Near Field Communication (NFC) payment technology already proven to be insecure!

vbimport

#1

Near Field Communication (NFC) payment technology already proven to be insecure!.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/[/newsimage]Security firm Accuvant demonstrates just how insecure Near Field Communication is by remotely hacking various smartphones at the Black Hat conference.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/near-field-communication-nfc-technology-already-proven-to-be-insecure-62648/](http://www.myce.com/news/near-field-communication-nfc-technology-already-proven-to-be-insecure-62648/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I’m supposed to do the promotion for NFC since that’s the subject I’ve been writing on for the last 12 months more than anything else, but it’s still difficult to understand why NFC was created. It is succeeding RFID, but can it really replace cash and plastic cards?


#3

I have to admit that the whole concept of NFC has always struck me as tempting fate.

It’s surprising, but probably a good thing in the long run, that this has been discovered so soon and perhaps this will focus the efforts of the key people involved.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#4

[QUOTE=Wombler;2646018]I have to admit that the whole concept of NFC has always struck me as tempting fate.

It’s surprising, but probably a good thing in the long run, that this has been discovered so soon and perhaps this will focus the efforts of the key people involved.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

Such weaknesses have long been pointed out though. Google knew it and admitted it. Accuvant is just one of the mobile security companies and such announcements are usually meant as self-promotions. Symantec was indeed very good at it.


#5

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2646083]Such weaknesses have long been pointed out though. Google knew it and admitted it. Accuvant is just one of the mobile security companies and such announcements are usually meant as self-promotions. Symantec was indeed very good at it.[/QUOTE]

Fair play to Google for admitting that. I just find it surprising that all the supposedly security conscious financial institutions are so keen on ploughing ahead with NFC based payment systems when all these concerns have already been raised. :rolleyes:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

[QUOTE=Wombler;2646103]Fair play to Google for admitting that. I just find it surprising that all the supposedly security conscious financial institutions are so keen on ploughing ahead with NFC based payment systems when all these concerns have already been raised. :rolleyes:

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

Not many credit card issuers and banks are very enthusiastic and cooperative. The NFC Forum has been publishing a lot of news and announcements and trials, but the Isis project started by the joint venture of the same name among AT&T, Verizon Wireless, and T-Mobile USA has been slow and delayed. What will be provided in Austin of Texas and Salt Lake City of Utah is trial service only. Google started Google Wallet, but extremely few handset, or smartphone, models and extremely few telecommmunication service providers support it. Not many banks, not many credit cards, either. What is worse is that very few offline retailers have the necessary NFC readers on site.

Some of those delays and hesitancy to adopt NFC are due to security concerns whether the threats are serious or not, or real or not.


#7

More news on NFC:

That’s from a Visa executive, one of the very people who have the most to gain by promoting and spreading NFC payment technologies. But he admits it will be two to three years later in the US for NFC to go mainstream. I guess that’s enough for security hardware and application developers to work together to make NFC more resistant and flexible.

So far, a smartphone, even the best one for anyone, is far more difficult and time-consuming to use than a credit card, or a dollar or Yen coin. Also, much more expensive even to try.


#8

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2646272]More news on NFC:

That’s from a Visa executive, one of the very people who have the most to gain by promoting and spreading NFC payment technologies. But he admits it will be two to three years later in the US for NFC to go mainstream. I guess that’s enough for security hardware and application developers to work together to make NFC more resistant and flexible.

So far, a smartphone, even the best one for anyone, is far more difficult and time-consuming to use than a credit card, or a dollar or Yen coin. Also, much more expensive even to try.[/QUOTE]

Yeah there have been adverts on the TV here for credit cards with NFC and mine has already been “upgraded”. :rolleyes:

Also stickers that act like payment cards that you stick to your mobile phone and it charges your phone account.

[B]Wombler[/B]