New mobo... how do I get my HDD to work with it?

vbimport

#1

OK, I have a new mobo and CPU and I need to ask about the HDD…

I believe that I’m right in saying that a new mobo means you need to reinstall Windows and everything on the HDD? But there’s a way to copy everything so that you don’t have to spend aeons reinstalling all of your hardware and programs?

Erk - I don’t know!:sad: Thanks for any help :slight_smile:


#2

[QUOTE=groovemeister;1999843]OK, I have a new mobo and CPU and I need to ask about the HDD…

I believe that I’m right in saying that a new mobo means you need to reinstall Windows and everything on the HDD? But there’s a way to copy everything so that you don’t have to spend aeons reinstalling all of your hardware and programs?

Erk - I don’t know!:sad: Thanks for any help :)[/QUOTE]

What do you mean specifically copy everything on the HDD? Most time it’s best to reinstall all your applications…to prevent any problems in your new system. But the most likely thing to do is first is to copy all your data or save info you created by the programs you used to create them and copy those data back onto your newly reformatted HDD and that will save you alot of recovery work. But all you really need to do is copy your data or info as I mentioned you created and load those back onto your reinstalled HDD. Reason being as you just mentioned…


#3

Thanks… so you’re saying that all software will have to be reinstalled and all I can do is backup saved data do do with those things?

I was sure that ages ago I read that you could copy pretty much everything over after the Windows install, and something to do with a ‘swap file’???


#4

Most of times, changing the mainboard requires a complete reinstall of anything (both the operative system and the softwares).

Only portable softwares can be moved simply copying the files.


#5

Good grief… this will take me days to do!

I have that much stuff installed…


#6

Too bad installed softwares require the creation of many registry keys, and these are created during the installation. Many softwares can work also copying files with no installation, but there is no warranty that they will work correctly.

Even if it’s the most boring procedure, a complete reinstall is also the safer method :slight_smile:


#7

100% correct

I usually format and reinstall everything every 6 months, yes it is a PITA and it does take a few days but you will be happy doing it because the outcome is a speedier system.

[QUOTE=geno888;1999912]Too bad installed softwares require the creation of many registry keys, and these are created during the installation. Many softwares can work also copying files with no installation, but there is no warranty that they will work correctly.

Even if it’s the most boring procedure, a complete reinstall is also the safer method :)[/QUOTE]


#8

.


#9

Wow, that is a LOT of hassle.

Still, has to be done. Best just round up all of the installers that are on the disc together.


#10

First you’ll need a new Windows licence :wink:


#11

Reinstall, its well worth it in the long run.
Be sure to use [B]new[/B] drivers, grab drivers from the manufacturers site for each chip.
//Danne


#12

[QUOTE=Cressida;2000018]First you’ll need a new Windows licence ;)[/QUOTE]

Maybe for Vista but to reinstall XP why would they need a new license when they are already doing a new install and have the license already???


#13

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2000056]Maybe for Vista but to reinstall XP why would they need a new license when they are already doing a new install and have the license already???[/QUOTE]

Changing mobo and CPU will not allow re-activation of an already used XP copy, I think, as that could be considered as using it on two different PC’s. Maybe it can be done by phone, if explained in the right way. Also depends on whether it’s an OEM or retail copy.


#14

Hi,[quote=Cressida;2000098]Changing mobo and CPU will not allow re-activation of an already used XP copy, I think, as that could be considered as using it on two different PC’s.[/quote]MS wants this that way., but this might conflict with the law in several countries.

Maybe it can be done by phone, if explained in the right way. Also depends on whether it’s an OEM or retail copy.
OEM versions must be activated via phone, since online activation has been disabled by MS for OEM versions.

@groovemeister: There is the [B]repair [/B]install option within Windows setup. You might check MS Knowledge Base for additional information. Should at least work if old and new mainboard aren’t very different.

Michael


#15

To answer the question about changing a motherbaord and Windows XP product activation.

It comes down to the type of Lic. you own. There are OEM, RETAIL, and VOLUME keys.

If you own an OEM key (like you bought a new computer and it had Windows XP on it already) then it is for that hardware only. If you change 3 major components (CPU counts as 2) then it is considered a different computer, and you need a new key.

If you have a RETAIL key (like you went to a store and bought a boxed copy of WinXP) then you can move it from PC to PC. However, if you do change 3 components, or move it from another PC (has to be uninstalled off of the old computer) you will have to reactivate windows again.

If you have a VOLUME lic. you can install it on as many machines as you want, but the total number of computers being accessed at the same time, can not be more than your total number of licenses. Many companies have software in place to keep track of all this. Or they just buy a VOLUME key that covers all thier machines.

Anyway, I can tell you that MS will activate OEM keys on different hardware if you call them to activate. However they can deny you at thier own discretion.