Newbie would like to know how to identify media

vbimport

#1

I just bought a NEC 2500 and a bundle of 25 no-name DVD-R. I do not know how I can identify what these discs are.

Could anyone tell me how I can do this?

As this has probably been covered a hundred times, a reference to posts that already explain it would be appreciated.


#2

Start with the media FAQ


#3

You can use one of several different programs to do this. I use DVDInfoPro, a free program available at, of all places, www.dvdinfopro.com :slight_smile:

This will tell you the identification codes on the disks, most of which are easy to decipher. TY stands for Taiyo Yuden, Ricoh is self-explanitory, CMC is CMC Magnetics and generally bad news, etc. There is a whole list of dvd’s tested and organized by manufacturer’s codes at the top of this forum, and you can get more user feedback over at www.dvdrhelp.com

Don’t worry about asking questions—lots of helpful people around here.

You’ve got a good drive, but even so, it’ll work better with good quality disks rather than no-names. Look around the forums a bit, and you’ll soon find out which ones are better. Taiyo Yuden, Maxell (made in Japan), Ricoh/Ritek and MCC’s made in Singapore are high on the list.
(MCC is Mitsubishi Chemicals, sold under the Verbatim brand).


#4

Kerry, thanks for the info. This is exactly what I was looking for.


#5

OK

Once I find the manufacturer, how do I find the model so I can check it on this page

http://www.plextor.com/english/support/media_708.html


#6

Crash

That’s an interesting list you’ve got there. Haven’t seen that one, but I think those numbers are manufacturer’s id codes for their packaging, not the id codes on the disks themselves. They won’t correspond to anything you get off the disks with DVDInfoPro.

You can generally go by the type of disk, the manufacturer’s id code on the disk, and the speed of the disk. For example, you might buy some Verbatim Datalife +R disks made in Singapore with the id code MCC 002. These are 2.4x-4x speed disks made by Mitsubishi Chemicals and should work fine in your Plextor.

Any of the manufacturers included on that list should work ok, though I haven’t heard of Victor personally, and TDK’s marketed in the US can be made by several different companies.

The main thing to remember is that you can’t buy simply by brand. The major brands keep shifting suppliers. At the moment, there are some general guidelines, but even they aren’t set in concrete:

  1. Japanese disks are reliably good, whether they are marketed by Fuji, Maxell, Plextor or even Verbatim. Most of the Japanese disks you’ll see are -R. The +R disks made in Japan are rare in the US. If you want a local source for -R Japanese disks, look in Walmart for the Maxells, and Best Buy for the Fuji 10 packs, but make sure they say Made in Japan on the side.

  2. Most of the +R disks you’ll find in the US are made in Taiwan, and many, if not most will be made by Ricoh/Ritek. Lots of people like these Ricoh disks—my NEC 1300a doesn’t for some reason, so I avoid them. But there is little or no consistency under the major brands. One time you’ll get Ricoh, the next bunch may be CMC or Prodata. If you want Ricoh/Ritek disks, I suggest you order them specifically online.

  3. The best Verbatim +R disks are made in Singapore, so that’s a good strategy for buying that brand.

Lots of other tips you can pick up here in the media forum.