Monitor with HDCP support required to play HD content in Windows Vista

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Monitor with HDCP support required to play HD content in Windows Vista.

 There is  much new technology to look forward to and generally new technology means  improvement. Windows Vista, (formerly codenamed Longhorn) is the upcoming operating system of  the software...
Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10667-Monitor-with-HDCP-support-required-to-play-HD-content-in-Windows-Vista.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10667-Monitor-with-HDCP-support-required-to-play-HD-content-in-Windows-Vista.html)

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#2

> A Microsoft official confirmed this, saying: “Current computer monitors will work even with high-value content, although the resolution of displayed images might be lower than what you might get with a protected monitor link.” < This sucks. Maybe SlySoft can make some driver, which fools Windows, that a HDCP device is present?


#3

Another reason to go Linux!


#4

New Monitor… only for the HD into PC… :r Normal DVD is good enough… don’t buy nothing on the new tecnology… and try Linux for new OS. The Major think us are only boves to mink and Mate when can’t mink again. To kill the major don’t buy new hd tecnologies…


#5

I’m at the point if given the choice between nothing and Blu-Ray/HD-DVD, I’ll choose nothing. And with the kind of user hostile lockdowns Windows Vista sounds like it’s going to have, yeah… it does sound like one more reason for people to go Linux. I’ll sooner forsake my computer than spend a dime on a Microsoft product.


#6

Not that any (many) of you have a monitor that can display HD anyway… (thats right, 1600x1200 is not full hd) what of us lucky folk who have the Dell XPS Gen 2, a beautiful monitor of 1920 x 1600??


#7

Well people are worrying for nothing - They have cracked DRM haven’t they ? Windows XP activation ? CSS ? ARCOSS? Genuine Advantage ? I’m sure it’s not long before they will break many of the protections found in the upcoming OS. Forget about HDCP monitors, you will also need a super fast processor and/or the latest graphic card with HD acceleration. I think natively, to display the upcoming type of HD content you will require at least a 3Ghz processor (for HD WMV). So I don’t think we should make a big deal out of this, most people now would not play HD smoothly even with those type of monitors :smiley:


#8

…and HDCP was broken about a year ago… :d


#9

LOL! Not surprised - Same with Windows XP activation it was cracked long before the final release. I’m so curious to know how long it will take to break the new protection on those HD DVD/BluRay, if at all possible :wink:


#10

Actually I believe it will play in a lower resolution OR at the content owner’s discretion can be configured to show nothing instead.


#11

But you gotta love how once again an American corporation is using their fearmongering to tell us teh consumer what we can do with the content that we paid for with our hard earned money. Yet another reason to go Linux, and to stop all purchases. A freeware PC is more then doable today, and with winamp casting and stuff you never really need to buy content ever again from our good old RIAA and MPAA fiends. And how in their right mind would use WMV for their HD content? Oh wait I forgot, only 5% of computer users know how to use their computers for more then solitaire :stuck_out_tongue:


#12

This is no surprise. HDCP is already obligatory with HDMI connection. All stand-alone HD players on Blu-ray or HD-DVD will only output the HD content through HDMI or DVI with HDCP. All new HD-ready TVs support HDCP. Did you really expect that when all stand-alone HD players and HD TVs are required to have HDCP, playing the same stuff on computer would not require following the same standard? Although MS is one of the companies in the HD-DVD group but the push to go for DRM and things like HDCP is really comming from the major players in the movie industry.


#13

This is also known as ‘extending the life of DVD’ in the trade :stuck_out_tongue: Oh how foolish the dinosaurs have become.


#14

How many of you guys can pop in a HD DVD and make a copy? And you people who think you can flee to Linux are crazy! Linux won’t even work on new hardware once DRM is 100% active. And remember AMD and Intel both have DRM, so do most of the smaller chips from other companies.


#15

It seems they decided to implement a little bit of Palladium after all. I would choose nothing over blue ray and hddvd, as someone said, if it weren’t for th fact that I could use BD-R for data storage. DVD is good enough for video. I would consider BD-R for data but not for video.


#16

V-exed You gotta be kidding me :smiley: As it is right now dual layer is bloody expensive - do you have any idea how much HD/BluRay blank media will cost ? It will take years before it becomes BARELY affordable, and still… I think it would be extremely risky to store that much backup on ONE single media.


#17

We are not the consumer, we are the cattle eating their grass. The grass is patented, the seed all the grass is patented ever, and we are left with nothing but royalty fees. The carpet is being swept and soon we will not need feet to stand, they will try patenting our ability to even have feet. It’s getting out of control.


#18

Rimmer66, It appears that DVD±R are less reliable than CD-R so it remains to be seen how reliable Blue ray will be in terms of longevity. I don’t think it would be that risky to put that much data on one disc, provided the dics meet reliability standards. I already store my data with redundancy data. So you could just burn 2 or 3 BD-Rs where one has the real data and 2 or 3 contain the backup redundant data. Yeah, it would surely take at least 2 years before the prices start to become reasonable.


#19

You all are some funny ass people xD