Newbie question about DVD's

vbimport

#1

Having asked for a copy of the video of my nephew’s activities, I have been emailed a folder containing several files with names such as VIDEO_TS.BUP, VIDEO_TS.IFO and VIDEO_TS.VOB among others.

I think that I sort of vaguely understand this but my specific question is about the nature of the difference (if any) between a DVD-ROM disk and a video DVD disk.

If I burn these files in their file structure as data to a DVD-ROM disk – just as I archive, say, MSWord documents for backup purposes - will I have essentially created a video DVD? Or is there something more to it than that?

Put another way, is it only the structure/names of the files and directories that makes it a video DVD or is the format somehow different?


#2

Not sure I understand you correctly, but all video DVD’s have two main folders; VIDEO_TS and AUDIO_TS.
Put all your files in VIDEO_TS folder.


#3

I understand that part of it – what the disk structure should be.

My question is about how that structure gets there. Does it matter?

Put another way, here is a DVD which has VIDEO_TS and AUDIO_TS directories in it’s root directory. Is this DVD therefore and automatically recognized by a video DVD player as being a video DVD simply by virtue of having that structure?

Or is there more to it? Must a disc be burned as a video DVD in order to be recognized as a video DVD? Or can it be burned as a DVD-ROM with the correct directory structure and therefore, because of the directory structure alone, be recognized as a video DVD? (without going into what those directories contain because that’s not my question).

I am asking about byte-level disk formatting if that makes it any clearer. Is there, for example, a requirement that the first two bytes of the second sector be 0FFEx in order for this disk to be recognized as a video DVD, whereas a DVD-ROM would have 0FFFx in that position? Things like that.


#4

if you burn a disc with that structure as a “data” disc it is still a video dvd. if I’m not mistaken, burning as a “video dvd” (ie using that option in whatever program you use) mainly prepares the program to check to make sure the structure is correct or create that structure if you’re burning say avi files in nero vision express or something.

if i understand the question correctly, then anything with that structure is automatically a video regardless of how you burn it. this assumes that all of the files are intact and the structure is 100% correct. if there’s something wrong with the files or the structure, burning as a data dvd will assume that it’s the correct data you want to burn and won’t make sure it conforms to dvd-video specifications.

does that help?


#5

It does, thanks!