"Music" CDR's

vbimport

#1

I see alot of these so called "Music" or "Audio" CDR's in stores (usually at a discount over the "normal" media). Is there any difference at all between CDR's labeled as "Music" and the normal CDR's or is this just a marketing ploy?


#2

Here in Ireland, Music CD-R’s are very expensive compared to normal data CD-R’s. I’ve never seen anyone write an audio CD using a Music CD-R as everyone I’ve spoken to said that normal data CDs work fine for music!

Data CD’s here cost nealy €8 for a pack of 10 with thin jewel cases. Music CD-R’s cost €8 for just 2 blank CDs!

From what I heard, Music CD-R’s use a different dye compared with traditional data CDs and are supposed to be more compatible (less likely to skip) in ordinary CD players.

The only players I’ve seen picky with recorded CDs are DVD players.


#3

Those cd-r’s are exactly the same, except for a special bit set in the wobble of the pregroove. This bit marks the cd-r as an audio cd-r. If this bit is not set, your standalone audio cd burner will not accept the cd (unless your device is modified of course :stuck_out_tongue: ). Pc-based writers don’t check this bit so you can use both kinds in your pc-based writer…

But the catch is that the audio-cdr’s are a lot more expensive than normal cdr’s because an amount of the price of the cdr’s goes to your local copyright protection organisation (like RIAA in VS).


#4

Never use “Music” CD-Rs unless you are using a stand-alone CD-R recorder for your home stereo or jambox that can record them. (Philips and Pioneer make them). If you are buying them and only have a computer CD-RW drive you are just getting ripped off.

I have heard stories of uninformed (or greedy) sales clerks telling other people that “Music” CD-R’s sound better for music than Data CD-R’s - which is nonsense. Music on a Data CD-R sounds exactly the same as a “Music” CD-R.

I wish the manufacturers and stores would tell people what the difference is, but most don’t - they just want to make a sale.


#5

Originally posted by BillyG
[B]Never use “Music” CD-Rs unless you are using a stand-alone CD-R recorder for your home stereo or jambox that can record them. (Philips and Pioneer make them). If you are buying them and only have a computer CD-RW drive you are just getting ripped off.

I have heard stories of uninformed (or greedy) sales clerks telling other people that “Music” CD-R’s sound better for music than Data CD-R’s - which is nonsense. Music on a Data CD-R sounds exactly the same as a “Music” CD-R.[/b]

… on equivalent quality media, of course. Good Audio requires good quality media because of the inherent lesser error correction of the audio format. Sorry to interrupt, BillyG, just thought I’d point out this detail…

I wish the manufacturers and stores would tell people what the difference is, but most don’t - they just want to make a sale.

FYI, here in Canada we pay a hidden fee to the recording insdustry on every CD-R that is sold. It amounts to approximately CDN$.25 or so for each CD-R. Buying Audio CD-Rs is consequently even more expensive!

adam525, I suggest you get a good brand of media that your burner and your CD player equally like, you’ll have great results at great savings. Unless you have a standalone Audio Cd copier, that is… But who here uses them, hmm? :cool: Sometimes I wonder who the h3ll would buy such devices!!! :bigsmile:


#6

I did a lot of tape trading (in the mid 90s) with friends in Canada and I was always mailing them blank High Bias Cassettes (usually mailed without the cases to save on postage) - they almost cost twice as much in Canada as they did in the USA. They also sometimes drove into the USA - bought as many as they could afford and smuggled them (hid them under the car seat!) into Canada.

I bet the RIAA and the USA record companies would LOVE to have a tax on Data CD-R’s since companies and stores sell more of them. I bet the greedy bastards will be trying to get something pushed through congress to have this happen.

I agree with you on using Quality media - the cheaper brands are OK for making backups, copies for the car and test CD-Rs… but I dont use them for music and data I want to keep for a long, long time.

On sound quality—

I burned a CD-R at 2X speed (for making copies and to make sure I got a good burn) from wav files on my hard drive using Nero and noticed it sounded better than the CD-R I burned at 24X speed. The 24X burned CD-R sounded more compressed. And I used the same kind of media for both CD-Rs (Fuji - made by Taiyo Uden).


#7

I got some TDK cdr audios a while ago. the costed a little bit more than the normal ones. they work pretty much the same as well, there is no difference in the sound quality either.


#8

I got a few TDK and Maxells Music CD-R’s in a trade. The Maxells are lousy - I could only burn them at 4X to make them work. I used to use thier tapes all the time but thier CD-R quality is crap.


#9

Originally posted by BillyG
I got a few TDK and Maxells Music CD-R’s in a trade. The Maxells are lousy - I could only burn them at 4X to make them work. I used to use thier tapes all the time but thier CD-R quality is crap.

Not really surprising. Since royalties have to be paid to the recording industry on “music” cdrs which don’t have to be paid on ordinary cdrs, it stands to reason that “music” cdrs will be more expensive, of inferior quality, or both. In short, don’t use them unless you have to.


#10

Originally posted by philamber

Not really surprising. Since royalties have to be paid to the recording industry on “music” cdrs which don’t have to be paid on ordinary cdrs, it stands to reason that “music” cdrs will be more expensive, of inferior quality, or both. In short, don’t use them unless you have to.

If I get Music CD’s in a trade - I use them for music only and burn the damn things at 4X. I have e-mailed people not to send me them but they do anyway.

Most of the stand-alone CD Recorders I have checked out dont record at high speed - most record at 2X or 4X if youre lucky to find one. The low burning speeds are proably another restriction from the USA record companies to keep people from making too many copies. If the goverment and the RIAA ever get control of computer hardware you can forget ever buying a 40X CD-RW.


#11

Originally posted by BillyG
[B]

If the goverment and the RIAA ever get control of computer hardware you can forget ever buying a 40X CD-RW.
[/B]

As long as licensing rights are the way they are , this will never happen. Rememeber, you do not buy a product, you buy the right (license) to it. Which means the support is in fact totally irrelevant. Preventing copying would actually be a breach of licensing because it would prevent your right of use, unless the publishers would make the medium freely available to anyone who holds a license, of course, which will never happen. Just think of the organizational and stocking nightmare it would represent, everyone coming back after 5 years for a new copy of DukeNukem 3D because the disk went bad…


#12

Hi,

Well, in the UK it is illegal to make copies of music cd’s for your own use or otherwise. Crazy but true - and the UK was the best for record sales last year yet many, many people are copying, downloading, etc.

Cheaper prices, albums that are not full of crap, etc, it the key to sales.

It looks like some companies are starting to take a stand and sell for cheaper prices - this has got to be good. Let the greedy ones to to the wall - but time too.

Ice’y