Millions of PCs are still running insecure Windows XP

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Millions of PCs are still running insecure Windows XP[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2014/05/winxppro-95x75.png[/newsimage]

Windows XP, which was exactly 15 years old last week, is still installed on millions of computers worldwide. Even now the OS no longer receives security updates from Microsoft. The numbers come from statistics compiled by research company Net Applications.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/millions-pcs-still-running-insecure-windows-xp-80790/](http://www.myce.com/news/millions-pcs-still-running-insecure-windows-xp-80790/)

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#2

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2783067]We’ve just posted the following news: Millions of PCs are still running insecure Windows XP[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2014/05/winxppro-95x75.png[/newsimage]

            Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/millions-pcs-still-running-insecure-windows-xp-80790/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.[/QUOTE]

Again why am I not suprised… :stuck_out_tongue:


#3

My father still runs XP on his machine. I’m not sure if it can run newer versions of Windows without massive lag. I’ve considered putting a GNU/Linux system on his machine, but I’m not sure he can sync his pictures, music, etc. from his iPhone.

Luckily, he never seems to use the machine, anyway. I can’t remember the last time it was even powered on.


#4

My thought is that Net Applications doesn’t really know if they are secure or not, just that they are still running Windows XP.

I am one of those still running a couple Windows XP
I feel mine are secure enough.


#5

^ Agreed.
There is a bias towards XP=Insecure, but as you indicate… That is just out of the box, but you can make your XP into Fort Knox if you like and have the knowledge. Privacywise it is among the best, compared to Windows 7-10 out of the box it is by far the most secure system, but none seem to care mentioning that fact.

What I would be way more worried about are the hardware routers out there serving as the household’s gateway to the net.
Many of those have never seen a firmware update since they were installed. Some years ago, and considering that new exploits targeting vulnerabilities in these devices surface several times a year, this is the REAL security issue.

In other words, this toll on the bell for Windows XP is a little like a storm in a glass of water compared to the real issues and you can at least proudly say that you decide what uses bandwidth :flower:


#6

Very useless, outdated OS. Its marketshare is mostly from bootleg installs in China anyway. Irrelevant in 2016.


#7

[QUOTE=Shammil;2783200]Very useless, outdated OS. Its marketshare is mostly from bootleg installs in China anyway. Irrelevant in 2016.[/QUOTE]

For what purpose would be the natural follow-up question. While support for the OS is declining, many programs still supports it.
I do have a physical install for among other things to do ring 0 aka true kernel debugging (the kind where you can single-step yourself backwards out of a BSOD a.o.). There are a few very advanced but still good tools that stopped development with the platform and in my work reviving old programs, it proves great value and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.
I have also virtualized several XP installs the last few years for businesses using the OS for single or multiple tasks in a corporate environment and so there are more to this than your everyday online activity.

Obsolete does not mean useless. Take the Commodore Amiga which I run in an emulator as an example. I can not think of any better install apart from maybe Windows 3.1 for surfing malware-infected sites. None of the current malwares can run in a 16-bit environment as would be the case for Windows 3.1’s NE executable format, let alone Motorola MC68000’s architecture and executable format. Both ways are great to download and handle malware files, even doing an initial check in a hex editor with no fear of becoming infected.
Using Windows 7-10 for the task would make for much more work and be way more dangerous than simply starting one of the two and download it, or being able to download a program from an infected site. :flower: