New Computer 4" and powerful

vbimport

#1

What do you think of this as your new computer


#2

It’s an interesting idea, but the proof will be in how “scalable” and how well it handles heat. $850 is a lot to justify for a AMD quad core with a shiny aluminum case, even if it has an impressive array of I/O ports(USB 2.0, USB 3.0, eSATA, DP, HDMI, etc). They justify it by saying that each unit can last 10 years. Which would be impressive if its true. Also, I wonder how easy it is to actually clean the insides.


#3

[QUOTE=yojimbo197;2683311]It’s an interesting idea, but the proof will be in how “scalable” and how well it handles heat. $850 is a lot to justify for a AMD quad core with a shiny aluminum case, even if it has an impressive array of I/O ports(USB 2.0, USB 3.0, eSATA, DP, HDMI, etc). They justify it by saying that each unit can last 10 years. Which would be impressive if its true. Also, I wonder how easy it is to actually clean the insides.[/QUOTE]
From what I have read you can change out parts in minutes without almost any computer knowledge. I would think the casing has screening for dust. But I don’t know that for a fact. It looks cool to me though.:iagree:


#4

Have you guys looked at NUCs? That’s a lot of power in a tiny box…


#5

The price alone makes it DOA, IMO. I can get a great laptop, tablet or even a desktop for $850. Also, conventional computers are not space hogs like these people want to claim. There are numerous flaws in their business model and plan with the biggest one being price.


#6

$hit after about 6 months on my desk I would never be able to find it.


#7

I was amazed at the “tough components” comments in the article. I’ve never seen a lot of computers in car-crashes, or standing up to tank-treads or steamrollers, so toughness has never been a consideration. I’ll bet a drop from a 20-story balcony turns this ‘tough’ cube into as useable a computer as any other PC or Mac would be.

Consumers aren’t replacing computers because they’re not ‘tough’ enough or lack sufficient materiel endurance, so I’m not certain why this marketing ploy is exploited. The Raspberry Pi is perfect antithesis of it - put it into a cigar box and go.

Or as accurately portrayed, stick it on a desk and in a few months, “where is it?!!”


#8

Nothing could be easier and more to my liking than this

Each Xi3 device is made up of three separate modules: one for the processor, one for how the unit communicates on a network and a third for power. This means you can upgrade any of these components – say, to swap out for a faster processor – with little effort. Just unscrew the back panel, slide out the required part, put the hatch back on and you’re done.

I unplug it from my office and take it home with little or no effort.


#9

[QUOTE=alan1476;2683499]Nothing could be easier and more to my liking than this

Each Xi3 device is made up of three separate modules: one for the processor, one for how the unit communicates on a network and a third for power. This means you can upgrade any of these components – say, to swap out for a faster processor – with little effort. Just unscrew the back panel, slide out the required part, put the hatch back on and you’re done.

I unplug it from my office and take it home with little or no effort.[/QUOTE]

So basically it’s a computer. As in normal desktop computer where you can replace parts with a little effort. Need more powerful cpu? Just buy a new (compatible) one, unscrew the side panel, take old cpu and cooler out and put the new ones in.

If this was cheap (compared to a desktop), it might work. But 850 bucks and you get what? A smaller case.

And where does that “normal PC has a 5 year lifespan” come from? I’d say people upgrade their computers around that time for more powerful one - not that it doesn’t work anymore or it cannot be fixed easily. I think I have two or three 10 years old machines laying around and they work just fine.

Normal desktop PC:s are built for easy repair. It has under than 10 parts which (most of the time) all are user replaceable. PSU, CPU, Motherboard, Memory, GPU, HDD, Optical drives and possible addon-cards.


#10

In my experience, changing hardware is the easy part of any upgrade.
The hard, at least the most laborious, part is reloading programs and user documents.

What’s the storage in these things?
Or is it just a glorified Chrome OS type device using cloud storage?