Need FAST DVD reader

vbimport

#1

I review medical image studies (CT scans) transported to me on CD and am tired of waiting any longer than I have to for the studies to load (writing to disk is not of concern, just reading). Which models are the most fastest and most reliable at reading?

Thanks,
Ken K


#2

Depends on the QUALITY of these “CDs”.


#3

If you mean the CD brands, it covers the gamut. If you are asking what the condition is, then the condition is good to excellent with only an occasional disk that has a few light scratches.


#4

“condition” is important as nada in this case.

You cannot use a crappor to create gold from it.


#5

[QUOTE=kdkrone;2662303]I review medical image studies (CT scans) transported to me on CD and am tired of waiting any longer than I have to for the studies to load (writing to disk is not of concern, just reading). Which models are the most fastest and most reliable at reading?

Thanks,
Ken K[/QUOTE]

Hi Ken,

What are the limitations for a drive that you can use? Are you viewing them on a laptop and need an external drive? Or are you able to use a 1/2 height internal drive? What are you using currently?


#6

I have just built a system with a 256 GB ssd, Intel i5-3550 cpu, 16 GB ram, 2+ TB additional storage. My CD/DVD reader is an LG 22NS40 “SuperMulti DVD WRiter” built 1/10. I view the studies on two 24" monitors. This is not a laptop.

Thanks
Ken K


#7

OK, thanks. You appear to have more than enough machine to make the drive a good place to look for a speed increase ;). I suggest that we find out if the drive is slowing you down or not before buying a new one. Download discspeed and run a read speed(transfer rate) test with a few of your CD’s to learn how well your current drive is actually doing? Click on “Run test” up on the menu bar and choose “transfer rate” with a CD in the drive. That drive should be capable of max 48x read speed(on a full disc) if it is still in decent shape. You can click on the floppy disc icon after the test to save a png of the graph and post it up here if you’d like.

I’d hate to steer you to a new drive if you’re just dealing with the fact that CD reading is old tech and does pale in comparison to the speed you would expect with a machine like that.


#8

Hi. Thanks deanwitty for taking an interest in this. I am posting three graphs from three different CDs of CT scans: (I am not clear on what the red vertical line is about…?) (Hopefully, this helps. I am not sure how to post a .png file so I used photobucket. Let me know if you prefer the .png files and tell me how to post them)

Looks like the max is under 30X. Is that likely to be how the CDs are made or is it a function of the drive itself?

Thanks
Ken K


#9

I’m sorry, I should have explained posting images. You simply click the small paper clip icon(attachments) in the top row of the tool bar and a selection box pops up to choose the files on your computer to upload. Those JPGs are clear enough.

The bottom scale represents 0-80 for a standard 80 minute CD-R. The vertical scale at left represents the read speed from 0-48x. The red line indicates the end of the data area that is burned on that particular CD-R.

Glad we took a minute to test your drive. Bad news is, that is a good reader. There is no indication that it is struggling to read those CD-Rs. If it was, you would see something like this on your read speed graph. The read speed would drop down along the way rather than smoothly rising to the end.

The reason that the read speed starts slower and rises is due to the read strategy employed by drives, constant angular velocity. Essentially, the CD spins at a constant RPM, but as each spiral gets longer starting from the center, each rotation of the disc transfers a little more data than the last, and the data transfer rate keeps climbing until the end of the data on that disc is reached. You will not see the transfer rate of 48x that your drive is capable of unless you run into a CD-R that is burned almost to it’s full capacity.

With the average transfer rate of a good reader like yours only being in the 4-5 MB/sec range, I’m afraid that the media is to blame for your wait.

Unless you can convince them to start burning DVD-R(around 12 MB/sec) or use fast flash drives, I think you may be stuck with that 30 sec. to 1 minute wait.


#10

Thanks for the good news/bad news.

Unfortunately, I have no control over the quality of the CDs on which the CT scans are burned, as they are sent from all over the country.
What it tells me is that I need to find a program that will allow me to direct it to a folder to find the DICOM files that need to be displayed. (I will just hire someone to rip the files to a hard drive, after which I will read them.)

Thanks again,
Ken K


#11

[QUOTE=kdkrone;2662753]Thanks for the good news/bad news.

Unfortunately, I have no control over the quality of the CDs on which the CT scans are burned, as they are sent from all over the country.
What it tells me is that I need to find a program that will allow me to direct it to a folder to find the DICOM files that need to be displayed. (I will just hire someone to rip the files to a hard drive, after which I will read them.)

Thanks again,
Ken K[/QUOTE]
Actually, the quality of the CDs didn’t come into play. Perhaps I wasn’t clear about the fact that your read speeds are as fast as they get. No evidence of poor quality CDs.

Your hard drive solution sounds like a good option.