New Intel Ivy Bridge Extreme Chip Pricing

vbimport

#1

If you are interested in getting a Ivy Bridge-E CPU when they come out later this year, expected September, then you may be pleased to know pricing details have surfaced from VR-Zone. The first “entry” model, the Core i7 4820K, comes with a price tag of $310 USD which makes it $5 more expensive than its predecessor though it does come with a fully unlocked multiplier and a higher base clock. The Core i7 4930K, comes with a price point $39 USD lower than its predecessor despite being a better overall part. While the Core i7 4960X boasts a price about $69 USD lower than its predecessor which is welcome news given the extortionate three figure price of the Core i7 3960X.

Despite lower launch prices than predecessors Ivy Bridge-E is still a hugely expensive platform and again we will probably see the Core i7 4930K being the favourite part, much like the Core i7 3930K, because it offers nearly all the features of the much more expensive X part except with 3MB less cache and a marginally slower base clock which can be reached by overclocking.
Will you be buying Ivy Bridge-E or is it too expensive for your budget?
Image #1 courtesy of Intel and Image #2 courtesy of VR-Zone

VR-ZONE Article


#2

The price is one part of the story, the other is how many do need all the extras that come with this platform, i will assume that if you do video/audio work and you make money from it, then you dont have much to choose from.
Therefor money shouldn’t be a problem. Now if you happen to be an everyday user or an gamer, you can still get away with a 2500K (or higher) CPU and a good GPU.


#3

[QUOTE=vroom;2698305]The price is one part of the story, the other is how many do need all the extras that come with this platform, i will assume that if you do video/audio work and you make money from it, then you dont have much to choose from.
Therefor money shouldn’t be a problem. Now if you happen to be an everyday user or an gamer, you can still get away with a 2500K (or higher) CPU and a good GPU.[/QUOTE]

I would say the latter is for better words the vast majority of computer users only the truly power users will benefit from the technology and those of us just buy it because we want it but will never fully utilized the technology for it’s purpose.


#4

I use the 3960X with my LGA 2011 Sabertooth build. 6 cores and I love it. Big difference when multi tasking.:wink:


#5

I run an I7-950 with an ATI 6990 GPU…ATM,it seems still fast enough for most things I want to do on a computer…but the Ivy Bridge Extreme specs make me drool…:iagree:


#6

[QUOTE=alan1476;2698358]I use the 3960X with my LGA 2011 Sabertooth build. 6 cores and I love it. Big difference when multi tasking.;)[/QUOTE]

It is fast, very fast and it’s optimized for multi tasking, also in general it’s the ideal platform to have if you can afford it or you are a pro and time is money for you. Mainly it has to do with what you can afford and what you need.

[QUOTE=roadworker;2698360]I run an I7-950 with an ATI 6990 GPU…ATM,it seems still fast enough for most things I want to do on a computer…but the Ivy Bridge Extreme specs make me drool…:iagree:[/QUOTE]

I would love to jump in the x79 world, but my wallet has a different view on the subject. Also the 2500K is more than enough for me at the moment.


#7

I was hoping they may have updated the chipset.
There is no doubt that the IB-E is a very fast processor, but the X79 chipset is pretty far behind Z87 is some respects.

It still has only 2 native SATA3 ports, and doesn’t have any native USB3 ports.
While it may have 6 cores and a large cache, it doesn’t have an iGPU, and therefore no Intel Quick Sync.


#8

2013 Mac Pro seems to support up to two Ivy Bridge-E 6-core processors.


What I like most about this newest Mac is the cooling solution. The next I like is PCI Express SSD.

No news about X99 yet.


#9

The wiki for the 2013 MacPro seems to indicate that it could support a 12 core Xeon, which would allow for 24 physical cores. However, the way it was written was somewhat ambiguous. Also, considering that 10 core Xeons are just coming out for the general public, it seems unlikely that 12 core Xeons will be available anytime soon for those who aren’t associated with government agencies or mongo tech companies.

I am both intrigued and suspicious of that thermal core in the cigarette disposal can/I mean the new MacPro. In theory it sounds brilliant. I just wonder how well it will soak up heat. Also, the single fan design seems inadequate for cooling the amount of heat generated by dual GPU’s, dual CPU’s, etc etc. But I will be happily be wrong. It would be nice not having to worry about six million heatsinks.


#10

I think that was about two 6-core Xeons making 12 cores.

The current Mac Pro is available with one or two processors with options giving four, eight, or twelve cores. As an example the eight core standard configuration Mac Pro uses two Quad core ×8 Intel E5620007 Xeon processors @2.4 GHz, but can be configured with two Hexa Core Intel Xeon Processor X5670 @2.93 GHz.

That’s about “current” Mac Pro released on June 11, 2012. Apple doesn’t say the 2013 Mac Pro supports two times as many cores.

At any rate, it’s nice to have all the hardware inside one small footprint cylinder.