Microsoft: Windows 10 PCs 58% less likely to encounter ransomware than Windows 7 PCs

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft: Windows 10 PCs 58% less likely to encounter ransomware than Windows 7 PCs[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/07/Windows_10_Logo_04-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Windows 7 users more frequently encounter ransomware than Windows 10 users, according to a report from Microsoft. The software giant added security measures to Windows 10 that should protect users against ransomware and therefore Windows 10 users are better protected than Windows 7 users.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-windows-10-pcs-58-less-likely-encounter-ransomware-windows-7-pcs-80888/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-windows-10-pcs-58-less-likely-encounter-ransomware-windows-7-pcs-80888/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Well, it would largely depend and I know people on XP more secure than the common Windows 10 user…

This is out-of-the-box for the 1607 Anniversary update, given that defender is active with cloud protection enabled and you surf the web with Edge. I didn’t quite get what comparative Windows 7 install it is, but this is mostly Microsoft propaganda :bigsmile:


#3

And don’t we all place so much reliance on Microsoft’s word about security.


#4

I’m sure Windows 10 would have 90% fewer if it blocked script file extensions by default and that Microsoft office would not open macro-containing documents by default unless a certain registry edit is made.

For example, just think of one good reason why an average person would need to launch a js, scr or ws file or a macro-enabled document? :wink:

Better still, if Virus checkers offered the ability to automatically quarantine e-mails containing executable, script or macro-enabled attachments including in zip, rar, etc. archives, that would likely block 99% of ransomware.


#5

Ë„ :iagree:

And do frequent backups of your documents to storage not normally attached to your computer and do regular backups of your installation.
In 2016, I simply can’t think of a better routine to minimize the impact a ransomware infection has. 58% less likely, what does that really mean anyway?


#6

I just after watching a TV programme on cyber security that mentioned just how easy a hacker was able to run code on peoples computers - USB sticks.

A researcher placed an executable file on 100 sticks titled ‘CV’ with a Word document icon. These sticks were randomly placed to simulate people accidentally dropping them or leaving them behind such as on benches, café tables and so on. The executable file did nothing more than ping a server.

Before all the sticks were fully distributed, their server already started receiving pings. So that executable could have been anything a hacker wanted to run such as ransomware, screen capture, keylogger, etc. Of the 100 that were distributed, they received pings from 34 of them, which included university and corporate networks and private individuals.

It also shows that hackers don’t need special USB sticks that send keystrokes, etc. - Just ordinary USB sticks with an executable file disguised with an innocent looking file name such as ‘CV’.


#7

[QUOTE=Seán;2783848]I just after watching a TV programme on cyber security that mentioned just how easy a hacker was able to run code on peoples computers - USB sticks.

A researcher placed an executable file on 100 sticks titled ‘CV’ with a Word document icon. These sticks were randomly placed to simulate people accidentally dropping them or leaving them behind such as on benches, café tables and so on. The executable file did nothing more than ping a server.

Before all the sticks were fully distributed, their server already started receiving pings. So that executable could have been anything a hacker wanted to run such as ransomware, screen capture, keylogger, etc. Of the 100 that were distributed, they received pings from 34 of them, which included university and corporate networks and private individuals.

It also shows that hackers don’t need special USB sticks that send keystrokes, etc. - Just ordinary USB sticks with an executable file disguised with an innocent looking file name such as ‘CV’.[/QUOTE]
One other good reason to disable “AutoRun” as well. Making users use Limited accounts and disable AutoRun is the first step to harden a system resource but Users and IT seems to have forgotten this simple measure would stop most infections.


#8

[QUOTE=Seán;2783848]It also shows that hackers don’t need special USB sticks that send keystrokes, etc. - Just ordinary USB sticks with an executable file disguised with an innocent looking file name such as ‘CV’.[/QUOTE]

Yep, ‘curiosity killed the cat’.
No wonder, people open attachments from unknown senders and of course in this case with such a filename, even honest people will open the CV to maybe be able to give the USB stick back.

[Sarcasm] And Microsoft defaults to hiding the extention for known filetypes to aid them in being less secure - They ‘really’ take security seriously now don’t they [/Sarcasm] :Z