NEC ND-2500A died after 5 burns

vbimport

#1

UPDATE: Scroll down to my 11-02-2004 post for a happy conclusion. It turns out I had a bad hard drive, rather than a bad NEC burner.

After my first few tests, I was quite happy with this drive. It worked right out of the box with stock 1.06 firmware and I double-verified 5 discs(with Recordnow DX and DVDInfoPro). I also did a full movie play test and it was perfect on my player (with Ritek G04).

Then, on burn #6 it just stopped halfway through (just over 2GB). The light went off on the drive and I could hear what sounded like scratching (or excessive seeking) and it locked up, then spontaneously rebooted the the system (WinXP SP1).

I double-checked everything and uninstalled/re-installed the drive and IDE controller, then tried another burn and the same thing happened.

After that, I realized I should try some simulation burn tests instead of wasting media. Anyway, the same problem occured in simulation in Recordnow DX and Nero.

Needless to say, I’ve just shipped it back (at my own expense) to Newegg for a replacement. :frowning:

Is quality control a dirty word these days? I was just starting to like the drive…


#2

Are you sure your power supply is doing it’s job? No fun to have things break, I’m sure the next one will be great.


#3

Originally posted by rdgrimes
Are you sure your power supply is doing it’s job?

Honestly, I’m not sure about that, other than to say I’ve never had an issue with it before. I’ve never had a problem with a CD-RW, DVD-ROM drive or any hard drives in the system. And I did burn 5 good discs without any problem or signs of impending doom. Could the NEC need significantly more juice than the CD-RW it replaced and cause the type of problem I described?

Is there some downloadable software utility I could use to test my power supply or evaluate whether my current power supply is up to the job of a DVD-RW (and the rest of my system)?


#4

Most any motherboard monitor can read your voltages, you’d want to watch the 12v rail during loads. Shouldn’t drop below 11.4 at any time, 11.9 is much better.
Most likely it was the burner that was bad, but it doesn’t hurt to be sure.


#5

Originally posted by manco
Is there some downloadable software utility I could use to test my power supply or evaluate whether my current power supply is up to the job of a DVD-RW (and the rest of my system)?

try using Motherboard Monitor.


#6

Thanks for all the advice.

Well, my old CD-RW is still writing without any problem. All the articles I’ve found don’t show a major difference between power consumption of different types of optical drives, usually 15-25W on +5V and +12V.

What do these MBM numbers tell you about my power supply?

playing dvd, copying large files drive to drive and browsing or ripping dvd and browsing:

+12: 12.04, 12.10
-12: -12.07, -12.13
+5: 5.08
-5: -5.03
+3.3: 3.5


browsing only:

+12: 12.10, 12.04
-12: -11.94, -11.88, -12.07
+5: 5.08, 5.11
-5: -5.03
+3.3: 3.5


browsing, burning/verifying cd-r:

+12: 12.10, 12.04
-12: -11.94, -12.07, -12.13
+5: 5.08, 5.11
-5: -5.03
+3.3: 3.5

I just came across this article (Oct 10, 2003), but I’m not sure it refers to the ND-2500A chipset:

NEC Electronics Introduces New Chipset for 8x Rewritable DVD Drives

The mPD63630 achieves high-speed recording while reducing power consumption by taking advantage of 0.15-micron process technology and optimizing clock frequency in each block of the chip. In the mPC3330, the circuit configuration is optimized to reduce amplifier current, which reduces the device’s power consumption. As a result, the chipset has achieved a power consumption rating approximately 30% lower than earlier devices.

Hey, a couple unrelated questions about this article. Does this means the ND-2500A might be firmware upgradeable to read DVD-RAM? Are the ND-2500A and DVR-107 using the same chipset?

As an additional benefit, the new chipset also provides 2X DVD-RAM read capability that enables it to read all of the DVD recording formats currently available on the market, including DVD-R/RW, DVD+R/+RW, and DVD-RAM.

The chipset will be used by Pioneer Corporation and NEC Corporation for their new rewritable DVD drives.


#7

Originally posted by manco
Are the ND-2500A and DVR-107 using the same chipset? [/B]

Yes, according to tomshardware.

( http://www.tomshardware.fr/articlestockage.php?IdArticle=525&NumPage=4 )


#8

Originally posted by DOM107
Yes, according to tomshardware.

http://www.tomshardware.fr/articlestockage.php?IdArticle=525&NumPage=4

Thanks for the link. That’s very interesting to know.


#9

playing dvd, copying large files drive to drive and browsing or ripping dvd and browsing:

+12: 12.04, 12.10
-12: -12.07, -12.13
+5: 5.08
-5: -5.03
+3.3: 3.5

Looks pretty good.


#10

Originally posted by rdgrimes
Looks pretty good.

Good, that’s reassuring. Hopefully, I’ll get a problem-free replacement drive.


#11

Update: The drive wasn’t dead after all.

Well, I spent the week waiting for my RMA drive installing a new power supply and doing a complete format and new system install (just in case).

I got the new drive yesterday and the first disc I tried to burn failed halfway through, just like the old drive.

After going back, double-checking and doing a few simulations, I traced the problem to a bad hard drive or bad sectors in my RAID array. Luckily, I’ve been able to backup most of my data from the failing RAID to other drives and only lost a few non-essential files.

When I burn files from any other drive it works fine. Presumably this means my original drive probably wasn’t bad at all. Too bad I wasted a week and extra shipping charges, but at least I’m up and running now.

So far, I’ve had 7 out of 7 good burns with the older, “good” stock 1.06 firmware on Ridata G04 written with Recordnow DX and verified in DVDInfoPro. I’m not an expert with CD Speed, but the curves are generally smooth, with the occassional fall off and slight jaggedness towards the end, with one exception that had more pronounced spikes at the beginning and end of the test (but was still readable and has no errors).