Millenniata Celebrates Completion of Blu-ray Optical DISC

vbimport

#1

SALT LAKE CITY–(BUSINESS WIRE)–U.S.-based Millenniata (www.mdisc.com) today announced the completion of its new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray, with mass production to begin in early August 2013.

RITEK Corporation, the leading manufacturer of optical storage media in the world, will begin production of the new M-DISC Blu-ray as part of its manufacturing agreement with Millenniata. Imation and RITEK will distribute and market the M-DISC Blu-ray through their established distribution and reseller channels. Imation will distribute under the TDK, Memorex and Imation brands, and RITEK will distribute under the RITEK, Ridata and Traxdata brands.

With the addition of the new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray to its products, Millenniata has significantly expanded the breadth of the market addressed by its permanent data storage solution, greatly increasing the storage capacity, ease-of-access and usability of the M-DISC. The M-DISC Blu-ray offers five times the storage capacity of the standard 4.7GB M-DISC DVD, and is writable and readable on any Blu-ray drive – an enormous step for Millenniata and the convenience of this permanent storage technology.

“The new M-DISC Blu-ray and its 25GB of storage enhances our ability to meet the ever-growing digital storage needs of consumers,” said Paul Brockbank, Millenniata president and CEO. “Now businesses, as well as individuals, can take advantage of both the added capacity and accessibility of the permanent M-DISC.”

In addition, Millenniata recently completed an extensive test program of the M-DISC technology based on the ISO/IEC 10995 Standard. This patented technology is at the core of both the M-DISC DVD and the M-DISC Blu-ray. The test evaluates the life span of optical media such as DVD and Blu-ray. Millenniata tested the M-DISC DVD, as well as several other high-quality archival DVDs.

The test results verify Millenniata’s claim that the M-DISC DVD lasts in excess of 1,000 years, indicating that the median expected life of the M-DISC DVD is 1,332 years. Other DVDs that claim to have a median expected life of 30 to 100 years lasted only a fraction of their purported lifespans, with a median expected life of only 2.7 to 3.0 years.

“With results like these, it’s not surprising that many consumers don’t immediately think of optical storage when they want to preserve their data,” said Brockbank. “The results of this test show that M-DISC technology is in a class of its own.”

The ISO/IEC 10995 Test Standard, which exposes optical media to high temperature and humidity conditions for extended periods of time to determine a product’s lifetime, is common in electronics, automotive and many other industries.

About Millenniata

Millenniata has become the standard in permanent data storage, creating partnerships with industry leaders Hitachi-LG Data Storage (HLDS), Imation, Acer and RITEK. Millenniata’s patented M-DISC™ technology is the world’s first truly permanent digital storage solution proven to last centuries when tested under ISO standards. The M-DISC, including the new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray and the standard 4.7 GB M-DISC, is constructed of inorganic rock-like materials, resistant to light, temperature and humidity. This combination allows information to be written once and read forever. For more information, visit www.m-disc.com.


#2

How much would a BD-R cost?


#3

Other DVDs that claim to have a median expected life of 30 to 100 years lasted only a fraction of their purported lifespans, with a median expected life of only 2.7 to 3.0 years.
Virtually none of my DVDs have degraded significantly after three years (not counting RITEKG05), and almost none of them are archival grade with a high claimed lifespan.

This is the kind of bullshit statement that makes me question all the other claims from M-Data. :rolleyes:


#4

Are these BD-R discs selling yet? The PR said mass production in August and it’s featured on mdisc’s front page currently, but I see no sign of it anywhere I know of.

Given how they’re writable by any burner, I wonder how different they are. Also, would this not imply requiring new firmware/strategy?


#5

They’re made by Ritek. That should be all the warning customers need to steer clear.


#6

It is funny the way they describe their data layers as ‘rock like’.

If these discs are writeable on any Bluray drive then surely they cannot differ much from standard BD-Rs?


#7

[QUOTE=elgario;2707036]It is funny the way they describe their data layers as ‘rock like’.

If these discs are writeable on any Bluray drive then surely they cannot differ much from standard BD-Rs?[/QUOTE]

Maybe a blu ray writing laser is already High powered and thus dont have an need for a special drive.
That’s what i think.
And about the longvity if its really tested by ISO/IEC then you can be sure the test is reliable its the only real official test method in the whole world for determing the lifetime of blank media.