Mitsui CDR questions....are these still the best?

Are these good mitsui cdrs? They are silver and blue top/ mitsui cdr for data
Where are these made any ideas?
Mitsui better than TY? :iagree:

Drive Information

PLEXTOR CD-R PX-W4012A V1.06

CD Information

Type : Blank disc, Mitsui Chemicals Inc. (type 6), 79:59:74
Label : -
Tracks : -
Sessions : -
Capacity : - (- sectors)
UPC/EAN Code : N/A
CD-R(W) Manufacturer : Mitsui Chemicals. (type 6), 79:59:74

on package it says …

Mitsui Advanced Media Inc.
cd recordable discs 74min /700 mb
up to 24x media
700mb data logo/bhv

item #00021111

must be a mistake on packaging…isnt 700mb 80 minute cdrs?
& it states disc has 79:59:74 not 74 minutes.

are these older stock mitsuis the best?

Yes. 700 MB are 80 minute CD-Rs.
These discs could be good, but keep in mind that they might have been stored incorrectly. Just check the quality after burning :slight_smile:

I wouldn’t think they are as good as Verbatim Super Azo or TY but they are rare if you got the good original mitsui stuff.

CD-R media manufactured by [I]all[/I] the companies involved in the development of CD-R technologies have all been excellent in my experience (Ricoh/Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals/TDK/Kodak). I would probably rate any of those better than TY even.

CD-R media with TDK or Kodak codes has almost completely disappeared, MAM-E Europe went bankrupt and the Ricoh ATIP is now nothing more than a lame excuse for Ritek’s CD manufacturing. :frowning:
I’m sure the “cheap is good” ideology broke the neck of these companies.

TY… who kinda [I]invented[/I] CDRs, in collboration with Philips and Sony… :stuck_out_tongue:

First TY CDR: 1988

The others came after that(’[I]s[/I]) :wink: (lol)

Dear TY Zealot, know you TY History by heart :bigsmile:

That was jut for fun, [B]TL0[/B], no offence intended at all :flower:

Sorry for interrupting, but what do you think about discs with Mitsui (and Ricoh) code [B]made in Taiwan[/B]? Just asking because all my HP CD-Rs (dated back to 2000-2001) made in Taiwan, with Mitsui (16x) and Ricoh (12x) code in ATIP are now dead. So what do you think, should they be legitimate or maybe they are fakes?

P.S. I’m sure the Ricohs are genuine, because their codes’ form is identical to my Ricoh DVDs’ codes’ form (Traxdata, Maxell etc.).

I have a Mitsui gold CDR made at a friends studio a long time ago (for CD’s) that I posted in the Scans of aging and older CD media thread, it has had a lot of use in my cars, so not the best place and not kept as well as it could have been, but in a case most of the time :slight_smile:

TY may have been first with Cyanine formulation but all the others improved on it :wink: :stuck_out_tongue:

According to some people, the CD-R which performed best in the NIST study was Kodak, IIRC [B]Dolphinius_Rex
[/B] mentioned it somewhere. (This sounds very plausible from the information given in the report).

[B]JIG66666:[/B]

MIT Ricoh/Mitsui :confused: sounds questionable IMO, my examples of these media are EU/MIJ manufactured (pre-2000), no fast degradation problem.

While Phtalocyanine and AZO are widely considered as an improvement over cyanine, thus your point is kinda correct :slight_smile: (but still debatable as TY cyanine formulation is rock stable if not put in direct sunlight See this report of mine and many phtalocyanine CDRs reveal unstable in real-world), the phrasing is not: it sounds like if others had improved the [I]cyanine[/I] technology, which is not the case as far as I know: any non-TY cyanine CDR is highly suspect for stability…
But I guess you meant the AZO/Phtalo vs. Cyanine thing. :slight_smile:

The NIST study is more than three years old now, and things have changed with Mitsui. About all advanced users on this board have abandoned Mitsui as a good alternative, unless it’s old stock. The usual recommendation to go with TY for CDR is still an excellent one as the consistency of these is difficult to beat. Personally I find the high-grade Maxell CDRs (with genuine Maxell technology) just as good.

This is absolutely TRUE. :clap: :clap: :clap:

[B]Francksoy:[/B]

My comparison was between [I]only[/I] media manufactured by the above companies, so TY (Cyanine) vs Kodak (Formazan) vs TDK (MSi), etc. , no ODM/OEM/sub-licensed/etc stuff. The bad cyanine/phthalo stuff is usually concerning other manufacturers AFAIK.

Of course, this is mainly a historical matter anyway, as the others (with possible exception of MKM/Verbatim) have ceased mass manufacturing of their CD-R media so your choice is limited to TY wether you think they are the best or not :wink:

EEEHH says the buzzer. Wrong Kodak invented formazan right. But it was not the dye on most of there media that was sold to the public. The dye on those disc’s was Misui Phtalocyanine. Reason for MAM-A to claime victory over some kodak made disc’s because it was there dye. Which is twice incorrect.
The dye is from MITSUI and the disc was from KODAK. :bigsmile:

vs TDK (MSi), etc. , no ODM/OEM/sub-licensed/etc stuff. The bad cyanine/phthalo stuff is usually concerning other manufacturers AFAIK.

Hmm sorry to say but TY is still the king when I look at my old media.
Mitsui and TDK (MSi) errors seem to rise slowly in my case. Based on the error levels you can consider it still good media but fact is that the errors rise. While the error levels of TY seem to be stable.
However the old Mitsui did have the advantage when it came to playback/burning on drives with worn out lasers !

Of course, this is mainly a historical matter anyway, as the others (with possible exception of MKM/Verbatim) have ceased mass manufacturing of their CD-R media so your choice is limited to TY wether you think they are the best or not :wink:

I wouldn’t limit my choice to TY only. For us european folks there is still something like FUJI germany. Initiall burns of my fuji’s at high speeds (above 16x) are better as TY and so far there stable.

MIT Ricoh/Mitsui :confused: sounds questionable IMO, my examples of these media are EU/MIJ manufactured (pre-2000), no fast degradation problem.

Pre-2000 prodisc was allready making some media for Mitsui !

Thanks for the clarifications & extra information [B]dakhaas[/B] :slight_smile:

The information I read on the Kodak stuff mentioned they had used Mitsui technology aswell but I was not aware that the majority of their media used Mitsui rather than their own dye technology. My own experiences with the other types of CD-R put them as good or better than TY cyanine. (it’s lack of UV stability is annoying :doh: )

The Mitsui ATIP CD-Rs that [B]JIG66666[/B] has must be these Prodisc manufactured ones, with the Ricoh ATIP CD-R being Ritek manufactured I guess, looking at their history.

Store them correctly and TY seems to be the more stable as my Mitsui and kodak disc’s.

I also wonder if TY’s disc’s would actually perform better when it comes to UV stability if they used black polycarbonate as the newer fuji’s have.

The Mitsui ATIP CD-Rs that [B]JIG66666[/B] has must be these Prodisc manufactured ones, with the Ricoh ATIP CD-R being Ritek manufactured I guess, looking at their history.

Yes but I think ritek started production after 2000 ! So that’s why i left it out.
I could be wrong.