the driver yourself. So “Browse my computer for driver software”, then “Select Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.”

Eventually, you get to a window listing compatible drivers. This window also has a button labeled “Have disk”. Click “Have disk”, then Browse to the folder with the contents from the zip. Then hop inside the win2000 folder.

From there, select the .inf file, in this case “ialmnt5.inf” and try to install.

If you get errors, jot them down.[/QUOTE]

Outstanding! Done and did. That is my first experience with installing drivers that way. But it fixed the problem. After installing the inf file and restarting the computer I opened Solitaire to see if the acceleration was working. When I first starting playing the game it was a bit jerky, then, it started working correctly.

I have a couple of motherboards that would run W7 but because I couldn’t get HA to work, I replaced them with another board because I couldn’t get a driver to install. Now I will bench test the boards, installs the HA driver as you explained and see what happens.

I buy used boards, test them and use them. Heck, I just bought a board for $15 dollars and the board runs W10 with no problem.

Thanks Albert for the explanation.