Need to transfer my current C: drive to new system

vbimport

#1

hello guys I am not a total newbie, but a newbie to this site
and I need your expertise.

I have a high-end, homemade rig

Mobo: EVGA Classified 4 way SLI, just upgraded the BIOS
RAM: Dominator DDR3 24GB
CPU: Intel Core i7 980, 3.2 ghz Extreme Edition
Graphics: Radeon 5970 X2 in Crossfire Setup
Using on board Ethernet
Adaptec 6805 RAID Controller Card
Intel X25M 120GB X5 SSD Drives, not optimized, in RAID 0

My system has been solid for about 2 years, no real poblems, but recently found my C:\ drive only has 21.3 GB left the C:\ Drive is about 581 GB formatted.

I need help in finding the best way to image my C: Drive so that I can migrate it to a larger sSD setup maybe 2 or 3 512 GB SSD drives. I am not a know it all although I have been building systems since 1991. Any
help is greatly appreciated and thanks beforehand.

Also, if you can comment on the EVGA board, would you keep it or change it out. I see it has been deactivated on NewEgg site.

medmansc2CS


#2

I liked to use Acronis Disk Director Suite 10 to copy partitions, but stopping using it after reading this. Whether the Adaptec RAID card can make the maximum use out of the latest 512GB SSD’s seems like the only real issue since copying partitions is relatively easy.


#3

Medman, your title made me think you wanted to use a new motherboard with the old C: Drive.

But your description sounds like you’re keeping your motherboard, video card, etc, but only wanted to increase the capacity of C: Drive.

“Migrating” onto a new RAID’d C: Drive now will be difficult - you risk data corruption, loss and would probably end up re-installing Windows and everything.

I’ve been debating “Increasing Boot Drive SSDs” and have lately turned against this notion, opting instead of a Clone-Backup of a smaller 60-90Gb SSD as my Boot-&-Program-Files-Only drive because this might, theoretically, lessen the SSD’s chances for a fatal attack of electricity. (A bit of a joke - we’ve got a discussion thread about SSD Deaths and usually those are at power-ups, sort of like light-bulbs. Hit the switch and POP!)

By creating (and maintaining) a small C: Drive SSD, then occasionally cloning it to a ‘cold unit’ (unpowered, disconnected) stacked under it in my computer), I’ve got a fairly low-cost backup disk. Any Boot Disc death is a matter of taking off a computer panel, connecting in the Dead C: Drive’s cables to the Clone Unit, and whoosh, I should be running again.

But my D: Drive is where everything else is.

If you’re looking at increasing capacity only, though, you might consider the WD Velociraptor series - these 10,000 rpm demons.

They won’t snap my computer’s Desktop on as fast as an SSD, but almost.

One caveat with these drives: they WILL BE NOISY. Count on it. They won’t make babies cry, they won’t make you think you’ve moved into a sawmill or a dentist’s office, but they definitely alert me when I’m doing large SEEKs. “Yes - I’m here - I’m working away!” Uh. Yeah. Thanks.

(I was seeing the NewEgg ad in my above link… good grief - the 150Gb for $50?!! Oh… “out of stock.” Yeah. No kidding. These are some of the oldest versions, too. Still… these might require a 30-second Desktop start-up instead of an SSD’s 15-second version. I could spare 15 seconds.)

The worst note of your ‘confessional’ made me want to bring out the ruler onto your knuckles. “Filling up the Boot Drive by more than 60% always is a problem for the rest of your computer.” Even on SSDs - your Boot Drive should have plenty of open swap space for best performance. If you’ve got 500Gb of ‘stuff’ on your boot drive, I’d say, “You need to have a 1Tb C: Drive.”

Or, start thinking about moving TONS of that stuff to another drive - a data drive. Surely you don’t have 500Gb of Program Files & Windows! Or is that better exclaimed as a question?!! Yikes!!


#4

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2646865]

If you’re looking at increasing capacity only, though, you might consider the WD Velociraptor series - these 10,000 rpm demons.

[/QUOTE]

That 1TB Velociraptor will be great for this kind of use:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227753


#5

Kenshin, ChristineBCW

Thanks for your prompt reply. medman bc I am in the drug abuse detox business. I am interested in trying a new Mobo, maybe Asus Rampage III. Any good boards for socket LGA1366 that you know of? Any suggestions would be great. I went over your answer and do you think it is inevitable; is a fresh install of Win 7 needed. Sounds like that from your reply. Seems like I need major surgery on my rig and its unavoidable. Please comment.

medmansc


#6

NO. It’s not inevitable! Let me concoct another long-winded reply and force you to suffer thru that! ha ha


#7

It should depend on how much you want out of the new installation. Many of the newer-generation motherboards have things like SATA 600MB/s and PCI-Express 3.0 onboard, but then your Adaptec card can already beat the onboard SATA controllers especially concerning RAIDed SSD use. If you want to reuse existing CPU and other components other than the motherboard, it may be difficult to find a cost-effective replacement as yours is already high-end enough. Migrating one RAID configuration to another doesn’t sound alright to me, but you are probably less afraid since you have used RAID for so long. Isn’t replacing your board with Rampage III a downgrade? You must have spent quite a lot on those five Intel 120GB SSD’s as even a single 80GB then was too expensive. I used 32GB and 40GB SSD’s as C: in 2010, not striped.


#8

First, you should explore how much Data (pix, music files, letters to mom, etc.) you’ve got stored on your current C: Drive. Those CAN be eligible for removal to a new 2nd hard-drive (or 3rd or whatever).

If you’re using Windows (XP? Vista? W7?), I can right-click on the MY DOCUMENTS icon on my desktop and ‘move’ all of those files to a new, more-empty HDD, thus emptying C: Drive a bit more.

(The MY DOCUMENTS settings are not too thorough, though - plenty of ‘settings’ files are still sadly stored on any C: Drive. This Migration-Move ends up putting some of your changeable Data Files on one drive, and some - like Favorites-Bookmarks, Desktop icons-files - remain on C: Drive. Grrr…)

I am killing time for the moment, awaiting a morning-fishing expedition to assemble.

I was looking at LogicBuy’s Hard Drives (“Lowest Price first” sequence) page and saw some incredible deals - INCLUDING some pretty great deals on SSDs.

There’s a 120Gb OCZ Agility3 for $69.99. A Seagate Barricuda 1Tb HDD for $79.99 (which will have ‘cloning software utils’ available on the Seagate website that merrily will clone some other mfr’s HDD onto their Seagate products).

Then, in the $165 range, there are some 256Gb SSDs being offered.

I still think “A couple of small SSDs PLUS a lot of good User Discipline” is the better behavior, but I know if I had a BIG SSD, I’d probably fill it up, too! Darn…

And finally, maybe I should comment: “Reloading Windows IS inevitable” in my opinion for ALL computers. It’s actually a good thing, though. When I do wipeout’s-and-reloads, my computer LOVES it.

For a while. Then I gunk it up again.

This Wipeout-And-Reload mentality forces me into several disciplined behaviors, though: (1) Backup all data; (2) maintain copies of all programs I use and want to re-install; (3) be prepared to call Microsoft when they refuse to activate my Win License and this is usually a 6-minute touch-tone phone “conversation” between me and some robot.

Oh. And finally… accepting that I’ll screw this up and lose something. Something! After doing it a couple of times in a year, though, whatever I’ve lost is either long gone and nearly forgotten, or else I’ve found it and will be more careful. Next time. There’s always a next time.

So, YES I consider reloading Windows to be inevitable for all computers.

But NO, not necessarily in THIS case. If you’ve got backups and have access to all wanted programs, then you have a great luxury of choosing your computer’s future. (Personally, I don’t think you’re going to get much ‘bang-fer-yer-buck’ improvements over any new hardware. It will be prettier, shinier, but I doubt if you’ll see 5% performance improvement for a LOT of new dollars spent.)


#9

Paragon backup disk pro is a very reliant soft for your purpose


#10

Windows has dozens of ways to do it.


#11

The best scheme is to transfer your DATA (Pictures, Music, Video & Documents)
to another drive.

KEEP your data seperated from your operating system and programs.

Data is moveable without issues, the operating system and installed programs are somewhat more difficult.

I personally don’t even keep my mail program on my system drive.
(I actually download and SAVE my mail)

Run JUST your OS and programs on the SSD.


#12

[QUOTE=medmansc2CS;2646852]
I have a high-end, homemade rig

Mobo: EVGA Classified 4 way SLI, just upgraded the BIOS
RAM: Dominator DDR3 24GB
CPU: Intel Core i7 980, 3.2 ghz Extreme Edition
Graphics: Radeon 5970 X2 in Crossfire Setup
Using on board Ethernet
Adaptec 6805 RAID Controller Card
Intel X25M 120GB X5 SSD Drives, not optimized, in RAID 0

My system has been solid for about 2 years, no real problems, but recently found my C:\ drive only has 21.3 GB left the C:\ Drive is about 581 GB formatted.

I need help in finding the best way to image my C: Drive so that I can migrate it to a larger sSD setup maybe 2 or 3 512 GB SSD drives. I am not a know it all although I have been building systems since 1991. Any
help is greatly appreciated and thanks beforehand.

Also, if you can comment on the EVGA board, would you keep it or change it out. I see it has been deactivated on NewEgg site.
[/QUOTE]

If you have been building Rigs since '91, then you should know a Fresh Load of Windows 7 or you can think about Windows 8, is always best. I have never Cloned, to me that is just asking for trouble. At first I thought you just wanted to increase storage, then all you would need is a second HDD and off load your Data from the C:. With a new MB and Hardware loading the OS Fresh is the answer. Your System has run solid for 2 years, and that should be your answer.

Get a new SSD to load your OS and keep your existing 120SSD as a Back-up second HDD, but then also think about getting a 1Tb or more HDD for storage. :cool:


#13

Another possibility is to “clone” your installation from the striped RAID-0 volume to a single large drive a 1tb drive would do easily.

Then buy your new SSD’s set up the raid the way you want then clone back to the larger RAID volume.

Cloning works fairly well once you are past the initial steep (nerve wracking)
learning curve