Nervous about de-lidding your CPU?

vbimport

#1

Are you nervous about de-lidding your expensive CPU?

The crappy thermal interface material (TIM) that Intel have used on their recent CPU’s, severely hampers your overclock.

Removing the heat spreader that covers the CPU die with a razor blade is risky and dangerous.

Some put their CPU into a vice, then knock off the heat spreader with a piece of wood and a hammer.

How about de-lidding with an inexpensive tool that is made for the job?

Take a look and see.


#2

Very nice find Dee :iagree:


#3

If the temps are that high and you can gain, from what I read online, close to 30C then YES its worth the risk and any tool that makes life easier would be welcomed.


#4

[QUOTE=Dee;2785825]Are you nervous about de-lidding your expensive CPU?

The crappy thermal interface material (TIM) that Intel have used on their recent CPU’s, severely hampers your overclock.

Removing the heat spreader that covers the CPU die with a razor blade is risky and dangerous.

Some put their CPU into a vice, then knock off the heat spreader with a piece of wood and a hammer.

How about de-lidding with an inexpensive tool that is made for the job?

Take a look and see.

Hi Dee, It would seem to me. That Intel should do this, being that the amount that one pays for a Intel CPU. Just my opinion.


#5

[QUOTE=Mr.Bill;2785847]Hi Dee, It would seem to me. That Intel should do this, being that the amount that one pays for a Intel CPU. Just my opinion.[/QUOTE]I totally agree.
Going back to Sandy Bridge. Intel soldered the die to the heat spreader. Solder has much better thermal conductivity than any TIM.
Intel said for technical reasons they couldn’t solder Ivy Bridge and later CPU’s.
Saying that Intel wasn’t lying about not being able to solder the later CPU’s, and given the price of the K variant of Core CPU’s. They could have at least used a good quality TIM.

BTW: Anyone attempting this should NOT use any TIM with diamond content, at it will scratch the CPU die.