Nexus 7 vs. other tablets?

vbimport

#1

Hi everyone. :slight_smile:

I am considering buying a 1st gen Nexus 7, but i hear the other tablets are good. I’m still making my mind up lol. I know there is the 2nd gen Nexus 7, but I hear there is a 3G issue with it. :slight_smile:


#2

I use an Nexus 7 (1st gen) at work, and they are excellent tablets. The screen is nice, and I usually get a full days work out of the battery charge.
Being a Nexus, you will also have the latest Android version, so that’s a plus. They just rolled out the Android Jellybean, 4.3 a week ago.

At home I use an Ipad. :slight_smile:


#3

Thanks :smiley: I will buy my Nexus 7 from JB Hi-Fi while my Nexus 4 will be bought from Harvey Norman. :slight_smile:


#4

I agree with Dee, I bought a 1st gen Nexus 7 a few months ago and like it a lot, would buy it again. I checked out most other tablets at Sam’s Club and Best Buy and I though the N7 was better than all but maybe the ipad which was a lot more expensive, not worth the extra bucks IMO. I chose the 7" over the 10" for convenience. I just know that I wouldn’t carry the 10" around everywhere because it was too big, but I do the 7. The 7 is plenty big to view good video and have watched movies from Netflix and you’re not tied to itunes for everything.


#5

[QUOTE=nemesis_007;2695706]Thanks :smiley: I will buy my Nexus 7 from JB Hi-Fi while my Nexus 4 will be bought from Harvey Norman. :)[/QUOTE]

Haven’t heard about any problems with 3G and couldn’t find anything about this online but the generation 2 seems to be wiping the floor with all the rest going by the reviews.

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/reviews/tablets/3461196/new-nexus-7-2-review/

What’s the issue with 3G? :confused:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

As far I can tell from reading around this tablet doesn’t come with 3G, so the only 3G issue it could have is the lack of a 3G model.

Then again, as pretty much all recent Smartphones have tethering capability and people generally carry their phone everywhere they go, it doesn’t really make sense getting a separate 3G SIM/subscription for a tablet - Just switch to a tariff or operator that includes a decent data package. For example, my phone provider 3 has unlimited data on its €20/month prepay plan, so I just enable the “Portable Wi-Fi hotspot” feature whenever I carry my tablet or laptop about. This way the one package covers my phone, tablet and laptop. :slight_smile:


#7

A lot of it depends on what you plan on using the tablet for. For me the 7 inch screen was just too small to watch things on, so I needed to go with a 10 inch. Not sure what the HDMI adapter/cable options are for the Google Nexus 7, but that is a definite factor. I hook my Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 up to my TVs all the time for streaming from Netflix and 1channel (highly recommend this app for a tablet with or without HDMI), so make sure you have that option available to you as you wouldn’t believe how handy it is.

To my knowledge no android tablet has anything beyond wi-fi. Not a big deal to me since I refuse to pay for wireless data service and can get what I need from home or another wi-fi hotspot, but if you are one of those people who has to be glued to the i-net everywhere you go, then it is a concern.

The one thing that kills the Google tablets for me is the lack of the micro-sd port. Despite it’s clean version of Android and sharper resolution there is no cost effective way to add substantial storage to the device and while the standard 16GB (or 32 GB if you pay the huge extra $ for the 10 inch model with 32GB). While that is not a major concern for most things (ie streaming, downloading apps and browsing the net), it is a major concern if you would like to store a large library of music or avi/divx movie files. I use my tablet for a portable video player for the kid (and ourselves when we alternate driving) on long trips and there is no way I could do that without being able to add a 32GB micro-sd card for dirt cheap to the tablet. IMHO that is one of Android’s biggest selling points over the Ipad (cheap expandable storage) and the fact that Google left it out is a no-go for me. Obviously though as I originally stated, it depends on your needs/wants.


#8

@Jesterrace: (For the U.S.A.)

There are versions of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab lineup featuring cellular data. Sony’s Tablet Z comes in an LTE version, as I found out with a quick search. ASUS has some model(s?) with cellular support, including the 2013 Nexus 7 (though the LTE version either hasn’t been released, or is in short supply at the moment. However, it is listed and is expected to arrive before year’s end). Amazon has a Kindle Fire HD variant with LTE (again, just found that out).

Are there other tablet manufacturers who really matter at the moment? Most others simply serve the low end but don’t carve out a real name for themselves, or do not attempt to support anything beyond WiFi.


#9

Interesting, didn’t know that one. I have only ever seen the wi-fi only versions (including the expensive Note models).


#10

I probably wont need 3G anyway, I could input my location and look at other places anyway. If I wanted a GPS, I would use a navigational device such as a “TomTom” :slight_smile:


#11

[QUOTE=Seán;2695748]As far I can tell from reading around this tablet doesn’t come with 3G, so the only 3G issue it could have is the lack of a 3G model.
[/QUOTE]

You’re right Seán!

I checked this out and the Wi-Fi only versions are first to the market but there’s a 4G LTE version due to be released soon.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#12

[QUOTE=nemesis_007;2695838]I probably wont need 3G anyway, I could input my location and look at other places anyway. If I wanted a GPS, I would use a navigational device such as a “TomTom” :)[/QUOTE]

Actually the Google Maps/GPS feature will work as long as you load the map while on wi-fi. Leave it open and go and it will walk you through step by step even if there is no cell/data/wi-fi service. My wife and I tested this out recently on a 124 mile trip into the mountains and it was spot on with our location/progress, etc and gave us voice prompts. Keep in mind that the whole route that we traveled was devoid of cell/data service. Did it with a $95 pre-paid Android phone.


#13

Would tablet-owners describe their tablet-uses for me? Jester’s given this good “124 mile mapping” description.

I wonder what uses your tablets offer you that a smart-phone won’t - can’t. (There will be some benefits that the larger screen offers which aren’t matched, of course. E-Reading, for example, is fairly useless on a 40-character wide screen for a smart-phone. I guess if that’s all I had, well…)

I’m wondering what the experience has shown you to be unique uses along the way.

(And no, “carrying 4 cups of coffee on it” won’t be among my list of ‘unique uses’. Not even a German chopping block qualifies… not really.)


#14

[QUOTE=Jesterrace;2696177]Actually the Google Maps/GPS feature will work as long as you load the map while on wi-fi. Leave it open and go and it will walk you through step by step even if there is no cell/data/wi-fi service. My wife and I tested this out recently on a 124 mile trip into the mountains and it was spot on with our location/progress, etc and gave us voice prompts. Keep in mind that the whole route that we traveled was devoid of cell/data service. Did it with a $95 pre-paid Android phone.[/QUOTE]

That’s very interesting and I’m sure a lot of people, including myself, probably weren’t aware of that so that’s a great tip! :clap:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#15

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2696203]Would tablet-owners describe their tablet-uses for me? Jester’s given this good “124 mile mapping” description.

I wonder what uses your tablets offer you that a smart-phone won’t - can’t. (There will be some benefits that the larger screen offers which aren’t matched, of course. E-Reading, for example, is fairly useless on a 40-character wide screen for a smart-phone. I guess if that’s all I had, well…)

I’m wondering what the experience has shown you to be unique uses along the way.[/QUOTE]It’s another high tech toy to play with. I don’t have an Android phone, so I’m using my Nexus 7 (2013) to dip my toes into the world of Android. I’ve found it’s useful for casual web surfing while watching TV instead of having a notebook PC on my lap. I also plan to use for video watching when traveling.


#16

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2696203]Would tablet-owners describe their tablet-uses for me? Jester’s given this good “124 mile mapping” description.

I wonder what uses your tablets offer you that a smart-phone won’t - can’t. (There will be some benefits that the larger screen offers which aren’t matched, of course. E-Reading, for example, is fairly useless on a 40-character wide screen for a smart-phone. I guess if that’s all I had, well…)

I’m wondering what the experience has shown you to be unique uses along the way.

(And no, “carrying 4 cups of coffee on it” won’t be among my list of ‘unique uses’. Not even a German chopping block qualifies… not really.)[/QUOTE]

I have both an Android Cell Phone and Tablet.

Reasons to get a Tablet over a Smart Phone?

  1. No cell data service is required for a tablet. The thing that has killed smart phones for me until now is the required additional monthly expense. I have learned how to get by with wifi just fine and it doesn’t cost me anything beyond the cost of my land-line i-net service, which most people have regardless. For a regular monthly data service the bare minimum cost for myself and my wife would run about $30 a month more than what we pay for our regular voice plan. Obviously if you have to have data access everywhere you go and are already paying for it that isn’t a concern, but for those of us who are content to just use wifi it saves quite a bit of money.

  2. With a 10" tablet screen size it’s a no brainer for watching shows/movies and having a keyboard that doesn’t require a toddler’s fingers to type things in. I have very thin fingers and my little Android Phone is a pain to type anything in (even horizontal). Also for me personally I can’t imagine playing games on anything smaller than my tablet.

  3. Not sure how it is with the phones but the Samsung Galaxy 10 inch tablets (and to my knowledge the Google Nexus 10 tablets) have very cost effective HDMI adapters that work great. I couldn’t live without mine after finding a great TV Show/Movie database app for the android. We can either watch it on the 10 inch screen if we don’t want to be bothered with hooking it up to the TV (or if we are on the go and have access to wifi service) or we can hook it up to the big screen and watch it like regular TV.

Now given these factors, one might wonder why I bothered with an Android Phone. I discovered that with the pre-paid smart phones that there are a few options that will allow you to keep a regular pre-paid voice service (no data purchase required), but still have the ability to access and load up things on wifi. The sole reason I purchased the pre-paid Android? Airtime Free wifi calling. We don’t have a land line at home so we are always using our airtime when at home. With the wifi calling it cuts down significantly on the amount of airtime we use/need, therefore we can drop to a cheaper plan and possibly do away with our regular cell service as a number of calls we make are at home. Don’t get me wrong, wifi calling isn’t 100% perfect, but then again neither is cell service. The difference is that you pay a lot less for it. I guess technically I could do the wifi calling on the tablet but holding a 10 inch tablet up to my head or trying to do speakerphone with it on my lap (and my head bent over to speak into the mic) just really isn’t practical.

Now that said, if you have regular data service and are fine without having a 10 inch screen, I would get either the Galaxy S4 (5.5 inch screen) or the new Samsung Mega (6.3 inch screen) that is coming out. No point getting a 7 inch tablet with options like that.


#17

Thanks for these scenarios.


#18

Not a problem, always glad to be of help when I can.


#19

Samsung will soon release Nexus 10-like tablet of their own, the Galaxy Note 10.1 2014. Same resolution of 2560 x 1600. Nexus 10’s not sold in South Korea.


#20

I’ve just started using Android. My Nexus 7 (2013) is an interesting little toy, and should make a reasonably good ebook reader.

But getting it to work with external storage has been interesting to say the least. And I’ve got the benefit of several programs designed to make that process as easy as possible. And yet, it wasn’t just a cakewalk.

Sideloaded 4.4…what fun. :rolleyes:

Then used Wug’s Nexus Root Toolkit to unlock and root the device so I could then install Stickmount. Woof. Seriously, there’s a reason I gave up trying to use Linux and all of this is giving me bad flashbacks.

I think my first “I finally get it” moment was when I could see just how much the Android environment has been carved up into small feudal fiefs, with the various groups trying very hard to wall off their subset of users from other sources of software. And I’m using what is basically the stock version of Android, which should be the most open one available. Google still attempts to dominate the software, and some of the installed apps will not work without joining Google+, which means, I will NEVER use those apps.

This whole system of control and observation pisses me off a bit. Which is why I’m doing a lot of research on good alternative applications. One of which is a very nice ebook reader app, Aldiko, which I have been using with free sci fi ebooks from Baen.

Next up I’ll need a good media player…without ads!

Don’t like Chrome, and frankly web surfing has been somewhat disappointing, even with Firefox w/Adblock +.