MPAA president Jack Valenti declares war on film pirates

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article MPAA president Jack Valenti declares war on film pirates.

During an unscheduled appearance Monday at ShoWest, the annual motion picture convention, MPAA president and CEO Jack Valenti declared war on film pirates. During the appearance Valenti revealed…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/5519-MPAA-president-Jack-Valenti-declares-war-on-film-pirates.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/5519-MPAA-president-Jack-Valenti-declares-war-on-film-pirates.html)

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#2

appeal to our consciousness, hmm? let’s see: either I feel bad and steal or I feel good and lose money…hmm, difficult decision… I think I gonna steal, hehe :4 they can produce as many trailers as they want, I don’t give a phuck. Those retarded capitalists don’t even know how much fuel costs at the moment. Yeah, right, they are rich, they don’t care. But I do care. because of that damn Iraq problem petrol prices are high as hell and every time I go to the cinema I have to drive and pay. not to forget the cinema tickets. And they think some weird trailer which appeals to my consciousness is going to stop me from downloading movies? MY ASS! stop threatening Iraq, lower the oil prices and we can talk about that then.


#3

This is part of an article from The Times yesterday. I think that that it speaks for itself and shows that Jack Valenti arse is speaking for him. The Times March 04, 2003 Cinema set for the best year since Up Pompeii By Adam Sherwin, Media Reporter BRITISH cinemas are heading for a blockbuster year as figures show that admissions for January were at their highest for more than three decades. A strong post-Christmas showing for The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers and Eminem?s 8 Mile has quashed fears that DVD sales and satellite film channels could kill cinema-going. Cinema admissions were 176 million last year, 20 million more than 2001. The Cinema Advertising Association predicted yesterday that, based on the January figures, admissions this year would reach 182 million, the highest since 1971. Big attractions in 1971 included Disney?s The Aristocats, and British-made family films, such as Up Pompeii and The Railway Children. The films about to dominate this year are multimillion-dollar Hollywood blockbusters, in many cases sequels, ruthlessly marketed at a teenage audience. Cinema is enjoying a global boom, with last year the best in America since 1959, showing sales of more than 1.64 billion tickets, up 10 per cent on 2001. US cinema takings reached an all-time record of $9.5 billion (£5.8 billion). British cinema admissions will probably never match the record 1.6 billion tickets sold during 1945. Audiences fell after the advent of television and, later, video recorders, hitting a low of 97 million admissions in 1990.


#4

And of course they will spread this trailer over all p2p networks with fake names like Lord of the rings.avi :4 Sure, this will stop us from downloading more movies :wink: C’mon guys try to think of something better. And if you cannot find a real solution, stop throwing away money! :frowning:


#5

Jack Valenti is a retard! When will he get it through his head that downloading movies off the internet and copying movies is completely different than walking into a video store and taking a DVD with a movie on it and walking out without paying for it. Copying and stealing are 2 different things!! Plain and simple. People who download movies are as innocent as a 2 year old kidnapped child! The guilty one would be the one who would prosecute an online movie swapper. I am so sick of the claims and how much money the music/movie industry losses each year due to piracy. The film industry is already one of the richest industries in the world and all they can due is bitch about piracy. Where in the hell do they come up with $3.5 billion lost because of piracy? That is a bullshit number. Why in the hell do they bitch about that kind of number when they are already one of the richest industries in the world?


#6

“People who download movies are as innocent as a 2 year old kidnapped child!” Do we really need to read more foolishness like this? I wonder if those trailers will be pirated :9


#7

The question is Jack where is youre conscious.All you people are doing is getting back a taste of youre own medicine.You overcharge us while you and the actors are making billions of dollars driving around in youre porsche at our expense.If you people would charge a fair price you wouldnt have problems and you even go to the extreme of calling us criminals who NEED to make backups of movies we own.I would say you are the money hungry leeches not us.Instead of spending all youre money fighting you could spend less and just lower prices and would make more money in the long run.Heres a business modo for ya JACK GOLDEN RULE:DO ON TO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD LIKE TO HAVE DONE TO YOU!!UNDERSTAND?


#8

Seeing as I can pick up a brand new DVD for under $15 most weeks at Best Buy, I hardly think they’re over charging us. It’s a great argument against CD prices, as sadly most DVD’s I buy are priced less than any CD’s I see. However it’s time to find a bit better ammo than the same old CD rally cry.


#9

I wonder when we’ll see “modified” versions of the anti-piracy trailers on the net (or, for that matter, at cooler theatres). We could have a lot of fun with those…


#10

I see. “The price is too high, so that makes it okay to steal.” “When will he get it through his head that downloading movies off the internet and copying movies is completely different than walking into a video store and taking a DVD with a movie on it and walking out without paying for it.” IT’S THE SAME. The DVD costs only pennies to make. What you are paying for is the movie. They can charge whatever they want for their stuff. If you don’t like it, then the answer is not to buy from them; get your movies from another source. You say you hate the MPAA so much, and yet, whose movies do you watch? You are free-loaders, who don’t want to pay for things that cost money. You say that they MPAA has so much money that it doesn’t matter if you steal from them. That is just stupid. If I steal 500 bucks from you, it probably won’t hurt you in the long run. So you should just let me have it, right?

Jack Valenti is a retard!
Oh, the irony…


#11

SirDavidGuy: well said. so many people try to justify piracy these days with claims of it costing too much or the quality of the content being too low or some other nonsense, but what it comes down to is that you are stealing from these people and they do have a right to their money. Alot of the claims made by the RIAA and MPAA are exagerated greatly, it is true, but this doesnt make things any better. There is little to say for the buying a DVD or watching the DivX/SVCD of it for free argument except that is simply stupid. You stole their movie. However screeners and watching it in the cinema is differnt. The experience just isn’t the same at home :slight_smile: When i hand over my £7 i want the nylon carpets with pop corn trodden into them, the rude staff and the over priced beverages, let alone the immense screen and sound system. Movies just arent the same at home which is why if i like a movie if i get the chance to watch it in the cinema, i do. The methods employed by the RIAA and MPAA to prevent piracy are dubious though. Copy Protected CDs for instance cause hassle for the general consumer and no problem at all for the people that want to rip the cds and distribute them on p2p anyway. This ad campaign by the MPAA isnt entirely a bad idea, but rather unnescary at the moment. What we need to see in the future to reduce piracy is an online method of content delivery, offering lossless music and high quality DivX or SVCD movies for less than it would cost to buy the CD or DVD, although i admit this is difficult to implement it is possible without excessive amounts of DRM.


#12

Copying is not stealing because the person you copied it from still has all of their hard work in their hand. Stealing and copying may both affect sales, but that does not mean they are the same thing. The are some immoral things you can do to affect sales. Stealing would be one of them. Copying however is not an immoral thing to do. Are we all of a sudden one day gona make everything illegal that can have an effect on sales? I don’t see routers being illegal because they allow you to have extra PCs connected to the Internet without having to pay an additional $5. That would reduce the sales of the ISP. Also anybody who would like to see more of my examples on this subject read my last post on this link(it was written for TheTarbaby, but anybody can read it if they wish): http://www.cdfreaks.com/news2.php3?ID=6766


#13

SirDavidGuy: It is NOT the same. If I came into your house and stole $500, then I would have the $500 and you would not. That’s stealing. If you come over to my place with a DVD and I make a copy. You have your copy, I have mine, and the studio hasn’t lost anything either except the ARTIFICIAL scarcity they have foolishly let themselves become dependent on. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with copying. I do think there’s something wrong with price fixing, bribery, third party taxation, selfish agenda setting on the global scale, and hauling Norweigan 15-year-olds into court for their entire teenage years. Hollywood is out of control and needs to be reigned in. They’ve bought the most powerful nation on earth and used it to bully all the others in line. They’ve stolen our public heritage by assassinating the public domain. Oh this is war alright and copying teenagers are NOt the aggressor. Now, I buy, rent, AND copy digital media. I support the artists I like and their craft. But if copying can take some of the profit margins away from the fat cats in suits perhaps we can pare down their influence to a more reasonable level. If that doesn’t work, I think we should boycott the entire entertainment industry across the board until they back off and return what’s ours: the public agenda, legislative influence, public domain, rational copyright law, due process in revealing internet users’ identities, national sovreignty, fair use… The list goes on. Hear that Mr. Valenti? Are you sufficiently “educated” or do I need to make a trailer?


#14

Sadly in your ideas on stealing and copying you forgot the most crucial idea behind such things. Whom ever you steal from, of for your sake “copy” from does not have the authority to give away the media. Take a CD for example. The record company owns the material. Lyrics, Music the whole shebang. They even own songs the band perform live that haven’t been released yet. I think this in and of itself needs to be seriously reconsidered, however that’s not the point of the argument. The simple point is the RIAA owns the material. When you buy a CD, you aren’t buying the material. It’s rather something similar to a lease. You are allowed to listen to it under strict circumstances. Making copies outside of personal backups is not legally allowed. That’s the first flaw in your logic. Steal - To take property (of another) without right or permission. The material is owned by the RIAA, it doesn’t matter if you’re stealing it physically or copying it over the internet. Without their permission to have the copyrighted material (which you gain for your own personal use upon purchase) you are there by stealing. You’re simply describing the type of theft you are commiting by calling it copying. One could just as easily say, “I’m not stealing from Best Buy, I’m just picking up what I want and leaving without paying for it.” Copying is in this case another form of theft. It’s sad how folks try quibble over such small little technicalities to try and rid themselves of guilt. It’s one thing to steal the music, but it takes some balls to actually try and insist you aren’t. Wolverine almost makes it convincing. I won’t even start on the flawed logic behind the router comparison. How one can take a service and compare it to the laws of copyrighting are beyond me.


#15

While I can see both sides of this argument, I think there is an obvious protest that can easily be used by thosed opposed to the MPAA. I think it would be great if someone could get a “screener” and then edit it to change the purpose, and then make it available on the p2p systems. It would be an amazing protest if that modified file was the most shared file of that month.


#16

gg jab, you’re exactly right. If I hack into Porsche’s computer system, COPY their files, and then make a Porsche on my own (just one), that is both illegal and stealing. I’m profiting (not monetarily, but profiting nonetheless) from their hard work without paying them. You can’t get use out of a copyrighted product without the owner’s permission. Music, movies, all of this stuff costs money to make, and if the RIAA wants to charge fifty bucks for a CD that’s fine. They own the rights. It’s your right not to buy it, and it will still be illegal if you download it on p2p. Are you breaking the law? Yes. Are you a menace to society? Probably not. Laws are in place to prohibit both wrongful loss and wrongful gain.


#17

I believe the definition of “stealing” has been rehashed to you in particular many times, Wolverine18. You seem to disagree with every major dictionary in publication on the issue. Let’s just assume that the dictionary contains the correct definition of words. When you buy internet service, you buy the right to use the internet via your connection. Transferring what you are suggesting the movie industry is like to your internet example, you agree that you will pay the internet company five dollars to use a router, and when they charge you for it, you say that they have no right to charge you, since you think that five dollars is too expensive, and since broadband companies make a lot of money anyway, it’s okay to do it.


#18

PIRACY = COPYING MOVIES AND SELLING THEM COPYRIGHT ENFRINGEMENT = MAKING A COPY WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT millionaires should do whine a lot :frowning:


#19

pi·ra·cy Pronunciation Key n. pl. pi·ra·cies Robbery committed at sea. A similar act of robbery, as the hijacking of an airplane. The unauthorized use or reproduction of copyrighted or patented material: software piracy. The operation of an unlicensed, illegal radio or television station.


#20

Yeah, but you are all forgetting the fact that if you steal a cd, the record store has already paid, say, £7 to buy it, so you’re not stealing off the riaa or the artist, just the record store. If you download music, you’re depriving the riaa of their £6.50 profit on that cd and the artist of their £0.10 royalties. So, it depends how you see that… Personally, I’ll download music and then buy what I like. if I didn’t download I’d have a far more restricted variety and would also have bought quite a few albums that were just filler… On the other hand, i can see that a lot of people don’t bother buying at all, but i doubt they ever would anyway. Just my 2 cents…