New coffee makers must switch off after brewing in Europe

vbimport

#1

If you recently bought a new coffee maker and wonder why it’s not keeping its coffee hot, you’re not alone!

On the 1st of January, the European Union has introduced new rules to target energy consumption of new coffee machines, as well as other household devices such as Internet routers and gas ovens.

According to the new legislation, when the brewing cycle of a drip-filter coffee machines ends, it must switch off after 40 minutes. They say that any longer is simply a waste of energy as they claim the coffee is undrinkable after 40 minutes.

The rules vary for different types of coffee machines. Drip-filter coffee machines with an insulated jug must switch off within 5 minutes of the brewing cycle ending, but in this case, it makes sense since these don’t have a hotplate.

Espresso machines must switch off 30 minutes after use, so those who like to keep their coffee cups warm sitting on the machine will be in for a nasty surprise.

Further details on Which? and BBC News.


#2

Just another example of government control run a muck.


#3

I have a drip coffee maker I seldom use but it is several years old .
It still would work if I used it & would keep the coffee carefe hot .
I still use an electric percolator which is even older . So old I don’t remember the year I bought it. I only keeps the coffee a good warm not hot. This is the way it has always worked.
I don’t leave either on after the coffee has brewed . I agree this ruins the taste.
I use an Stanley stainless steel thermos .I pour myself a cup & the thermos holds a quart.
The coffee stays hot for over an hour. This way the air doesn’t oxidize the coffee making it bitter . My microwave will get the coffee back to hot & doesn’t seem to change the flavor . Note I only use microwave capable ceramic mugs.

I agree with UTR way too much Big Brother watching .

I have a gas cook stove with oven .
It was made after the California law was passed .
Even though I bought it in Texas where I live.
It turns the oven pilot way down except when the oven thermostat is turned on.
This mays it easy to blow out. I have to check irt every time I use the oven.
It stays on about 60 percent of the time. This is a PITA IMO .
I can’t see how shutting a gas oven off after a certain amount of time would work.
What about a long cooking time item like a turkey ?
My last turkey spent 5 hours in the oven . With another hour for other various items.


#4

But they had a point when it came to the power consumption of vacuum cleaners.

Many domestic vacuum cleaners had motors over 2KW, but even much larger commercial machines often had motors of only 1.2KW.

The motor power was largely a marketing device. The vast majority of domestic models are aerodynamically inefficient and increasing the motor power did not solve their performance limitations.

If you want a vacuum cleaner which sucks, get a Hoover (or Dyson, Miele, Bosch, Electrolux…). If you want one which cleans, get a Numatic. :iagree:


#5

I don’t think the US has a vacuum cleaner law . Yet.
All but two of my vacumm cleaners are old enough it wouldn’t matter.
Hoover upright & Eureka canister. Bissell electric “broom” .
Three Shop vacs : small, normal & large .
One Bissell carpet cleaner from when I had carpet .
I don’t know the watts on any of them & I’m not fixing to check .


#6

For vacuums I am sold on Dyson. We have had the same Dyson for almost ten years and it runs as good as when it was new. The engineer in me appreciates the way Dyson designs their vacuums. No need to buy bags, filters etc. and the suction stays consistent at all times. They replaced the clear canister free of charge AFTER the warranty expired even though I broke it doing something stupid. I wish our coffee makers were as durable.


#7

[Apologies to Séan for going off topic. :flower:]

We used to have the original Dyson cylinder vac and weren’t impressed.

Various bits of plastic broke easily and a lot of dust went straight through the cyclone. When someone sucked up a modest amount of plaster dust the whole thing died. The dust had gone straight through the cyclone, clogged up the filter (yes, they do have a filter to clog up) and moments later the motor overheated (it ran pretty hot even at the best of times). Fortunately the thermal cutout had done its job and reset when everything had cooled. Needed a new filter though.

Fast forward a decade and a similar thing happened to our new Numatic Micro-Filter (somebody hadn’t learned their lesson). It carried on working, but people complained of some loss of suction. Eventually it was brought to me to look at and I feared the worst - this model has additional permanent tertiary filters which are expensive to replace (I think it is intended for use in hospitals & operating theaters!). But the inside was spotless. The disposable bag had contained all the plaster dust.

Another reason I like the Numatics are the bags. They didn’t hike the price when they changed from paper to cloth bags. Their ‘Hepa-Flo’ bags cost a fraction of what other manufactures charge - I have paid as little as £0.45 in packs of 10.

Before we got the Numatic we had a Miele (just about every plastic part which could break did so within 2 years - so much for paying for quality). Last time I looked they had hiked the price to £3 per bag!

[Tip - Numatic ‘Henry’ bags can fit a Miele with minimal modification, and work a treat. ;)]


#8

Yea sorry Séan we did go to Vacs .
I use a Shop Vac for “plaster” dust .
Actually that’s drywall dust in my case .
I’ve burned up a few (after a lot of use).
The Shop Vac first filter is just a flat paper filter.
I guess it’s paper . I just use an old paint brush to dust it off.
With it still on the vac.
When it gets worse . I remove it & shake it out.
Every so often I wash it . With dish washing liquid .
Let it dry & use it again . I use two of those .
An old worn one protects the newer one . Every once in a while the old top one gets damaged enough to replace.
There is a inner foam filter . I wash it the same way . Ocassionally.
I also just blow both out with compressed air from my air compressor.
Outside .
I have never used a Dyson , Numatic , or Miele . So I can’t comment on them either way .
My Hoover upright is about 30 years old & the Eureka canister is close to the same.
I do have to use filters & they do cost more than I thing they should.


#9

One thing this coffee machine ruling could do is tempt customers into either choosing stove-top peculators or placing the brewed coffee pot on a hob on low.

I’m not sure how this is suppose to work for routers. Surely you shouldn’t have to go up to your router and take it out of standby every time you want to go online. Of course someone could simply set up a device to repetitively ping an IP address to keep the router online, but in that case it would actually result in increased energy usage, i.e. the router staying online as well as an Internet connected device running 24 hours a day endlessly pinging something to keep the router from going into standby.

As for the Dyson vs Numatic, we’ve gone though a similar process already. While the Dyson had good suction, we had the same issue of bits chipping off and using duct tape here and there to hold it together after just 3 years of use. We also had annoying dust plumes each time we empty it and it was getting more awkward to empty due to its release button also breaking. Over a year ago, we got a Henry (Numatic) and so far nothing has chipped, no hose kinks and having a bag with at least 10x the capacity. The only issue we had with Numatic is it that it gave off a foul odour as the bag filled (we have a dog) and that the optional carbon filter was quite expensive (£41), although it did eliminate the odour problem.


#10

[QUOTE=Seán;2745248]The only issue we had with Numatic is it that it gave off a foul odour as the bag filled (we have a dog) and that the optional carbon filter was quite expensive (£41), although it did eliminate the odour problem.[/QUOTE]
Same problem here, except it was caused by sucking up dead woodlice (in a house which is shut up for 10 months a year). The carbon filter is good, but you won’t find one for less than £30.

At home we bought a second Numatic vac for dirty jobs. This one doesn’t have a name, but it is a commercial variant of the Bertie model (small, nice & quiet, but the cable has to be coiled up manually).

It should be possible to reduce the power consumption of routers. But getting them to wake up & sleep correctly will be tricky, especially using the wireless network. And Ethernet devices do like to chat to each other when idle. I suspect that new standards will be required.


#11

[QUOTE=cholla;2745224]I have a gas cook stove with oven .
It was made after the California law was passed .
Even though I bought it in Texas where I live.
It turns the oven pilot way down except when the oven thermostat is turned on.
This mays it easy to blow out. I have to check irt every time I use the oven.
It stays on about 60 percent of the time. This is a PITA IMO .[/QUOTE]
Pilot light? I’m pretty sure they all use electronic ignition now. My stove/oven is gas. The burners have electronic ignition. I presume the oven is the same though I can’t say for sure. I’ve certainly never had to mess with a pilot light though.


#12

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2745267]Pilot light? I’m pretty sure they all use electronic ignition now. My stove/oven is gas. The burners have electronic ignition. I presume the oven is the same though I can’t say for sure. I’ve certainly never had to mess with a pilot light though.[/QUOTE]

Hi Stereodude .
This stove/oven is 100% non-electric .That should explain it.
That means it doesn’t even have a clock or light in the oven.

What the oven thermostat is off the pilot in the oven which is a gas pilot with a thermocouple for safety turns itself down to a very low flame.
When the oven thermostat is turned on the pilot turns itself up or the oven burner would "blow "it out when it cycles.

These were made after California passed a law requiring this.

This stove is circa 1987 but still looks & works great except for this one thing.