New copyright laws in Canada

According to what I read about the tarrifs put on all blank media in Canada (many years ago when blank CDr’s came out) , I believe the Supreme Court of Canada considered that to be payment for lost revenues due to copies ( of whatever) being made… Which the companies involved must have agreed to in order to get the Gov’t to put this tarrif on in the first place…Canada has just revised the laws but unless the tarriff on the blank media is removed then the Supreme Court still has the last say.

Anyone have any facts ( not opinions) on this that they can share ?

On March 19, 1998, new federal copyright legislation came into force. Among other things, the legislation provides for a levy to be collected on blank audio recording media.

It is called a levy (and not a tax) because it is not collected by any level of government, it is collected by a group representing the recording industry. In a letter to the Copyright Board of Canada released Monday, January 18, 1999, the five collectives that filed tariffs for a proposed levy on blank audio recording media announced the creation of the Canadian Private Copying Collective (CPCC).

The Copyright Board decides on the amount of the levy and what media it applies to. The CPCC submits its proposed levies and the Copyright Board holds hearings to hear any objections to the proposed levy amounts. Note that the Copyright Board CANNOT change the law, they can only determine the levy value and the media to which it will apply. The levy can be set for a 1- or 2-year period. So far, all of the periods set and requested have been 2 years.

The first time the Copyright Board set the levy was December 17, 1999.

letter to the Copyright Board of Canada

[B]http://neil.eton.ca/cpcc_rel1.shtml[/B]

Canadian Private Copying Collective (CPCC)

[B]http://www.cpcc.ca/[/B]

Some other stuff for you to check out.

Copy Right For Canadians

[B]http://www.copyrightforcanadians.ca/[/B]

[B]http://www.michaelgeist.ca/[/B]

:cool::cool:

:cool::cool:

Thanks Platinumsword…

So from what I read at the CPCC site it says that I can make copies of my stuff legally at home for my own use…

I am wondering how current this site is…

I was reading in the news last week when the new legislature was announced, that it is now illegal for me to even copy my old VHS tapes over to DVD in my own home. And it looks like there is still a levy on blank media which seems, according to what I read in the CPCC site, to placate all artists/dist/etc…involved. So I’m not even sure why this new legislation was even necessary?

As par usual all involved have made it clear as mud… At least they are getting their money…once the CPCC gets there share for administrative costs of course :wink: … I guess that’s really all that matters.

Will be looking for information on this new legislation to see what the “take” is on it now…

And again anyone that has any facts on this new Canadian legislation … It would be appreciated if a link were included in the message so I can follow up on it …

Also if I find anything conclusive (with this gov’t HA!) but will try and “IF” I do I will post it here for any interested…

BILL C-61 which has not been passed yet.

http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Docid=3570473&file=4

Kept track on Michael Geist’s blog, He is on the front lines of this issue.

:cool::cool:

I will be keeping track of the Michael Geist blog as , yes he is on top of it. Personally I think the CDN gov’t is shooting themselves in the foot as they are not very popular to start with LOL

Started looking thru billC-61 and there is alot to go thru … I would like to have it printed out but am afraid I might be breaking some law…:cop:

Yup clear as mud :clap:

Is a good thing we have high paid people to generate this garble so the GP has no idea what is goin on :bow:

An intersting quote from faircopyright.ca :

  1. [B]This Bill suffocates fair dealing and flies in the face of Supreme Court rulings of recent years[/B]. Remember “once an authorized copy of a work is sold to a member of the public, it is generally for the purchaser, not the author, to determine what happens to it?” Remember “the fair dealing exception is… a user’s right”? The Bill handcuffs user rights CCH and its sister cases urged us to cherish. Or rather, it lets us practice those rights via videocassette. I hope somebody out there still has a working VCR.