Newly bought Panasonic BD-R's

vbimport

#1

Hi folks,

I’ve managed to get a spindle of Panasonic LM-BRS25LT50 MEI-T02-001 for a good price on eBay from a Japanese seller. A couple of questions after receiving the spindle.

  1. Without having a disc quality check drive, do these disks look genuine?
  2. Wonder about the Stamper date being 2007. Does this indicate disks have been sitting unused since 2007? And if so would the media therefore deteriorate significantly?

Keep in mind that quality burns are just as important as disc longevity for my uses.

Cheers!

Disc burned @ 4x using ImgBurn 2.5.8.0.


Unique Disc Identifier : [BD-R-SL:MEI-T02-001]

Disc Type : [BD-R SL : Class 0 - Version 1]
Manufacturer Name : [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd.]
Manufacturer ID : [MEI]
Media Type ID : [T02]
Product Revision : [001]
Stamper Date : [March 2007]
Layer Info : [1 Layer (L0) : 25.03 GB (23.31 GiB) Per Layer]
Blank Disc Capacity : [12,219,392 Sectors = 25.03 GB (23.31 GiB)]
Recording Speeds : [1x , 2x , 4x]

[ DVD Identifier V5.2.0 - http://DVD.Identifier.CDfreaks.com ]


ImgBurn 2.5.8.0:

BD Disc Information:
Disc ID: MEI-T02-001
Disc Type: BD-R
Disc Size: 120 mm
Disc Class: 0
Disc Version: 1
Disc Time Stamp: 03/2007
Number of Layers: 1
Layer Type: Writable
DVD Layer Present: No
CD Layer Present: No
Channel Bit Length: 74.50 nm (25 GB Per Layer)
Push-Pull Polarity: Positive
Recorded Mark Polarity: HTL
BCA Present: Yes
Maximum Transfer Rate: Not Specified
First PAA of Data Zone: 131,072
Last PAA of Data Zone: 1,658,494


#2

Hello,

if Your Panasonic spindle looks like the one in the linked picture, it should be the genuine stuff. You should find this sign 日本製 on Your spindle, which means: Made in Japan.

I can´t explain the meaning of the stamper date, but I wouldn´t worry about longevity and deterioration when using these Panasonic BD-R, it´s the best blank medium You can get.:iagree:

Kind Regards


#3

A reply to one question: the reported stamper date doesn’t tell you when that particular disc was actually made. I have yet to see a stamper date reported past 2007 if it is reported at all, so either the stamper used was made back in 2007 (not a problem), or the stamper is newer than that but they just didn’t change the date (again, not a problem).

You can’t tell from this information whether the discs are genuine. You’d have to physically inspect the medium. That said, I don’t see why you would have received any fakes of Panasonic-branded, Panasonic-made media (Panasonic = Matsushita/Matshita).


#4

Thanks for the replies. I’ve had a look at the identification written on the inner edge of the disk and can see the following markings:

  • 4R2SL2B02C30R (fairly sure the ‘0’ is a zero not an ‘O’ alphabetical character)
  • AVC6
  • and a standalone sign that I can best describe as a stylised bold upside-down number ‘2’ character.

And yes the case looks exactly the same as manufacturer’s linked site with “原産国 日本”.


#5

With the code you mentioned roughly matching up with the hub code (or stamper code? Not sure which is which, since I can’t see the discs myself) mentioned in the above thread, and with the packaging stating “Origin: Japan”, they should be real.


#6

That post made me realise there are two different visual identifications on the disc:

Inscribed on the transparent plastic (Hub Code?): Z4D3703A0601266
Inscribed on the reflective dye layer (Stamper Code?): 4R2SL2B02C30R AVC6

All-in-all these disks look legit to me. Now let’s see how long they last me. ImgBurn offered to burn them @ 10x however I believe it’s wiser to burn them at the rated speed of 4x.


#7

I’m actually interested in this spindle myself. Would these Panasonics would fare well in a Lite-On iHBS112?

Trying to get as close in quality to the archive grade (or the ones in that French gov’t test) as I can, which not easy to find. I came from some branded Smartblu BD-R 25gb and would like something better.

Also, anyone know a good Panasonic 50gb BD-R? These 2x ones look alright and inexpensive. Speed of the burn doesn’t matter much to me. Unless of course there’s a good, reasonably priced 50gb Panny somewhere.

I’ve been sifting these forums and japanese shopping sites almost all day and I am confused. Here’s hoping I haven’t deviated too much from the thread :wink:


#8

[QUOTE=discfan;2695675]Trying to get as close in quality to the archive grade (or the ones in that French gov’t test) as I can, which not easy to find. I came from some branded Smartblu BD-R 25gb and would like something better.

Also, anyone know a good Panasonic 50gb BD-R? These 2x ones look alright and inexpensive. [/QUOTE]

50 years archive grade labelled Panasonics are hard to find. LM-BR50T20N is what I’ve also concluded is the logical step for a quality set of 50GB BD-R media. Will wait for the price to come down, although something tells me those disks have been around for long enough not to expect any major price drops…

As an alternative archival grade media other than BluRay have a look at Mitsui Gold or Verbatim UltraLife Gold disks.


#9

The Panasonic BD-R50 2x are the best DL media You can buy for a decent price.
They are sometimes slightly better than SONY BD-R50 2x with the same mediacode.

But Pansonic BD-R50 4x are good, too.
You can also find them labeled as Sony, Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim BD-R50 4x.


#10

[QUOTE=discfan;2695675]Trying to get as close in quality to the archive grade (or the ones in that French gov’t test) as I can, which not easy to find. I came from some branded Smartblu BD-R 25gb and would like something better.[/QUOTE]Well, no one knows how the SmartBlu discs will fare. It’s also unclear if the cheaper and more prevalent Panasonic discs are even close to as good to the 50 year archival ones in the French test. If you exclude the archival Panasonic media due to extreme price and rarity, the confirmed longest lasting discs are the Sony NN3. Unfortunately, AFAIK, they’re also effectively impossible to find. You could buy Sony BD-R discs from 20 different stores in different types of packaging with different marking, labelling, etc and might not get any of them.

So that pretty much puts us back at back to square one. The presumed highest quality discs (based on initial burn quality scans from ODC) may or may not have the best longevity and it’s impossible to speculate. Early on people reported Ritek BD-R discs going bad. On the other hand, no one has reported Verbatim BD-R discs going bad. Based on this prior to the French study no one would have guessed that Ritek discs would outlast Verbatim discs because in general the Verbatim discs have better initial burn scans and are considered top tier.

There’s no evidence that the discs with best initial quality scans will last the longest and there’s actually evidence to the contrary. So while FTI, Panasonic, and Verbatim BD-R tend to offer some of the cleanest looking initial burn quality scans their longevity is unknown. We know the Verbatims aren’t as good as others from the French test, but it’d be a wild guess to speculate how other untested discs compare. It would be nice to have a similar test done with a much larger sample size of brands / media codes.


#11

Sony NN3 manufactured by RITEK :Z in Taiwan the longest lasting Discs? :disagree:
I dare to doubt that.:rolleyes:


#12

[QUOTE=katraine;2695721]Sony NN3 manufactured by RITEK :Z in Taiwan the longest lasting Discs? :disagree:
I dare to doubt that.:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]Doubt all you want, but they were the 2nd best BD-R in the French study behind the 50 year archival Panasonic. Do you have any empirical test data that disputes those results or shows any other non-archival disc lasts longer?


#13

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2695722]Do you have any empirical test data that disputes those results or shows any other non-archival disc lasts longer?[/QUOTE]

I [B]know[/B] that SONY NN3 once were good when they were [B]Made in Japan[/B].:iagree:
SONY NN3 made in Taiwan were good in the beginning, but then…:Z

Did they say anything about the version tested in the French study?
Who guaratees that the quality will last?

Do You know that SONY BD-R25 6x are meanwhile also manufactured by MBI in India with a MBI mediacode?

So good luck in finding the long lasting high quality Sony discs from the French study.:wink:


#14

[QUOTE=katraine;2695729]So good luck in finding the long lasting high quality Sony discs from the French study.;)[/QUOTE]You’re preaching to the choir. I already went over that.

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2695716]…the confirmed longest lasting discs are the Sony NN3. Unfortunately, AFAIK, they’re also effectively impossible to find. You could buy Sony BD-R discs from 20 different stores in different types of packaging with different marking, labelling, etc and might not get any of them.[/QUOTE]


#15

And this all is the reason I’d trust Panasonic, TDK, or FTI for real quality burns. I will always prefer Made in Japan over any other origin because of innate quality control system and choice of materials. Sony plays the name game too much, and move around their fab based on cut corners and demand. FTI is acceptable because supposedly they have the TDK license and use Japanese materials. That’s why I went with Smartblus last year. I should have stocked up. Still, it is outside the domain of the parent company in UAE, and a 50gb is a risky form of media for my data.

So, what I have is a fleeting [I]trust[/I], and not loyalty, since even the big, respected companies who would normally not deviate from their method of origin, may do so on their 25gb. From what I hear on these forums, some Panasonic 25gb discs will also relocate to Moser Baer. Eww. I don’t think they could afford to take that chance with 50gb. But who knows?

Right now, I am looking for real Japanese Panasonic stock that is quality, even if it might be a few years old. My data depends on it. Without too much hunting, should I shoot for a lot of 25gb like the 50ct LM-BRS25LT50 or a smaller batch of 50gb discs like something from here? Or any other suggestions?


#16

[QUOTE=discfan;2695735]Right now, I am looking for real Japanese Panasonic stock that is quality, even if it might be a few years old. My data depends on it. Without too much hunting, should I shoot for a lot of 25gb like the 50ct LM-BRS25LT50 or a smaller batch of 50gb discs like something from here? Or any other suggestions?[/QUOTE]Well, where are you located? There are plenty of sellers on the Amazon.com marketplace selling Made in Japan Panasonic 4x 25GB BD-R’s out of Japan. There are also a lot of sellers out of Japan on ebay selling the same blanks shipped worldwide. The 50 pack spindle seems to have the most bang for the buck. For dual layer BD-R, the That’s / TY discs mentioned here are similarly sold on the Amazon marketplace and Ebay out of Japan. They are similarly priced to the Verbatim DL discs sold out of Japan that some people have been buying, but seem to burn better.


#17

Located in the US.
The funny thing about those listings is that seller will always emphasize when something is actually made in Japan, and leave that information out on other media. In this case, the TY/That’s listings say “media from Japan” but he doesn’t specifically note it was made there like in this listing for example. Also, I stay the hell away from the Verbatim gamble. I will assume Taiwan, China, or India if I don’t see Japan.

I’m a stickler. I dunno, I’d better order something soon.


#18

When in doubt ask the seller.

I’m still trying to wrap my mind around the wonderful world of Panasonic media. The consumer discs used to have 50 year Archive life claims printed on the packaging. However, it’s subsequently been removed. After digging deeper, it seems the media in the French test was consumer grade w/ the 50 year life logo on it, not the business class “archival grade” discs. Panasonic’s website makes a big deal that their discs have 50 year Archive Life and even provide a link to some vague TUV certification. Of course the certificate has no distinguishing model numbers for which discs were tested and seems to cover just about every BD-R disc they make.

Did they change something about the media to make the 50 year archive life not apply? Did they simply remove it over potential liability? What a mess…


#19

[QUOTE=discfan;2695675]I’m actually interested in this spindle myself. Would these Panasonics would fare well in a Lite-On iHBS112?

I bought the same disc from a Japanese seller and they burn fine on my Lite-on iHBS312.



#20

Today I received 10 Verbatim Blank Blu-ray Discs 50GB BD-R DL 4x bluray from Tokyo Japan Shop (jp-gift) but they display the following info in the ImgBurn 2.5.8.0:

HL-DT-ST BD-RE BH16NS40 1.00 (SATA)
Current Profile: BD-R

Disc Information:
Status: Empty
State of Last Session: Empty
Erasable: No
Free Sectors: 24,438,784
Free Space: 50,050,629,632 bytes
Free Time: 5430:52:34 (MM:SS:FF)
Next Writable Address: 0
MID: MEI-T02-001
Supported Read Speeds: 2x, 4.2x, 6.2x, 8x
Current Read Speed: 2.6x - 6.2x, 6.2x - 2.6x

BD Disc Information (L0):
Disc ID: MEI-T02-001
Disc Type: BD-R
Disc Size: 120 mm
Disc Class: 0
Disc Version: 1
Disc Time Stamp: 03/2007
Number of Layers: 2
Layer Type: Writable
DVD Layer Present: No
CD Layer Present: No
Channel Bit Length: 74.50 nm (25 GB Per Layer)
Push-Pull Polarity: Positive
Recorded Mark Polarity: HTL
BCA Present: Yes
Maximum Transfer Rate: Not Specified
First PAA of Data Zone: 131,072
Last PAA of Data Zone: 1,658,494

BD Disc Information (L1):
Disc ID: MEI-T02-001
Disc Type: BD-R
Disc Size: 120 mm
Disc Class: 0
Disc Version: 1
Disc Time Stamp: 03/2007
Number of Layers: 2
Layer Type: Writable
DVD Layer Present: No
CD Layer Present: No
Channel Bit Length: 74.50 nm (25 GB Per Layer)
Push-Pull Polarity: Positive
Recorded Mark Polarity: HTL
BCA Present: Yes
Maximum Transfer Rate: Not Specified
First PAA of Data Zone: 2,535,808
Last PAA of Data Zone: 4,063,230