Most durable media - does anyone actually have the answer?

vbimport

#1

After reading several posts here, I suspect no one actually does. :smiley:

But if you want to prove me wrong and give me the much needed lowdown on what criteria is the most important when shopping for media and thinking about long term, reliable storage, and what media should one be looking for…

Then please do it and I’ll be very thankful for it, as with everyone else I’d hate having my backups deteriorate and become unreadable in a few years. :slight_smile:


#2

The most durable: in my opinion, it has to be the user. After all, you can buy the most expensive kind, the top brands, etc. but if you don’t take care of them, it all points back to the user. :slight_smile:


#3

Still no more answers ? Hope I didn’t scare you with my hands down approach to the question. :stuck_out_tongue:

For the record, I have read some of those software tests and such on the stickies. IMHO they’re just not conclusive enough, or maybe what I need is a fortune teller who’ll tell me what DVDR’s will last the most and how much exactly is that in years.

I agree about the user part. I’m safe enough about all the basic precautions with the exception of the EXACT industry presumed environment temperature and humidity levels and I somewhat doubt lots of people will build a temperature and humidity regulated electronic vault just to store their personal use DVD’s. :bigsmile:

Other than that… what should I think about when buying a DVDR if want it to last as much as possible ? Should I bite the bullet and try to go for those which get better inconclusive software tests ? Or just shut up and buy myself some expensive Verbatim and ignore other brands which could be as good or even better for a fraction of the price ?

I don’t actually need the theoretical life spawn which this type of media is supposed to have. I’ll be perfectly satisfied with 30 to 40 years. Will your excellencies the media manufacturers allow me that or are they all too busy making sure that the media will be as crappy as possible and degrade as fast as possible so they can sell more and force people to migrate faster to new standards ?

Questions, questions, questions. :smiley:


#4

most durable = TDK armour plated media and that new datawrite titanium media


#5

I’ve often wondered if reading lasers are powerful enough to make minute changes in the media over repeated reading.


#6

I know of a cheapo standalone made in China DVD player which is able to destroy all DVD-R discs after playing back the disc 2 times. The laser used to read the discs is so strong it destroys the dye…


#7

A-HA!

Lots of elcheapo players around me…

Maybe that’s what happened when I tried an RW just to check a compilation…


#8

LOL I don’t think so, it’s standard CMC media.

It’s sold with lot of BS marketing though (the only thing Datawrite seems to be good at). The “press release” about this media is just hilarious :smiley:

Datawrite Titanium Silver 8X – The Worlds First Bullet Proof DVD!

As we all know titanium is one of the most stable and strongest metals obtainable in the world today. Its strength and reliability is world renowned, even used by NASA on the Space Shuttle.

This latest disc from Datawrite has been codenamed “Titanium”, and utilises the rock solid dye normally found in high-end discs by Verbatim.

From the tough titanium sandblast finish to the highest grade polycarbonate plastic (less than 0.00001% defect), everything about this disc is bombproof and follows on from Datawrite’s ability for making very high quality discs at very affordable prices.

The dye used on this disc is at the forefront of dye technology in the world today. It is 100% rock-solid in terms of compatibility and playback and is a whole generation ahead of any other disc in the market.

Datawrite Titanium will set the standard for all discs to follow.

This disc is practically indestructible through normal usage


#9

I have many el-cheapo players (less than $50) and they don’t pose me a problem. While it is true that laser light does degrade dye - it should be verrrrry slow… strange with your experiences - i want one of them players


#10

Most China made el cheapo players have IDE connection so you can use your DVD-ROM drive to replace the drive of your player…and these players can’t destroy your precious disc.


#11

Really? What’s the brand name … I can think of a few people on my christmas list I’d like to give this to. :bigsmile:


#12

Its a CYBERATHLETE DVD Player a friend bought about 5 to 6 Years ago. Dont know if its still available on the market.


#13

Hmmm Cyberathlete sounds close to Cyberhome and Cyberdrive.


#14

ritek, taiyo yuden, prodisc for meee…
for master i pick pioneer…

i think pioneer cost like $2 to $4 per disc :)))


#15

is it really true that reading laser degrades recording dyes over time?
if that’s the case, then we’re all doomed!!!


#16

Yeah its true. The recording process is done by the laser of the writer destroing the dye. This means the dye has to be somewhat weak against light (if you leave your burned disc in ttoo long your disc gets many errors or wont be readable anymore).


#17

I concur 100%. On another forum that I visit the results with compatibility are ALL OVER the place. It might be somewhat more durable than some media but who cares if they don’t even work.


#18

I thought Pioneer outsourced all of their media now. Or are we talking about authoring discs here?


#19

Pioneer doesnt make DVD=R for general. They sold all theyr equipment. The onnly discs Pioneer is still creating are DVD-R for Authoring


#20

I would go for Taiyo Yuden or Verbatim if u want reliablility.
If ur burner is any good, u should achieve a low error rate with these media, which definitely helps.
But there can be no guarantees … you have to leave the future to the future :wink:

PS: And don’t use RWs for backups. RWs suck.