Nerovision Express 3 problem

vbimport

#1

I´ve got a problem that keeps comming back when I try to burn a DVD that I-ve created.

It all works fine until the very end of the transcoding process and you would think that it is finished and is about to start with the next step but then it displays an error message and stops.

Here is the error from the log:

[11:22:17] DVDEngine ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ******END: VTSTT_VOBS - INFORMATION after Update
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ****END: VTSTT_VOBS - Process Update
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ****BEGIN: VTSTT_VOBS - Verify
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ****END: VTSTT_VOBS - Verify
[11:22:17] DVDEngine …VTSTT_VOBS: size=3.15 GB (3,381,002,240 bytes)
[11:22:17] DVDEngine **END: _DVDPVR - Create/Update VTSTT_VOBS
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ########################################################################################
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ERROR
[11:22:17] DVDEngine cause: 2 (internal_error)
[11:22:17] DVDEngine source: _data_zone_layout
[11:22:17] DVDEngine description: Failed to calculate file content layout.
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ########################################################################################
[11:22:17] DVDEngine END: IDVDPVRSessionImpl - WriteVOBs
[11:22:17] DVDEngine BEGIN: IDVDSessionBaseImpl - EndDiscAccess
[11:22:17] DVDEngine …Flags=0
[11:22:17] DVDEngine **BEGIN: _MediaAccess::Release ()
[11:22:17] DVDEngine ****BEGIN: _MediaAccess::~_MediaAccess ()
[11:22:22] DVDEngine ****END: _MediaAccess::~_MediaAccess ()
[11:22:22] DVDEngine **END: _MediaAccess::Release ()
[11:22:22] DVDEngine END: IDVDSessionBaseImpl - EndDiscAccess
[11:22:22] DVDEngine BEGIN: IDVDSessionBaseImpl - RegisterCallback
[11:22:22] DVDEngine …Session callback unregistered…
[11:22:22] DVDEngine END: IDVDSessionBaseImpl - RegisterCallback
[11:22:22] DVDUI Device [SONY DVD RW DW-Q28A ] unlock SUCCEED
[11:22:29] GCHW Node added: Microsoft Kernel Wave Audio Mixer


#2

I am not sure but problem may be because VOB size is over 3 Gigs. The DVD standard only allows a maximum of 1 Gig (you can have multiple VOBS). There is probably an option to set the maximum VOB size to 1 Gig.

Below is an extract from a DVD guide for information

DVD Structure & Layout for Video DVD’s

This is far from being an in depth discussion of DVD file structures,
but will give a basic understanding of how a DVD is organized.

A movie DVD is really not much different than a data DVD, in the sense that both contain data files. A movie DVD however, follows a very specific file format and file naming conventions.

To see how a DVD is structured, just place it in your DVD computer drive and explore the disc. You’ll notice one or possibly two main directories:

11.07.2003 11:20 <DIR> AUDIO_TS (TS stands for Title Sets) - this directory may be absent on newer DVD’s.
11.07.2003 13:55 <DIR> VIDEO_TS (This directory must always be present for video DVD movies)

AUDIO_TS contains only audio files or may be an empty folder. In the case of newer DVD’s this folder may be completely absent ! *
VIDEO_TS contains ALL the data (video as well as audio, for the playback of movies)

  • The initial DVD standard called for a folder called the AUDIO_TS in cases where the DVD was to be used only as an audio storage medium. Later standards abandoned it’s use. Some older DVD Players however, are expecting to see a separate AUDIO_TS folder. Even although the folder may be empty and not even used, the player will throw a fit if it can’t find the folder. Note that most new DVD’s in fact, won’t even contain an AUDIO_TS title set. Some authoring software packages include it for backwards compatibility with older players, though most newer commercial DVD’s have dropped it altogether. If you have one of these ancient players, it’s probably time to upgrade anyway…

Since the AUDIO_TS directory is being phased out anyways, we won’t delve into it.

There are 3 basic File Types: (actually, only two - as BUP files are identical copies of the INF files)

VOB Files (Video Objects)
INF Files (Information Files)
BUP Files (Backup Files)

VOB Files:

The VOB files contain the body of the movie if you will. The data contains both video, audio as well as subtitle information data streams - all interleaved together. All video by standard, is compressed MPEG-2, while the standard audio format is normally AC3 (also known as Dolby Digital). AC3 streams may have a bit-rates between 192 and 448kbit/sec. 192kbit/sec is used for standard 2 channel stereo, while 384-448kbit/sec is used for 5.1channel surround sound.

A VOB contains one primary video stream but may also contain several multi-angle streams for example, thus allowing the selection of different perspectives. The only limitation, is that the maximum bit-rate of the video streams is 9.8mbits/sec while combined video & audio must always be below 10 mbits/sec. Up to 9 different audio streams and up to 32 different subtitle streams are also supported.

Also, any single VOB file must never be greater than 1 GB in size for compatibility with set top players (The 1 GB max file size is not a hardware limitation, but rather is the maximum agreed on VOB file size set forth by the DVD standards committee). Thus many movies may contain & span several VOB’s - as a single 1gb VOB file will hold only approximately 27 minutes of material if recorded in the SP mode. VOB files larger than 1gb may play ok on your computer, but playback on most standalone players is doubtful.

VOB Files are further broken down by their purpose and how structured by the authoring software.

For example: The VIDEO_TS.VOB files contain the initial DVD opening “splash” screen and menu options. The large VOB files are normally those containing the body of the program.

A DVD may have multiple chapters: Each chapter is designated by a file name of VTS_X. Thus Chapter 1 would be in VTS_01_0.VOB, Chapter 2 in VTS_02_0.VOB etc etc… The VTS_01_0.VOB and the VTS_01_1.VOB files for example, contain the audio/video that will play for the first chapter.

IFO Files (Information Files)

IFO Files serve as a directory that the player uses to determine where a chapter starts or where a certain audio or subtitle stream is located . It is for this reason that a separate IFO & BUP file is created for each chapter (the naming conventions should be by now, quite obvious)

The IFO files all contain a data structure known as VMGM_MAT that must be present in the VIDEO_TS.IFO files. The IFO files contain much more than just where things are located though… It tells the player how many chapters are present, # of angles available, where to find the streams, cell addressing & Cell ID, bit padding used etc etc. In a sense it’s a complete dossier on the DVD - how it’s laid out, how to read it and where streams can be found. Loss or corruption of an INF file, results in the entire DVD being rendered unplayable…

BUP Files (Backup Files)

The BUP Files are nothing more than backups of the critical INF Files in case of damage. Should an INF file be corrupt, the disc would be rendered unplayable, as without any way of knowing where the streams are located or even how to play the DVD, the player software would be lost. Thus in the case of a CRC read error of an INF file, the player software will automatically default to using the backup file. If you managed to cleverly clobber both the INF AND the BUP’s, then the DVD is “history” - even although the main VOB files containing the program material are fine.

Since VOB files are nothing more than glorified MPEG-2’s, renaming them to .mpg may allow playback of a damaged disc on your computer, as most MPEG-2 players will happily play them. If that’s successful, then the VOB’s can be re-ripped and new INF and BUP’s generated by re-authoring. Somewhat of a hack, but all may not be lost !

Note that each title has a minimum of at least 2 VOB’s (one for the menu and one for the main feature) and exactly one IFO and one BUP file.


#3

I don’t use NVE at all but on the burn settings screen select the “write to hard disk folder” option, rather than burn straight away. When the process completes you’ll see what files/sizes are created. These can always be burned later.

If you can do this & report back what has been created it’ll be easier to help you. We need to be certain that NVE does actually complete correctly first.