Need ASUS DRW-24B1ST 1.04 firmware .bin file

vbimport

#1

Has anyone saved off a firmware rev. 1.04 .bin file from an ASUS DRW-24B1ST B-series drive? I thought I had done so before flashing my 24B1ST with Lite-On firmware using the codeguys Flash Utility 6.01, which saved it as ASUS_DRW-24B1ST_a_1.04.bin. However, I just discovered that for some reason it wasn’t successful as it was only an 8K file. I believe it should be around 2MB.

I have searched the ASUS sites here and abroad and searched the net high and low, but the only firmware I can find for the DRW-24B1ST is 1.03 for the A-series drives.

Help??


#2

This should do it for you. ASUS DRW-24B1ST 1.04 Bin

Bill


#3

Many thanks!

I’m not having any luck with this DRW-24B1ST drive, even when flashed with Lite-On iHAS324 firmware. It writes discs a full 30 quality test points lower than either of my two AD-7200S drives.

This DRW-24B1ST is my second one. The first one wrote much better discs, but also had more noise and vibration than any drive I’ve ever had, so I sent it back for exchange. This one is smooth and quiet, but couldn’t write a good disc to save it’s life.
[B]
[/B]


#4

Wonderwrench,

As you can probably tell at this point, I’m new to this cross-flashing stuff. Apparently, I will also need a backup of the EEPROM for the ASUS DRW-24B1ST B-series drive. I don’t suppose you have one of those handy, do you? (If they had a Smilie for sheepish, I would insert it here!)


#5

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614203]As you can probably tell at this point, I’m new to this cross-flashing stuff.[/QUOTE]

Which is a very good reason for doing proper research/reading first before going ahead with it! :wink:

The first rule of crossflashing is to [B]ALWAYS[/B] backup [U]both[/U] your [U]firmware[/U] (using the Flash Utility) and your [U]EEPROM[/U] (using the EEPROM Utility) before attempting a crossflash, and to keep those two backups safe!!!

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614203]Apparently, I will also need a backup of the EEPROM for the ASUS DRW-24B1ST B-series drive. I don’t suppose you have one of those handy, do you? (If they had a Smilie for sheepish, I would insert it here!)[/QUOTE]

The EEPROM of each drive is unique as it contains calibration data unique to that drive. As such, never ever flash the EEPROM of one drive to another!!!

[B]Why do you think you need to reflash your EEPROM?[/B]

By the way, in your first post you said:

That 8k file is probably an EEPROM backup you made using the EEPROM Utility, since the size of an EEPROM backup is 8k…


#6

If I’m going to flash this piece of crap drive back to the original ASUS firmware, I figured I’d need to reflash the EEPROM because, as you pointed out, “it contains calibration data unique to that drive”. I want to see if it could possibly be any worse with the original firmware.

As far as backing up the original firmware and EEPROM, I did do that using the Flash Utility and the EEPROM Utility. But what I didn’t realize at the time was that the result was an 8 KB .bin file with the filename ASUS_DRW-24B1ST_a_1.04.bin, which I later assumed was a failed firmware backup, and a 0 byte “NULL” file. My fault for not checking the result of the backup programs.

Are you saying that the EEPROM backup is also a .bin file? If so, then maybe the EEPROM backup was successful.


#7

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614219]If I’m going to flash this piece of crap drive back to the original ASUS firmware, I figured I’d need to reflash the EEPROM because, as you pointed out, “it contains calibration data unique to that drive”. I want to see if it could possibly be any worse with the original firmware.[/QUOTE]

The firmware and the EEPROM are two separate things. Just because you flashed your drive with a LiteON firmware, that doesn’t mean that your original EEPROM was somehow erased/overwritten, unless you specifically flashed another EEPROM file to your drive (which you should not have done). If you just flashed the LiteON firmware and then used the Convert Drive feature in the EEPROM Utility then you’re fine. You don’t have to flash the original EEPROM back. Just use the Convert Drive feature again after you have flashed the ASUS firmware back and that’s it.

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614219]As far as backing up the original firmware and EEPROM, I did do that using the Flash Utility and the EEPROM Utility. But what I didn’t realize at the time was that the result was an 8 KB .bin file with the filename ASUS_DRW-24B1ST_a_1.04.bin, which I later assumed was a failed firmware backup, and a 0 byte “NULL” file. My fault for not checking the result of the backup programs.

Are you saying that the EEPROM backup is also a .bin file? If so, then maybe the EEPROM backup was successful.[/QUOTE]

Yes, the EEPROM backup is indeed a .bin file with a size of 8kB (8192 bytes).
If you want to be 100% sure, upload that file to mediafire.com and post it here or PM me the link and I’ll have a look at it with a hex editor and confirm if it is indeed an EEPROM file as I suspect it is.


#8

I just checked the actual size of the ASUS_DRW-24B1ST_a_1.04.bin file that was saved and it is exactly 8192 bytes, as you said. So apparently the original EEPROM backup was successful, but not the firmware backup.

“If you just flashed the LiteON firmware and then used the Convert Drive feature in the EEPROM Utility then you’re fine. You don’t have to flash the original EEPROM back. Just use the Convert Drive feature again after you have flashed the ASUS firmware back and that’s it.”

Now that’s clear and concise info! That’s exactly the procedure I used in crossflashing the 24B1ST to iHAS324 firmware. So no real need for the EEPROM backup at this point, but good to have it anyway. Since wonderwrench was kind enough to provide me with an original DRW-24B1ST 1.04 firmware backup, I should be good to go. Thanks for your patience!


#9

OK, that’s good news.

Just curious: why do you want to go back to the ASUS firmware? LiteON releases firmware updates far more often than ASUS, so you could benefit from this as well as being possible to play with the hypertunning and online hypertunning options (see the options tab in the EEPROM Utility) which could improve burn quality.

Moreover, you could in fact crossflash your drive to an iHAS524 B (that will give you both LabelTag and SmartErase features).

PS. Once you crossflash to a LiteOn model, from that point onwards you can of course use the official LiteOn firmware flashers to update the firmware on your crossflashed drive to the latest LiteOn firmwares … You can also use LiteON’s SmartPack utility to regularly check for firmware updates.


#10

More good info!

To answer your question, I don’t know. Maybe I felt that I didn’t give the original ASUS firmware enough of a chance before crossflashing it to a Lite-On. I’ve used ASUS DVD-ROM and CD-RW drives for years and they have been the smoothest, most reliable and best reading/writing drives I’ve ever had. I’m still using a couple of them in my new Intel i7 quad-core system with IDE-to-SATA converters and they have to be well over five years old. But I’m sure disappointed in this DRW-24B1ST. Apparently, like everyone else, ASUS just farms the design and manufacture of their drives out to the lowest bidder now.

For DVD-RW drives, I’ve always used NEC/Sony/Optiarc or Pioneer. But even the new Optiarcs, after the AD-7200S model, are Lite-On clones and it’s generally accepted that any Pioneer after the DVR-215D models are not as good as they used to be, either. Fortunately, I just managed to buy a brand-new Optiarc AD-7200S for a back-up. After testing, it seems to be just a good as my old one.

So I may do some more back-flashing and cross-flashing of the DRW-24B1ST, but I’m not going to put a lot of time into it, because I don’t see why I should have to spend my time trying to make something out of it. It will probably go on the shelf.


#11

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614230]
For DVD-RW drives, I’ve always used NEC/Sony/Optiarc or Pioneer. But even the new Optiarcs, after the AD-7200S model, are Lite-On clones and it’s generally accepted that any Pioneer after the DVR-215D models are not as good as they used to be, either.[/QUOTE]

The AD-724xS/AD-726xS and the latest AD-728xS drives are definitely not LiteOn clones. They are all based on NEC chipsets, and they are good burners and cheap too (have a look in the NEC section).

As for Pioneers, the last real Pioneer DVD-RW drives were the DVR-117/DVR-217 series. The DVR-218 and the current DVR-219 are all QSI clones, rather than ‘true’ Pioneer drives.


#12

And it’s still a very strong matter of opinion on how good the DVR-x18 & DVR-x19 drives are. :iagree: They seem to be equally as strong as LiteOn drives, if not quite as feature-rich, and still do quite a nice job writing to most media. The x19 series seems to be quite competent from the scans I’ve seen, though it isn’t exactly a “saviour” for cruddy media (but, then again, I can’t say that my DVR-112 and DVR-216 make all of my media sparkle).


#13

[QUOTE=cvs;2614232]The AD-724xS/AD-726xS and the latest AD-728xS drives are definitely not LiteOn clones. They are all based on NEC chipsets, and they are good burners and cheap too (have a look in the NEC section).

As for Pioneers, the last real Pioneer DVD-RW drives were the DVR-117/DVR-217 series. The DVR-218 and the current DVR-219 are all QSI clones, rather than ‘true’ Pioneer drives.[/QUOTE]

I have seen some AD-7240 series drives that looked identical to the older AD-7200 series drives and other AD-7240 drives that looked identical to the newer AD-7260 drives and to Lite-On.

My Optiarc AD-7260 and the ASUS DRW-24B1ST are absolutely physically identical to each other and to current Lite-On drives, including the tray design. Ignore the logo on the bezel and the label on the bottom and I would defy you to tell the difference! Whatever chipset they have in them (and that’s probably more a matter of economics than any desire on their part to make a superior product), they’re obviously made by the same company.


#14

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614262]I have seen some AD-7240 series drives that looked identical to the older AD-7200 series drives and other AD-7240 drives that looked identical to the newer AD-7260 drives and to Lite-On…[/QUOTE]That is perfectly in line since Liteon sourced a series of (IIRC) 24x DVD writers from Optiarc.

Michael


#15

[QUOTE=pcarey;2614262]I have seen some AD-7240 series drives that looked identical to the older AD-7200 series drives and other AD-7240 drives that looked identical to the newer AD-7260 drives and to Lite-On.

My Optiarc AD-7260 and the ASUS DRW-24B1ST are absolutely physically identical to each other and to current Lite-On drives, including the tray design. Ignore the logo on the bezel and the label on the bottom and I would defy you to tell the difference! Whatever chipset they have in them (and that’s probably more a matter of economics than any desire on their part to make a superior product), they’re obviously made by the same company.[/QUOTE]

OK, let’s not get too carried away! :eek:

The AD-7240 series and the AD-7260 series share the same hardware and it is even possible to crossflash between the two, so it is quite normal that they are identical.

The AD-7280 series uses a different (NEC) chipset than the previous two series, so a crossflash is impossible.

Regarding the apparent external similarity between the LiteOn’s and the Sony Optiarcs, if you look at the belly of the drive you’ll notice that in fact there are some noticeable differences.

Just because two drives made by two different manufacturers, look the same on the outside, and share similar or the same tray mechanism that doesn’t mean they will be the same on the inside! One of the drives is based on a Mediatek chipset while the other is built around a NEC chipset, both completely different in functionality and software/hardware architecture, as well as in capability and features and made by two different companies (which in spite of whatever partnership they might have are still competitors). It is not a matter of the two chipsets being somehow equivalent so you can replace one by the other with minor hardware/software modifications.

If you open the drives and compare the inside electronics you’ll see that they are indeed very different. The firmwares they use are structurally different too.

In conclusion, just because the two companies might have some sort of partnership and might share some of the mechanical drive infrastructure (presumably because they want to share some manufacturing and/or research/IP costs), that doesn’t mean the drives are the same… the tray and case used may be made by the same company (whichever that might be) but this ‘shell’ aside, we’re looking at completely different ‘cores’ - which at the end of the day is what it really matters.


#16

[QUOTE=cvs;2614378]
Regarding the apparent external similarity between the LiteOn’s and the Sony Optiarcs, if you look at the belly of the drive you’ll notice that in fact there are some noticeable differences.[/quote]http://liggydee.cdfreaks.com/page/en/Optiarc-AD-7240S/
Liteon iHASx24[B]Y [/B]series is a rebadged AD-724x

Michael


#17

[QUOTE=mciahel;2614493]http://liggydee.cdfreaks.com/page/en/Optiarc-AD-7240S/
Liteon iHASx24[B]Y [/B]series is a rebadged AD-724x

Michael[/QUOTE]

Yes I know … I was referring to the apparent external resemblance between the recent LiteOn drives (real Mediatek ones) and the Optiarc 7240/60 series … as a result of pcarey’s statement that “the new Optiarcs, after the AD-7200S model, are Lite-On clones” …

The fact that that the two companies rebadge each others’ drives now and then, is well known and not under dispute … but that of course doesn’t mean that “the new Optiarcs, after the AD-7200S model, are Lite-On clones” as pcarey has implied…


#18

Yes, you are absolutely right here. And thanks for the clarification. :iagree:

Michael