New Yamaha AVR model RX-V663

Very soon we will start seeing the newest Yamaha AVR models coming out. One of the most interesting is the RX-V663. This will replace the current RX-V661 and have the same retail price. You can see the official web page HERE.

Essentially, the 663 adds HDMI 1.3 and video up-conversion, which are outstanding additions to a receiver in this price range. It also adds all the HD audio decoders and the ability to accept bitstreamed HD audio for decoding, (including 7:1 bitstream), or MPCM. It also will support 1080p/24 HDMI video.

Previously, you needed to double the price to get these features in any of the Yamaha models.

For a comparison of the 661 and 663 models, you can look HERE.

For folks trying to break into the AVR game with a minimal investment, this is a great option and will play nice with any of the current HD players, PS3, you name it. I have a 661 and can attest to the awesome sound quality and ease of use. The Yamaha AVRs also offer the option of using a 7:1 audio decoder on all 5:1 signals, which is unique in this price range and a real plus for anyone with a 7:1 speaker setup.

Looks like a great receiver. Any clue on the release date. Pretty much made my decision to go with the Onkyo TX-SR605 but if the RX-V663 is going to be released very soon I will hold off on buying it. Google got 5 hits 2 were here and one at AVS.

Here is one link to try.

[QUOTE=crossg;1999549]Looks like a great receiver. Any clue on the release date. Pretty much made my decision to go with the Onkyo TX-SR605 but if the RX-V663 is going to be released very soon I will hold off on buying it. Google got 5 hits 2 were here and one at AVS.[/QUOTE]

Looks like April. The Yamaha has a very important advantage over the Onkyo, in that it can matrix 7:1 audio from 5:1 with DD PLIIx, ES and EX decoders. The Onkyo cannot do this. If you have a 7:1 setup and HD audio, you’ll want this feature. The 661 will be found soon at discounted prices, and really only lacks HDMI 1.3 and the HD decoders, which you don’t have to have.

Ordered this one a couple of weeks back. Just waiting for it to come on in.

http://www.yamahamusic.com.au/products/avit/htsystems/YHT-785B.asp

[quote=Womble;1999738]Ordered this one a couple of weeks back. Just waiting for it to come on in.

http://www.yamahamusic.com.au/products/avit/htsystems/YHT-785B.asp[/quote]
Wow, price in AU is that high?

For that price (equal to US$ 2,000) here in the US we can get more features!

Womble, I would suggest to reconsider. I have an 8 years old Yamaha receiver and still doing a good job so this little thing last for many many years. If you plan to go high def in the future (even not near future), I would suggest getting a receiver that at least has HDMI inputs. And don’t forget about HD audio capabiliities that offer lossless audio (Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD Master Audio etc) but of course they are supported through HDMI.

Perhaps you can get a separate receiver and speakers if that is a cheaper route?

Anyway, the Yamaha V661 or Onkyo SR605 here in the US is about US$ 400-500. :wink:
The new Yamaha V663 looks very interesting.

Thanks for the Info Dan. The reason I was going for the Onkyo was I get a sweet deal and they don’t sell Yamahas there. Half of this stuff I don’t understand. I wan’t to make sure the receiver will pass through 1080P/24 with out changing my screen size which I have read the Onkyo’s tend to do. My Toshiba A-30 doesn’t support lossles Audio so it seems I may be buying an A-35 that does through HDMI (get that cheap too).

[ul]

[LIST]
[li]1080p-compatible HDMI ( 2 in/1 out )[/li]> [li]Supports Deep Color ( up to 36 bit ) x.v.Color, a double speed Refresh Rates of 120Hz and 1080p/24Hz transmission, and Auto Lip-Sync compensation[/li]> [li]Analog video to HDMI digital video upconversion and deinterlacing with TBC[/ul][/li]
[/LIST]What’s up with the 120Hz refrersh rate. (thought that was a TV setting) Also with upconverting will this be done twice once by the player and then again by the receiver or does it just pass through?(Setting Maybe?)
Sorry brand new to this type of receiver and the more I read the more confusing it becomes.:slight_smile:

[QUOTE=crossg;2000217]My Toshiba A-30 doesn’t support lossles Audio so it seems I may be buying an A-35 that does through HDMI (get that cheap too).
[/quote]
Sure it does. There’s no difference in the A30 and A35 except the analog 6-ch outputs on the A35. They both will also send MPCM through HDMI, already decoded.

Also with upconverting will this be done twice once by the player and then again by the receiver or does it just pass through?(Setting Maybe?)
Sorry brand new to this type of receiver and the more I read the more confusing it becomes.:slight_smile:

Upconverting or upscaling simply refers to fact that the receiver will convert and upscale an analog video input to HDMI. Also means that you can get the receiver’s OSD over HDMI. HDMI video signals are simply passed through. You may also choose to just pass the analog video through to your monitor as-is, if the monitor has a good quality upscaler. Svideo gets passed to Svideo, or can be converted to HDMI or even converted to component. Or, all 3 at once.

It’s not a setting, but a frequency.

Remember this.

What you end up with is a smoother flowing picture, but it’s dependant on the source, and the particular T.V’s ability to deal with the input.

The most common refresh rate for today’s Televisions are 60hz for NTSC-based systems and 50hz for PAL-based systems. However, with the introduction of some Blu-ray Disc and HD-DVD players that can actually output a 24 frame per second video signal, instead of the traditional 30 frame per second video signal, new refresh rates are being implemented by some television display makers to accommodate these signals in the correct mathematical ratio.

If you have a TV with a 120hz refresh rate that is 1080p/24 compatible (1920 pixels across the screen vs 1080 pixels down the screen, with a 24 frame per second rate). The TV ends up displaying 24 separate frames every second, but repeats each frame according to the refresh rate of the TV. In the case of 120hz each frame would be displayed 5 times within each 24th of a second.

In other words, even with higher refresh rates, there are still only 24 separate frames displayed every second, but they may need to be displayed multiple times, depending on the refresh rate.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 120hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 5 times every 24th of a second.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 72hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 3 times every 24th of a second.

To display 30 frames per second on a TV with a 60 hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 2 times every 30th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 50 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 2 times every 25th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 100 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 4 times every 25th of a second.

If the television is also required to do a 24 frame per second to 30 frame per second or vice versa frame rate conversion, then you also have to deal with 3:2 or 2:3 Pulldown as well where the 24 frames of film will be stretched onto 30 frames.

So your high definition player is capable of 1080p/24. So this receiver will properly relay that source to your T.V., and the T.V. will properly display the source.

So if your refresh rate is slower, the amount of frames repeated is less, and then you picture is not as smooth as it can be.

:cool::cool:

[quote=zevia;1999987]Wow, price in AU is that high?

For that price (equal to US$ 2,000) here in the US we can get more features!

[/quote]

Don’t worry the price that I got was nowhere near the listed price.

Plus / unfortunatly it isn’t for me. I get to experience it but don’t have to pay for it.:stuck_out_tongue:

Also about 90% of all stuff in Aus is more expensive than most places. Something that you have to live with.

I thought so too!

Here are the Audio specs from the Canadian Toshiba Site

X = Has feature
-= Doesn’t have

[B]A-30:[/B]
Audio Ethernet 10/100 1
Audio D/A’s 24-Bit/192Khz
Built-In Dolby Digital X
Built-in Dolby Digital Plus Decoder X
Built-in Dolby True HD Decoder X
Built-In DTS Decoder X
Built-in DTS-HD Decoder (Core Only) X
Built-in DTS-HD Decoder Master Audio Reader -
5.1 Channel Analog Audio Output -
Dynamic Range Control X
Loseless Audio Pass Thu via HDMI -
HDMI Audio support for 5.1 L-PCM X
Multi-channel Signal Management -

[B]A35:[/B]
Audio Ethernet 10/100 1
Audio D/A’s 24-Bit/192Khz -
Built-In Dolby Digital X
Built-in Dolby Digital Plus Decoder X
Built-in Dolby True HD Decoder X
Built-In DTS Decoder X
Built-in DTS-HD Decoder (Core Only) -
Built-in DTS-HD Decoder Master Audio Reader X
Dynamic Range Control X
Loseless Audio Pass Thu via HDMI X
HDMI Audio support for 5.1 L-PCM X
Multi-channel Signal Management X

@platinumsword. Thanks I saw that in one of your earlier posts. Yes my TV supports 120Hz and I can set to Off, Low, Med, High or Auto. Just don’t get what the Amp has to do with 120Hz?

[quote=crossg;2000479]
@platinumsword. Thanks I saw that in one of your earlier posts. Yes my TV supports 120Hz and I can set to Off, Low, Med, High or Auto. Just don’t get what the [B]Amp[/B] has to do with 120Hz?[/quote]Sorry. Meant to say Receiver not AMP which could be taken as Auto Motion Plus.

@crossg

Your HD player is capable of outputting it’s source at 1080p/24 in the 120hz frequency range.

Your HDTV is capable of receiving a source in the 120hz range.

We have established this, that each frame from the source (120hz range) is repeated 5 times every 24th of a second. [smoother picture]

Now instead of you directly connecting, you are now relaying through the receiver that let’s say only supports 72hz. ( hint: each frame is repeated 3 times every 24th of a second.[ not as smooth picture])

Now what do you think would happen when you output 120hz to 72hz to something that will support 120hz?

:cool::cool:

Actually, most AVRs are simple HDMI repeaters, what comes in also goes out. If you see a receiver rated for 1080p/24 at 120Hz, generally it will refer to the upconverted/upscaled analog video that the receiver is sending out via HDMI. The receiver should also give you options for setting the video to match your monitor. So many receivers will pass 1080p/24 at 120Hz even if they do not have upscaling. Of course there are always exceptions. I can’t say if this, or any receiver, will take HDMI video at 1080i or 720p and convert it to 1080p. Or similarly take 60Hz and convert to 120Hz. I’m not sure you would want it to anyhow, as less processing is usually better. A lot depends on the quality of the video chip in the receiver, but as a rule you shouldn’t expect to find high-end video processing in a $500 receiver, or even a $1500 one. It’s there primarily for converting low-end analog inputs to HDMI for those whose monitors have limited inputs.

When you are talking about hz, We are not referencing about the scaling process at this time. The higher the frequency range allows the source to be repeated more often within that frequency. Cdan has referred to it as a repeater, well that is correct.

So if all three of your components are capable of moving data in the 120hz range then, then the chain of the source will be equally repeated giving you the smoother picture.

Remember now, we are getting into minuscule differences here.

:cool::cool:

Exactly! To make it simple. I would like the Receiver for Audio and switching, not to be an extra cog in the wheel messing with my video output. So hopefully I can set the Reciever for straight pass through on the video end because I am very happy with my video quality as it is now. HD/BD player to TV via HDMI. Audio is via optical ATM.:slight_smile:

[QUOTE=crossg;2001322]Exactly! To make it simple. I would like the Receiver for Audio and switching, not to be an extra cog in the wheel messing with my video output. So hopefully I can set the Reciever for straight pass through on the video end because I am very happy with my video quality as it is now. HD/BD player to TV via HDMI.:)[/QUOTE]
Yes, the receiver should have a setting to enable or disable video upconversion. However, it may need to be switched on to be able to get the OSD over HDMI. Not sure about that, and I can’t say what the Onkyo does. But if you want 7:1 audio, don’t get the Onkyo 605.

hehe, I am having trouble restraining myself from getting a receiver and April seems like years away but I will sit on my hands until the RX-V663 is released. Hopefully the price difference between the US and Canada won’t be too much.

[QUOTE=crossg;2001330]hehe, I am having trouble restraining myself from getting a receiver and April seems like years away but I will sit on my hands until the RX-V663 is released. Hopefully the price difference between the US and Canada won’t be too much.[/QUOTE]

Well the 661 should be bottoming out, price-wise, pretty soon. Since you don’t really need the HD decoders anyhow, it’s arguable that you should buy one. Lot’s of folks have chosen the 661 over the 605 and been happy with it. The ability to over-lay a 7:1 decoder onto 5:1 sources is no small thing, since virtually all current sources are 5:1. Personally, I prefer the DD PLIIx decoder 7:1 over either the ES or EX 6:1 sound tracks. You might want to read the relevant threads at AVS for these receivers to get a feel for any common problems. The Yamahas are extremely reliable and problem free. Once the 663 is announced by Yamaha, there should be a manual for download at their site.

But let’s face it, either of these 3 choices will blow your hair back with a HD source and the right speakers. :iagree:

HERE’s the manual for the new RX-663. there’s also some more info in the dedicated thread at AVS.