MP4 Decibel Level?

vbimport

#1

Does anybody know of anything out there that can tell me the DB level of any MP4, free if possible?


#2

[QUOTE=beef barley;2782904]Does anybody know of anything out there that can tell me the DB level of any MP4, free if possible?[/QUOTE]
That’s going to depend on the equipment used and how your listening to it. Also you can look at YouTube they most likely have some examples of what MP4 sounds like. Not everyone has hi-fi equipment to reproduce the same sounds or measure the same levels to compare-unless this is done in a studio made to compare sound levels.


#3

Hmm. I am not entirely sure I even understand the question…

It was the age of cassettes where we tweaked the levels above 0 in peak maximum. MP4 follows the digital standard and should peak at 0. For playback it will depend on the playback equipment to produce up to 140+ db (the absolute maximum for the ear, depending on signal lays somewhere in the 14xdb range - anything above will cause damage).

So, could I ask you to rephrase the question? :flower:


#4

Thanks for responding guys. What got me thinking about db level is the free video volume booster I posted in Freebies Galore. I use it to boost the audio in low volume audio/video files, (MP4s, etc.) I follow their recommendations and boost between +10 dbs - +20dbs, which works without any reencoding necessary. That is why I was wondering if their is anything out there, (to drag & drop the original pre boost file or add the file to it that could tell me the db level of the original file.) I guess it could also work playing the file in a player that would give that information or some kind of meter, maybe???

This is the booster: http://club.myce.com/f3/freebies-galore-340822/index11.html#post2782269


#5

Are you sure there’s no re-encoding? It is possible to pull the audio, do a quick normalization or volume boost, and remux with no noticeable quality loss, and no need to re-encode the video part.

My conventional knowledge tells me you have to open the audio file in some sort of application (like Audacity), tweak the audio, and encode the audio with the adjusted volume. Outside of that, the only on-the-fly audio adjustments I’ve seen were done on a per-app basis. (For example, iTunes allows you to nudge the volume up or down by a little, and will remember that setting for that bit of audio, but the change doesn’t really get applied anywhere else.)


#6

[QUOTE=Albert;2782969]Are you sure there’s no re-encoding? It is possible to pull the audio, do a quick normalization or volume boost, and remux with no noticeable quality loss, and no need to re-encode the video part.

My conventional knowledge tells me you have to open the audio file in some sort of application (like Audacity), tweak the audio, and encode the audio with the adjusted volume. Outside of that, the only on-the-fly audio adjustments I’ve seen were done on a per-app basis. (For example, iTunes allows you to nudge the volume up or down by a little, and will remember that setting for that bit of audio, but the change doesn’t really get applied anywhere else.)[/QUOTE]

I have used it numerous times now and checked that the volume has indeed been boosted. You can optimize one file or a batch of files by adding the file or drag & drop into the window.

Free Video Volume Booster is a free software used to quickly increase the sound volume of any video file. It supports almost any video format, including AVI, DIVX, XVID, MPEG, MPG, MKV, RM, RMVB, FLV, MOV, MP4, ASF, WEBM, etc. Due to its simplicity, Free Video Volume Booster can be used by everyone, just select the video files, increase the audio volume of N decibels (we recommend a value between 10 and 20) and then click the button “Optimize”.

Just to let everybody know I’m not associated with this in anyway, I just know it works. You put the original file in and when it’s done the original file is untouched and the new file opens in a window you designate.


#7

2 minutes and 20-25 seconds to do a 360 mb mp4. Took the file from original to +10 dbs.


#8

Say I play a file at a normal volume level and say that setting happens to be 5 dbs. If I boost that file by +10 dbs, that same setting should be +15 dbs, but the volume will be louder without adjusting the volume control. What I’m looking for is something that will show me the file playing or dormant @5 dbs and then apres boost @15 dbs or whatever. I guess something like this.


#9

I am not too familiar with MP4 (and the sound encode there), but for an mp3, no re-encode is necessary to normalize the volume as it is set in the header. What puzzles me though is the +10 db whatever used here. I am more used to normalize in percentages of maximum 100% (0)

I do normalize custom collections of music I put together and so it is mostly peak maximizing to about 95% (this is to encompass processing on the fly which can add another 2-3 db gain and so to avoid clipping).
Since most of it is flac, they are temporarily converted to .wav-normalized-reencoded to .flac and so no header-normalizing as would be the case for MP3. As is evident, I am a tad old school and make all collections physical collections by copying the actual tracks instead of just creating playlists as it is easier to transport collections for reuse that way.

This was why I said I didn’t quite understand the question as a +10db gain would cause clipping if the file already peaks at 95%.

And just for completeness, Album-gain or average I would use for old albums to keep the level between songs. A typical scenario would be a non-remaster cheap production of a '70s recording with too low volume.


#10

I guess I will have to keep looking, thank you all.