New technique for optical storage allows one petabyte of data on a dvd

I just posted the article New technique for optical storage allows one petabyte of data on a dvd.

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Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/new-technique-for-optical-storage-allows-one-petabyte-of-data-on-a-dvd-67572/](http://www.myce.com/news/new-technique-for-optical-storage-allows-one-petabyte-of-data-on-a-dvd-67572/)

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I can hardly wait! Of course, if this holds 50,000 HD movies, I wonder if they’ll reduce Burn-Time Per HD Movie in half? Let’s see… that would mean I could burn 50,000 BluRays onto a single disk in about the same time it takes to burn 25,000 BluRays…

That would be, uh, hmmm… uh…

But I would quickly convert to 14Pb hard drives! Two of those would be a good start on my home-collection.

Interesting, there was a suggestion, long ago, that something like this would come along to replace hard drives. You wouldn’t worry about recovering space when you deleted something, you’d just delete it and leave it hidden on the drive. The perfect solution for trying to recover that file you threw in the wastebin emptied and then realized you shouldn’t have.

[QUOTE=kpoole;2690680]Interesting, there was a suggestion, long ago, that something like this would come along to replace hard drives. You wouldn’t worry about recovering space when you deleted something, you’d just delete it and leave it hidden on the drive. The perfect solution for trying to recover that file you threw in the wastebin emptied and then realized you shouldn’t have.[/QUOTE]

That long ago to me is something like 23 years ago. It was optical and it did mention petabyte, exabyte… and so on. I heard Australia is introducing 100 F-35s so why not have 4.7 petabypte versions of DVD ready for all those F-35s since the most important thing justifying the high cost of F-35 is its futureproof design and future air battles could require that much data on each airframe.

At any rate, I continue to focus on removing as many rotating components inside and outside my computers even this hot summer where ambient temperature could rise well above 35 degrees Celcius.

It sounds good but my thoughts are about the mechanical aspect of this & drives.
How often do the drives that do this need to be calibrated ?
How well does a disc from one drive play on another drive ?
To me it seems that off by even a little minute amount would be a major problem.
Same for any “vibration” in the environment of the drive.

My second thought is the is an "OH NO " error warning from ImgBurn at HD movie 49999.

I would how many it would take to fully backup YouTube… :wink:

It also makes me wonder what will reach the market first - a Petabyte disc or a Petabyte hard disk. At present, you would need a pretty big RAID array just to prepare the source data for the disc.

It would seem that a hard disk could be made to use this .
Maybe even like a HDD now with several discs inside .
So a multiple Petabyte hard disk .
Do I hear the same “OH NO” from the SSD market?

[QUOTE=Seán;2690687]I would how many it would take to fully backup YouTube… :wink:

It also makes me wonder what will reach the market first - a Petabyte disc or a Petabyte hard disk. At present, you would need a pretty big RAID array just to prepare the source data for the disc.[/QUOTE]

It means allowing every computer and phone user in China and India to access every Walt Disney and Paramount Pictures video locally. None of the governments responsible for the companies with enough resource to develop and mass produce those disks would make that happen in 20 years whether it’s optical or magnetic, local or wireless.

[QUOTE=Seán;2690687]I would how many it would take to fully backup YouTube… :wink:

It also makes me wonder what will reach the market first - a Petabyte disc or a Petabyte hard disk. At present, you would need a pretty big RAID array just to prepare the source data for the disc.[/QUOTE]

Not necessarily. New software for writing to such large write once media could be written to append new data to or delete sections of data from the directory of an existing disk. Of course the deletion would be either simply flagging the section as unused but unwriteable or completely writing over the section with 1s or 0s so that the old data would be completely erased.

Likely this would also mean a moving directory as it would have to be re0written to account for the changes. But, hey, you’ve got a petabye to play in what’s a few old directories lying around.

[QUOTE=Seán;2690687] :wink: … you would need a pretty big RAID array just to prepare the source data for the disc.[/QUOTE]

Source?

Not necessarily. We have a 24-foot wall with 8 shelves running the length, covered in DVD cases. The facing hallway wall is a bit longer but only has 4 length-of-wall shelves filled.

I REALLY need that 14Pb drive, lemme tell you. And an extra year to load those onto it. I would indeed like to RAID those 14Pb drives together, though. Say, 5 in a RAID5-10+. Of course, I’m not sure how many eons it’d take to rebuild it…

Hubby foolishly asks about the plans to sail away, though. “And all of that fits on a notebook, right? So we can sail off and solar-power it, right?” Yeah. Riiiight. He’s always nitpicking.

It reminds me of mars University (futurama), and the library with the largest collection of literature in the universe.

(On a pedestal) Disc1 - non fiction, Disc2 - fiction.

Curious about the seek times and loading times for a movie which is burned on the last bits of the disc’s free space…:stuck_out_tongue:

Ultra high storage for write-once only media is not practical given the ability to LOSE so much data in one GULP and how many HOURS it would need to recover such data assuming backups of the data EXIST and are free of CRC errors/corruption. Companies might want to start out with something smaller such as a reasonable multiple of the biggest hard drives we have today… 5x a 4tb hard drive is 20 terabytes- so a 50 terabyte disc would be reasonable. 1k terabytes of data would a monumental task of recovery should the disc DEEP SIX (die). 50 terabytes would be bad, but reasonable recovery time.

Let’s see, we are having a hard enough time getting good quality Blu-ray discs at a decent price…this will fly as well as a lead balloon…and that only happens if is a rock group.

Steve, yes, that, too. And all we probably need to do is create Clean Rooms for all of our houses, too, because dust-particle entries onto a platform that has such a fine reading-laser will require it. That, the quality of the media, the burn times and playbacks… anyone REALLY want to search do a search for ONE title on a 50,000 title catalog? Wanna do that twice or three times? “I know it’s in here somewhere - what’s the name again?”

You’ve hit the nail on the head there Christine but providing the access speeds and search routines are up to it that mightn’t be a problem.

It’s not that difficult finding a file on a typical PC for example amongst hundreds of thousands of files.

[B]Wombler[/B]

IMO considering the reliability of media so far that would be throwing the bathtube and sink out the window. So much on a single DVD is asking for trouble let alone the current reliable media quality so far to store. I rather have optical disc size media with but a higher quality clean room 6 or higher to use to store rather then a home user store that would introduce so many variables and error that would rather make the data storage worthless of any storage. Not only that but the equipment would be of precise nature to eliminate human errors during the storage/write process be sure retrieval is possible. Loosing a 3tb drive of video and data is bad enough if one should go that route and loosing 1PB would be a Armageddon crisis. So one should take this with a grain of salt should one pursue this course.

Back in the day, Iomega and others used “DISC CARTRIDGES” to keep dirt out and protect the disc from scratches and degradation-- a take on 3 1/2 " floppy discs. As I went back… many of my 3 1/2" floppy discs from the early 2000s have either died and/or gotten crc errors as the media degrades.

Currently, I put a cap on practicality at 50Terabytes (before we go back to plug-in HDD cartridges again). 1000k of them is INSANE and we all know these lab designs (PIE IN THE SKY)never yield consumer friendly mass produced products. Several 1tb flash media designs with read/write rates of less than 50 MB/second were also vastly impractical as well-- irrespective of the price barrier.

I remember my Gameboy used cartridges, as well. However, unlike floppy disks, which often are unreliable right out of the box these game not only cartridges work just fine, even after all these years, they also load instantly, unlike optical games, including those released at about the same time. To this day, I still prefer anything that doesn’t leave the physical media exposed, as CD’s can even take a minute amount of “abuse” before they become unreadable. And yet, people use these for long-term storage; I’ve had discs ruined within months of receiving them. Therefore, I’ve made it a habbit of backing everything up on a HARD DRIVE for long-term storage.

However, the idea of holding a petabyte in my hand still sounds cool. If that could only become practical, That’d be great.

Those IOMEGA casings were interesting but I suspect these new ones will need substantially better and more certain dust-free environments. (I’m imagining something the size of a toaster oven.)

And we see so much written about BluRay disc scratches. Just imagine loading one of these disks in (loaded with their hyped-up “50,000 HD movies” and watching Movie #6. Or #7. When does a scratch or dust-bit create issues? Does it also perturb all movies after that sector-location? “Sorry, Movie #8 has a glitch, so the remaining 49,992 movies are no longer available.”

Yes, I can see Burn Time being quite the endeavor - sort of like strapping carrots onto watery tart’s noses and all… being turned into a newt but getting better.