New York City calls on students to fight digital piracy

vbimport

#1

New York City calls on students to fight digital piracy.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2011/09/ZSBkCp.jpg[/newsimage]This week marks a new, innovative approach to the fight against digital piracy, as New York City has clearly spoken on the behalf of the 700,000 New York artists that work in the creative fields with the Create the Next Spot contest.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/new-york-city-calls-on-students-to-fight-digital-piracy-51878/](http://www.myce.com/news/new-york-city-calls-on-students-to-fight-digital-piracy-51878/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Another brainwashing campaign to keep obscene profit in the pockets of the controlling corporations in the face of the new, digital reality.

2.8 billion dollars? Give us a break–there is no loss of revenue from a digital copy, legal or otherwise. Think about it. Say I sell a dvd I created to 1 person, who in turn copied it 20 times and gave said dvd to 20 friends. What have I lost? Nothing, as long as you deal in reality and not hypotheitcals. In reality I made 1 sale. It’s complete fantasy to think I should have made 21 sales.

In the days of analog, listeners made tape copies from the radio, but tapes didn’t bring down the music industry.

Studios were certain the introduction of the VCR would destroy their business and television was equally doomed.

The internet won’t destroy art and creativity (and by extension jobs), but it will shift the balance sheet from one pocketbook to another and that’s really what this is all about.


#3

[QUOTE=TMP1;2604281]Another brainwashing campaign to keep obscene profit in the pockets of the controlling corporations in the face of the new, digital reality.

2.8 billion dollars? Give us a break–there is no loss of revenue from a digital copy, legal or otherwise. Think about it. [B]Say I sell a dvd I created to 1 person, who in turn copied it 20 times and gave said dvd to 20 friends. What have I lost?[/B] Nothing, as long as you deal in reality and not hypotheitcals. In reality I made 1 sale. It’s complete fantasy to think I should have made 21 sales.

In the days of analog, listeners made tape copies from the radio, but tapes didn’t bring down the music industry.

Studios were certain the introduction of the VCR would destroy their business and television was equally doomed.

The internet won’t destroy art and creativity (and by extension jobs), but it will shift the balance sheet from one pocketbook to another and that’s really what this is all about.[/QUOTE]

If those friends wanted the DVD you created they would have came to you for purchase thus more revenue to you, however when the person who you sold to gave it to them for free means a loss to you :iagree:

Have a nice day :flower:


#4

IF they wanted—how do you know they did? Any loss is purely imagined, unless you have proof…do you have proof? I’d have a really nice day if you could tell me how to turn imagination into reality!


#5

[QUOTE=TMP1;2604293]IF they wanted—how do you know they did? Any loss is purely imagined, unless you have proof…do you have proof? I’d have a really nice day if you could tell me how to turn imagination into reality![/QUOTE]

:confused: My reply was to your hypothetical question so I need not have nor show proof, however if your statement or question was a fact and not hypothetical as you posted “Say I sell a DVD I created” then my reply would be valid and a fact.

Since this is not a debate forum I have nothing more to say on this subject to someone who seems to have no concept of business economics, again have a nice day :flower:


#6

I think the proof would be in the visible amount of downloads and seeds for digital downloads. Even one percentage point - which I think we can all agree 1% would have spent money to acquire - of all of the illegal downloads amounts to a tremendous amount of $$ that the company, artist, designers, etc. do NOT get, despite putting in the work for their work. And an artist’s work is their own.


#7

StormJumper: you don’t like debate, okay. You clearly don’t know what you’re talking about-and lucky for you-that’s not debatable.


#8

lolz, I think they’re referring to the fact that Borders had to liquidate after not finding an investor… apparently book sales are dwindling fast. no figures on offsets from audible books and digital media. there’s also no offset from the last of the bookstores (Barnes and Noble) rai$ing prices since they are the only major chain in town. the only thing keeping them in check is online book sellers-- most of which don’t have to collect sales tax if they have no presence in your state.

btw, more money is lost in music & movie revenue than books. this industry has not been hit as much by piracy. generally only the MOST POPULAR or MOST EXPENSIVE items would ever tend to get pirated or worth a pirate’s time to scan or repack book data from original sources (as in decode encryption subscription information) and then release as a pirated “ware”.


#9

Support the companies, which software you actually enjoy!

KEYWORD:…Actually enjoy!

Software Return Policy=You Got Screwed!


#10

The fact that the expected gained profit was not met, does not mean it is lost profit.

This is the ultimate fallacy that is still strong in the people’s minds.

For the rest, piracy is wrong like any other illegal activity, but that has never stopped the public from being creative and obtaining their wishes in any way they seem fit.


#11

“The problem with quotes on the internet is that many are not genuine.” - Abraham Lincoln

“I like That Mr Belvedere” -George Washington:bow:


#12

[QUOTE=TMP1;2604293]IF they wanted—how do you know they did? Any loss is purely imagined, unless you have proof…do you have proof? I’d have a really nice day if you could tell me how to turn imagination into reality![/QUOTE]It’s still theft, and no better than going into a shop and helping yourself to the stock without paying.

You don’t think so?
If you answer no, then perhaps you can supply us with your bank account details, and then we can all just help ourselves to your hard earned cash. I mean, if its in a bank account, how are we supposed to know if you really want the money or not?


#13

[QUOTE=AIRBUD7;2604396]

Software Return Policy=You Got Screwed![/QUOTE]

This why I don’t buy a ton of software or even CDs or DVDs anymore. You buy it, open it and end up not enjoying it or finding out it doesn’t fit your need. You’re then stuck with it.

It is nice to see that more and more software companies are offering the 30 day trials though.


#14

Anti-Piracy organizations will claim that every pirate copy represents a lost sale, at full RRP.
Pirates will claim that every pirate copy is free advertising that might lead to legitimate purchases.

Part of the problem, is “what is ownership” - when LP’s had a sleeve that was often a work of art itself, and when software came in a box with a substantial printed manual, there was a big difference between what you bought, and what you got if a friend made a copy for you.

Nowadays, it’s just some bit of gobbledegook you type in to make it go.

Anyway I shall deprive Microsoft of a sale of Office Suite - I’ll use OpenOffice.

Basically, in the digital age, I think the old models are doomed, and in the case of software, maybe selling support services is the way forward, rather than selling the software itself.


#15

[QUOTE=StormJumper;2604290]If those friends wanted the DVD you created they would have came to you for purchase thus more revenue to you, however when the person who you sold to gave it to them for free means a loss to you :iagree:

Have a nice day :flower:[/QUOTE]

That is a false premise because you are ASSUMING without any proof of fact that the person or persons who have aquired the “pirated copy” would have actually bought the work in question.

or that they had the available funds to have done so.

in court this would and should be objected to on the basis of
"facts not in evidence" and/or “based on supposition.”

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2604372]lolz, I think they’re referring to the fact that Borders had to liquidate after not finding an investor… apparently book sales are dwindling fast. no figures on offsets from audible books and digital media. there’s also no offset from the last of the bookstores (Barnes and Noble) rai$ing prices since they are the only major chain in town. the only thing keeping them in check is online book sellers-- most of which don’t have to collect sales tax if they have no presence in your state.

btw, more money is lost in music & movie revenue than books. this industry has not been hit as much by piracy. generally only the MOST POPULAR or MOST EXPENSIVE items would ever tend to get pirated or worth a pirate’s time to scan or repack book data from original sources (as in decode encryption subscription information) and then release as a pirated “ware”.[/QUOTE]

Borders had an obsolete buisness model that failed in the face
of these three facts:
1)that people simply don’t read books as much as they used to
2)when people do the research to find the title & author of a book they want
it’s only a few additional mouse clicks to have the book simply appear in their mailbox in 48-72hours
3)and while the shift to e-readers is still ongoing that is taking a bite out of borders buisness as well.

For #2 & #3 you can probably blame Amazon.

Amazon killed borders as thoroughly as bad management at dorders did.

How do I know there was bad management at Borders?
They are out of buisness aren’t they?

[QUOTE=justcallmebob;2604481]This why I don’t buy a ton of software or even CDs or DVDs anymore. You buy it, open it and end up not enjoying it or finding out it doesn’t fit your need. You’re then stuck with it.

It is nice to see that more and more software companies are offering the 30 day trials though.[/QUOTE]

Even Microsoft give you a 30-day trial of an operating system before you are forced by "activation"
to lock it to that particular system.

Basically giving you 30days to determine if there are unresolvable conflicts on a particular system
with that new OS, no you can’t return it if you fail, but frankly for what they charge for an OS and all that it does I consider an OS to be a bargin compared to some other software, like Adobe Acrobat or the professional version of M$ office.

AD


#16

Yo AllanDeGroot

My reply that you quoted was in response to a statement made in a hypothetical way by TMP1…

[QUOTE=TMP1;2604281]Say I sell a dvd I created to 1 person, who in turn [B]copied it 20 times and gave said dvd to 20 friends…[/B][/QUOTE]

So I did not assume nothing but rather stating a fact if such
hypothetical action had actually happened.

When quoting someones quote with a negative response try reading the statement that the quote was in reference too.

Have a nice week :flower:


#17

Oh BTW AD in response to…

without any proof of fact that the person or persons who have aquired the “pirated copy” would have actually bought the work in question.

AD

When one acquires something it is because they want or wanted it so yes if the pirated content was not available the odds of a purchase being made is extremely high or do you just go around acquiring things you don’t want.