My internet drops connection when used for a long time

Hie folks, I didn’t know where to post this so i posted it here.

Model of ftth box : Pirelli E4202n
Image of Ftth box :
My problem is that the internet stops workin in the evening, last night it stopped working & when i checked the ftth box it was quite hot. Ive kept this ftth box on top of the set top box, don’t know weather that caused the interference & made it to stop working.

Also the adaptor is making very low noise, the tube like noise in TV’s.

I called the customer care, they said everything is fine from their side so the problem lies somewhere from our side. PLS help.

[QUOTE=Sony92;2680117]
Model of ftth box : Pirelli E4202n

last night it stopped working & when i checked the ftth box it was quite hot. [/QUOTE]

Right there is the problem heat is causing the drop connections. So do you have it standing upright or laying down flat? You might want to stand it upright at 90 degrees and see if that doesn’t help dissipate the heat more effectively and keep the router cooler. Otherwise it might be to late for your router and the heat will kill it and then you have to replace it.

If you are getting cable TV signal but your internet isn’t working or not working well, you might check and plug the router/modem directly into the wall. It’s possible you have a cable signal splitter that went bad.

@Cool colors No, i have it flat, not 90 deg. So i have to buy a stand for it.

@yojimbo197 Mate, this is an ftth connection, if i plug my (dlink) router directly to the cable, it won’t work, as u now all ftth connection requires a box at home to translate data , unlike DSL where ur just connected directly to router, where there was no Ftth box.
Not sure where the splitter is,thats more technical thing & requires a technician.

Here’s the real pic of my Modem & router:

There in the pic u can see the modem shows the Telephone sign as red, b4 it used to be white, but now red. Anyways the telephone is working fine now also.

SAHDISBOSBDTAGABOH?

(This is the logical extension of your fondness for abbreviations instead of real English spellings. I mean, the apparent need to save keystrokes is REALLY aided by this above abbreviation! But to use the correct spellings that are readable, here’s that translation:)

So a hot device is surrounded by other signal-bearing devices that also generate a bit o’ heat?

It’s like a sandwich in an oven. And is there any question about why the middle unit is more like a Reuben than an electronic device?

Since lateral space may be at a premium, the earlier suggestion to “stand them up on end” (vertically) would save lateral space - put them an inch or two apart. That will give much better airflow than these baking goods are enjoying now.

Also note that Signals on a Cable alone will create a static-charge. I dissipate these charges - occasionally - once a week? month? - by detaching both ends of the cable then re-attaching. The disconnected cable will remove all signal-movement, and the re-introduction of new signals is a ‘flushing’ action. A cable with Zero Static Charge will always provide better thru-put.

Your unit can have heat-death, too, where some of its components (like the PCP board) can have deteriorated thru normal use, as well as this oven-effect use, so “replacing” may be the best option.

But stand these units upright, and give them some air-flow space between. That may not solve an already heat-damaged unit, but it will provide a longer-life for all future devices.

(Send me a PM sometime and argue your case for typing abbreviations vs. the easy-reading that full words offer to everyone else. “U” instead of “You” saves two whole keystrokes. Wow. Saving up for ?? what ?? A coffee table?)

Grab some lego cubes and make some room between those 3 devices.

Cheap effective stand? Get a couple of cardboard tubes (paper-towel roller tubes) and cut a perpendicular slice into them, the width of any one of those. Now, you can clip the device down into that slot and you have a custom-made ‘stand’ for any of those. Get a long enough tube (paper towel) and you can put 3 cut-out’s to stand all three up with an inch or two’s spacing between.

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2680136]SAHDISBOSBDTAGABOH?

(This is the logical extension of your fondness for abbreviations instead of real English spellings. I mean, the apparent need to save keystrokes is REALLY aided by this above abbreviation! But to use the correct spellings that are readable, here’s that translation:)

So a hot device is surrounded by other signal-bearing devices that also generate a bit o’ heat?

It’s like a sandwich in an oven. And is there any question about why the middle unit is more like a Reuben than an electronic device?

Since lateral space may be at a premium, the earlier suggestion to “stand them up on end” (vertically) would save lateral space - put them an inch or two apart. That will give much better airflow than these baking goods are enjoying now.

Also note that Signals on a Cable alone will create a static-charge. I dissipate these charges - occasionally - once a week? month? - by detaching both ends of the cable then re-attaching. The disconnected cable will remove all signal-movement, and the re-introduction of new signals is a ‘flushing’ action. A cable with Zero Static Charge will always provide better thru-put.

Your unit can have heat-death, too, where some of its components (like the PCP board) can have deteriorated thru normal use, as well as this oven-effect use, so “replacing” may be the best option.

But stand these units upright, and give them some air-flow space between. That may not solve an already heat-damaged unit, but it will provide a longer-life for all future devices.

(Send me a PM sometime and argue your case for typing abbreviations vs. the easy-reading that full words offer to everyone else. “U” instead of “You” saves two whole keystrokes. Wow. Saving up for ?? what ?? A coffee table?)[/QUOTE]

It’s impossible for a meaningful static charge to build up on a conductor of that sort. We are talking about a antenna cable here? The charge should be uniform as it is a conductor, and the shield is grounded so there’s no free electrons to build up a huge charge. Of course antenna cable has some capacitance as it has two conductors and a insulator between them. But the amount is so small, that there’s no way for signal generated static charge to have anything to do with throughput of a cable modem.

I don’t think that cable companies and tv stations go around re-attaching cables constantly.

Sometimes, especially for humid enviroments, re-attaching cable ends will make a difference, as the wire connector will accumulate rust even when it is attached (it is not hermetically sealed). When you remove connector and re-attach it, this miniscule layer of rust will be wiped away -> everything works again.

But for the orginal poster - the AC adaptor makes noise? Might be normal, might not be. Try with a different AC adaptor (make sure it has enough amps!!).

The title says you drop your connection if used “for a long time”? How long, hours, days, weeks, months?

And some devices will get incredibly hot, and they can handle it. But usually hot is bad, and at least it will shorten the life span of your modem. If warranty is already gone, and you know what you are doing, check the capacitors. If not, do put the box somewhere more less hot… if floor is cold, put it there and as said - sideways.

Once I had a modem which did drop the connection especially when in lot of load. It had two bulged caps, changing them did some good but still I’d get drops. Things changed for the better when I …upgraded the ventilation :cool:

I too think the problem is heat.
Second I looked up your modem/router.

As best as I could tell the telephone light is for VOIP.
So unless you changed something for that I don’t know why it changed from white to red.
If it is just for indicating the actual phone/DSL line has a good connection you might want to see if it is still plugged in well on both ends.

I wouldn’t rule out a bad splitter as suggested.
You can temporarily take that out for testing all that will happen is your telephones will pickup a squeal. That is what the splitter is for to prevent the squeal.

I thought I would show my setup . I got the aluminium plate underneath the modem,etc from a scrap metal yard for 2 dollars. The finned aluminium heat sinc is from a worn out stereo receiver.Small square spacer is from a storm door.

I don’t seem to ever have a heat problem.

Christine covered the abbrevation problem but I agree with her. You use too many.


@Christinebcw : U may be right, what i did now is kept the Black box on top of the printer, so no interference, now i need to make this snakes little organised by putting some sort of clip.

[B]Also i felt some kind of electronic charges(It could be current) , when that silver set up box was On. As soon as i offed it that feeling was also gone. This all was while touching the black box.[/B]

Lets see if problem still persists.

You could hang it on the wall flat. It probably has screw slots on the bottom for doing so.

[QUOTE=Sony92;2680124]@Cool colors No, i have it flat, not 90 deg. So i have to buy a stand for it.

@yojimbo197 Mate, this is an ftth connection, if i plug my (dlink) router directly to the cable, it won’t work, as u now all ftth connection requires a box at home to translate data , unlike DSL where ur just connected directly to router, where there was no Ftth box.
Not sure where the splitter is,thats more technical thing & requires a technician.

Here’s the real pic of my Modem & router:

There in the pic u can see the modem shows the Telephone sign as red, b4 it used to be white, but now red. Anyways the telephone is working fine now also.[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=rwwear;2680427]You could hang it on the wall flat. It probably has screw slots on the bottom for doing so.[/QUOTE]

Ya but need to drill the walls.Have to call the carpenter.

Okay then.

[QUOTE=Sony92;2680430]Ya but need to drill the walls.Have to call the carpenter.[/QUOTE]
That would depend on how handy you are.
If your walls are drywall . You can use a punch awl (gently) . Meaning slowly work it right & left with light pressure forward.
Then use a couple of the plastic mollies with screws.
In this case you want to avoid “drilling” into a wall stud with the awl.
Usually just tapping the wall you can hear the difference where the wall studs are. If you can’t there are both electronic & magnetic stud finders. Even if you have to buy the tools it will probably be less than hiring a carpenter.

[QUOTE=Sony92;2680430]Ya but need to drill the walls.Have to call the carpenter.[/QUOTE]

No you don’t. You need to put a nail or a screw on the wall…

But please do try if this problem is of a heat sort kind of a problem… Put the modem in a place where it doesn’t get too hot. For example away from all the other heat sources (sun, other equipment etc.) and maybe do put a fan blowing cool air on the modem if you’re unsure.

[QUOTE=Mastus;2680499]No you don’t. You need to put a nail or a screw on the wall. [/QUOTE]
Just nailing a nail or screw into drywall is not a good idea . It will eventually get loose. I have had a molly last for years in a wall without getting loose. So take the extra step.

If your walls are a different material then maybe you could nail or screw directly into it.

Now the internet is working fine, so definately it was the heat which was killing the unit. Ive this thing on top of the printer, & D-link router on top of it. D-link won’t cause much trouble i guess, unlike that stupid Motorolla Set top box.

Regarding wall mounting, ill see if i get time, & ya here the carpenter does it free of charge or charge as little as a penny. Lol, u want me to drill holes on wall myself.

Also @ Cholla Nice setup there, but i don’t like too much steel, its good conductor of electricity, so all current if ur device dissipates will flow there, & someday ull get shocked.

Its happening in my old HP printer, even if i touch the USB cable of my printer by mistake it gives me a tremendous shock. So much overflow of current.

As cholla pointed out, if your walls are drywalls, don’t put ordinary screws/nails on it… Put plastic mollies or maybe drywall screws, as the modem won’t probably weigh too much.

And if you get shocked by touching usb cables, something is very very wrong. Properly working devices won’t “dissipate” electricity through their cases, that would be tremendously dangerous. And current can’t actually overflow per se, Ohm’s law does apply - current goes to the path of least resistance.

If you do get shocks on your computer devices, please check that your computer is connected to a grounded outlet. As if it’s not, computer casing will have half of the mains voltage. Dangers and problems of ungrounded PC

In 230VAC countries you’ll have 110 volts AC on the case! It’s quite low amperage though, so you don’t get killed but it shocks a bit and it can be hazardous to other appliances. Especially if the other devices are grounded properly.

For example, you connect video/audio cables from your computer to a stereo/TV which are properly grounded (usually through antenna grounding…) => ZAP. You possibly can see a small spark if doing this.

I do not have grounded outlets in my apartment, so I have to be careful when connecting anything to/from computer. Usually I shut down everything, because I have burned one GPU when connecting video out cables when everything was running.

I think, although I’m a Newbie, this guy could be a troll.

If I am wrong, his AC receptacle may be wired backwards.

[QUOTE=rwwear;2680524]I think, although I’m a Newbie, this guy could be a troll.

If I am wrong, his AC receptacle may be wired backwards.[/QUOTE]

Lol, Why would i waste ur valuable time trolling, u think i don’t better things to do in life. Peace!!

Since the problem is resolved i think it would be nice to close this thread.