Millenniata and Verbatim-MKM Enter Worldwide Strategic Alliance

vbimport

#1

Millenniata and Verbatim-MKM Enter Worldwide Strategic Alliance for Co-Branding and Joint Development for Archival-Grade M-Disc Technologies and Discs

Verbatim and its parent company, Mitsubishi Kagaku Media, will begin marketing and selling co-branded Verbatim and M-Disc DVDs and Blu-ray discs to consumers and enterprises in storage capacities from 4.7GB to up to 200GB; Agreement further launches joint development efforts designed to “push the boundaries of archival-grade data storage technologies and capacities”

AMERICAN FORK, Utah and CHARLOTTE, N.C., Sept. 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Millenniata and Verbatim today announced a global M-Disc® partnership that Millenniata’s Chief Executive described as “deep and wide-ranging.”

Under the partnership, Verbatim—and its parent company, Mitsubishi Kagaku Media (MKM)— will begin worldwide marketing and sales programs of M-Disc-branded DVDs and Blu-ray™ discs (BDs) and technologies to consumers and enterprise customers. MKM will also pursue M-Disc partnerships with archival software developers, and OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers) in the personal computer and optical disc drive (ODD) markets, including M-Ready® ODD manufacturers.

Initial Verbatim and MKM M-Disc product offerings under this agreement will include the following:

End-users and SMBs*

4.7GB DVD M-Discs
25GB BD-R M-Discs
100GB BD-R BDXLâ„¢ M-Discs
Enterprise Customers

100GB BD-R BDXLâ„¢ M-Discs
200GB double-sided, Blu-ray Disc (BD-DSD) M-Discs
Additionally, Millenniata, Verbatim and MKM have agreed to joint development efforts designed to expand the capabilities and capacities of archival-grade data storage technologies both in terms of longevity and data storage capacity.

“We are excited about such a deep and wide-ranging strategic partnership with Verbatim, a global leader in data storage technologies, and its parent company, Mitsubishi Kagaku Media,” said Paul Brockbank, CEO of Millenniata. “Clearly, the explosive growth in digital content creation at the consumer and enterprise level is continuing to accelerate and we are proud to provide the world’s best technology and media to preserve that critical digital content. We understand how important preserving our most precious data is; so does Verbatim. That is why we are so pleased to be able to partner with Verbatim and MKM to advance the availability of M-Discs in multiple formats, storage size capacities and to create future products together that expand the capacity and longevity even further.”

Millenniata’s patented M-Disc technologies for archival-grade optical Blu-ray discs and DVD disc storage mean that users can record and store data that can last for up to 1,000 years.

“Millenniata has clearly developed outstanding archival-grade, data storage capabilities with its M-Disc-branded technologies,” said Tetsuya Mutsu, President of MKM. “Verbatim is the world’s leading supplier of optical media. By combining the M-Disc, Verbatim and MKM brands together, we are further strengthening our position in the market and broadening our portfolio of archival-grade data storage products for enterprises and consumers.”

Verbatim/MKM anticipates that its co-branded Verbatim and MKM/M-Disc DVDs and Blu-ray discs will be available in late 2014.

To learn more about co-branded Verbatim and MKM/M-Disc consumer or enterprise archival media products, please visit www.MDisc.com, call Millenniata at 801-610-1998, or visit www.Verbatim.com.

M-Disc Technologies

Millenniata’s writable M-Discs utilize a layer of patent-protected rock-like, inorganic materials that mean archival-grade M-Disc and Blu-ray discs are virtually impervious to environmental exposure, unlike typical writable BD or DVD discs. Using these patented rock-like materials means that it is nearly impossible to degrade the data stored on an M-Disc Blu-ray discs or DVD disc.

In fact, Millenniata’s patented M-Disc technology has been proven through ISO/IEC 10995/16963 standard longevity tests and is the only data storage solution to withstand rigorous testing by the U.S. Department of Defense. Based upon Millenniata’s extensive laboratory tests, M-Discs have an expected usable lifetime of up to 1,000 years.

About Mitsubishi Kagaku Media / Verbatim

Mitsubishi Kagaku Media, a 100% subsidiary of Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, is a company that plans, develops, manufactures and sells products based on the technology and knowledge of the Mitsubishi Chemical Group.

Verbatim is a global brand of Mitsubishi Kagaku Media sold in over 120 countries worldwide. According to SCCG/JRIA data, Verbatim has had the largest market share of recordable optical discs (CD/DVD/BDs) sold worldwide by brand for eight consecutive years (from 2005-2012).

About Millenniata

Millenniata has transformed the world of data storage with its archival-grade M-Disc technologies, advancements that allow data to be “written once and read forever.” For more information, please visit www.MDisc.com.

  • SMBs = Small- to Medium-sized Businesses

Millenniata, M-Disc and M-Ready are registered trademarks of Millenniata, Inc. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

CONTACTS
For Millenniata: David Politis, 801-556-8184, me@DavidPolitis.com, @DavidPolitis
For MKM/Verbatim: MKM-EnterpriseDisc@cc.m-kagaku.co.jp

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/millenniata-verbatim-mkm-enter-worldwide-130000660.html


#2

Very interesting. Thanks Pepst. :flower:

Wider distribution of Millenniata discs would be good, and it might bring the price down a bit.


#3

This is a good find. I’ve been watching the Mdisk story unfold for a long time and wondering why such a promising technology was taking so long to be picked up by optical storage users. Maybe now we’ll see this take off. Thanks for posting.


#4

Interesting. A highly reliable 100/200gb disc sounds pretty cool to me!


#5

Any of you guys know when we might start seeing Mdisks showing up at mainstream retailers since this alliance between Millenniata and Verbatim?


#6

Though I’ve just read the forum has observed the lowering of quality overall of Verbatim blank media (one of the reasons I’ve collected Vbm bargains from the recordable DVD family manufactured in the middle of the last decade :)- thanks a lot to the detailed + learned knowledge on this site :bow:) I’m disappointed they have become involved with m-Disk (how many more lifetimes do you really want your archive to last to what additional tax(money,stress + time) for being an 1st gen user of new tech cost compared to using a more varied back up medium than ANOTHER OD one, given the currently available tried + tested archive solutions and/or any replacement for a media you are migrating from( if assuming your datas loss in that importance to you given such interests).M-disk [I]even[/I] on their HYPERBOLE city/scientific method FREE promo site( when you read it, YOU could not have MISSED (like with the next piece of manipulating propaganda) that [B]D-I-S-K ROT,yes that’s spelt R-O-T[/B] :shudders: sounds like all our OD media has succumb to the equivalent of a sudden biological viral epidemic ::Z (EXCEPT M-disk [I]naturalment[/I] :eek:) will suggest for their own benefit their possibly crApple like nefariousness (from even writing such ‘ham’ to promote their product) that M-disk beats the statistical advantage of spreading redundant media in location + back up media type.

Given their lack of scientific method integrity this;

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) has defined longevity testing standards for optical disc media. These ISO Standards (IOS/IEC 10995 and ISO/IEC 16963) are based on the work done by Arrhenius and Eyring that relates the effects of testing at elevated temperatures and humidity to the lifetime of a product. This is the same type of testing done to determine the lifetime of integrated circuits, paints, cars, and many other things

May sound wonderful but also what we’ve heard a 100 times or more with optical media + scientifically calculated life before so I think unlikely there is no accurate SCIENTIFIC way to calculate the life of OD media unless you think the most advanced weather forecasting of today could accurately predict weather - I MEAN THE WEATHER in 100 YEARS TIME ROTFLMAO :smiley: too many variables for our current models/computing systems to cope with given the size of the nos of variables involved. Contrast this to our prediction of the solar system orbits + we can predict them like clockwork i don’t know how many eons into the future( as the nos of variables to calculate are small + all interactions accounted for, [I]see what I’m saying[/I]:confused: - but as a not impressed scientist I see no reason why this is not hyperbole as the rest, they expect their audience to their site never to actually have this knowledge thus not contradict they are taking things out of context so making their main ‘advantage’ point with slick + insidious Machiavellian psychology - however I have no clue about such area of scientific you would need someone who is knowledgeable but completely independent to M-disc

To sum up given the lack of integrity of promo makes me cynical about there intention.You could fire back at my criticism to say if their wasn’t any early adopters to new tech to pay the price there wouldn’t be any new tech for the majority - except this is [B]NOT[/B] new tech( think of ALL the advantages you pay being an early adopter for a TRULY new tech like SSD:iagree:) its the reheating of lefts overs, a technology( OD + moving parts unless the magnetic version of the optical drive ever stops being expected) that has mostly exhausted its potential with one foot in the grave + as skillfully pointed out in this linked thread(NB note the ref about currently available specialized ARCHIVAL OD media BEAMING advantages + how it offers practically the same as M-disc but at a fraction of the cost:D) DO YOU REALLY want OD media to last many lifetimes or is their hyperbole getting to your subjective appeal shiny + new :confused:

http://club.myce.com/f33/anyone-tried-m-disc-327576/index2.html

Has anyone from a scientific or historical background (the science of evidence/bias) read their site + thinks its perfectly exceptable as a source of info for a new tech. [B]Anyway do not the very experiences of users on this site CONTRADICT WHOLLY what M-Disk state as FACT about the PLAQUE of “Disk ROT” LMFAO.[/B]

Finally if this is a(not very bright but are “store detectives”? they are so difficult to spot just like RCA ;)) SHILL employed by M-disk then the scientific method is NOT the REASON for the advances that MAKE today’s ‘Western’ civilization;

see RCA’s other ‘classics’ from thread;

http://club.myce.com/f33/archival-media-333988/

[QUOTE=RCA;2703624]The technology may be new(er) but it can be read by other drives that are NOT M-Disc ready.

I suppose some people are ok with ideas like, “use multiple platforms, brands, etc, etc.”. I don’t have time for that. I don’t want to be a slave to transferring my media every 5, 10 . . . . ever. I just want to write it once and be done. Why should it be any other way?

Data rot is so prevalent that people have become conditioned to purchasing, repeatedly, new hard drives, new flash drives, more discs, discs, discs. The research is there about data rot, data degradation, data corruption.

The bottom line is, almost all optical media contains organic dyes. M-Disc does not. It has been ISO 10955 certified. The facts speak for themselves. Everything else is hyperbole.

As soon as the BR M-Disc comes out (not requiring a specific BR writer) I’ve got dozens of Mini DV taps and thousands of RAW images that will be permanently archived. Anything different than that is temporary, will require more time, and more money.

I’d like to hear what you decide on.[/QUOTE]

OK guys form an orderly cue there’s plenty of Mdiscs for everyone! - Mdisk doesn’t want any of you to have an accident… and lose your M-disc “buying potential” ROTFLMAOPMP


#7

“I’d like to hear what you decide on.” :flower:


#8

There might be some hype involved in the Mdisk campaign which could account for the buying public being skeptical of the need to invest in this still poorly available format. Also, I found this information by TDK from 2010 in which there’s a claim that its Blu Ray data layer isn’t organic but is metal and mineral based instead. If accurate, this means the Mdisk’s usage of non organic compounds isn’t exclusive. Highlights are mine.

The high-sensitivity [B]inorganic recording material[/B] utilized by TDK for the write-once type BD-R is completely different than the recording materials used for CD or DVD. TDK Blu-ray Discs’ inorganic material is impervious to light, making the discs exceptionally well suited for archiving data. [B]Composed of copper and silicon, TDK’s exclusive CuSi recording material delivers remarkable, long-lasting performance.[/B] The recording material enables fast recording and playback speeds and also makes it possible to realize massive capacities through multi-layering. For TDK’s rewritable BD-RE Blu-ray Disc media, a specially designed high-sensitivity phase change recording material is utilized. The material is so stable that a TDK Blu-ray Disc shows virtually no performance degradation even after it has been overwritten 10,000 times. The 25GB and 50GB BD-R and BD-RE discs offer 2x (72Mbps) rated recording speed. Based on simulated acceleration tests, TDK’s archival life expectancy rating for Blu-ray Disc media is more than 50 years.

Doesn’t CuSi sound a lot like Mdisk’s recording material?

I’m still very interested in the Mdisk format for archiving important data but now I wonder if Blu Ray disks with non organic data layers might be a better option.


#9

[QUOTE=symphonic100;2745158]There might be some hype involved in the Mdisk campaign which could account for the buying public being skeptical of the need to invest in this still poorly available format. Also, I found this information by TDK from 2010 in which there’s a claim that its Blu Ray data layer isn’t organic but is metal and mineral based instead. If accurate, this means the Mdisk’s usage of non organic compounds isn’t exclusive. Highlights are mine.

The high-sensitivity [B]inorganic recording material[/B] utilized by TDK for the write-once type BD-R is completely different than the recording materials used for CD or DVD. TDK Blu-ray Discs’ inorganic material is impervious to light, making the discs exceptionally well suited for archiving data. [B]Composed of copper and silicon, TDK’s exclusive CuSi recording material delivers remarkable, long-lasting performance.[/B] The recording material enables fast recording and playback speeds and also makes it possible to realize massive capacities through multi-layering. For TDK’s rewritable BD-RE Blu-ray Disc media, a specially designed high-sensitivity phase change recording material is utilized. The material is so stable that a TDK Blu-ray Disc shows virtually no performance degradation even after it has been overwritten 10,000 times. The 25GB and 50GB BD-R and BD-RE discs offer 2x (72Mbps) rated recording speed. Based on simulated acceleration tests, TDK’s archival life expectancy rating for Blu-ray Disc media is more than 50 years.

Doesn’t CuSi sound a lot like Mdisk’s recording material?

I’m still very interested in the Mdisk format for archiving important data but now I wonder if Blu Ray disks with non organic data layers might be a better option.[/QUOTE]

I was under the impression that all non-LTH Blu-ray media was inorganic.


#10

[QUOTE=warcraft82;2745637]I was under the impression that all non-LTH Blu-ray media was inorganic.[/QUOTE]

Yes, according to this link HTL recordable BD is non organic.

Not all Blu-ray discs are created equal, but does BD-R quality matter?

As a DVD+R user, this is interesting because it sounds like HTL BD is a more practical alternative to Mdisk even if it doesn’t offer 1000 yr. data retention.