Microsoft wants personal data of Comcast subscriber that activated thousands of stolen Windows keys

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft wants personal data of Comcast subscriber that activated thousands of stolen Windows keys[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2013/01/myce-windows8-insert-key.jpg[/newsimage]

Microsoft wants the personal details of a Comcast subscriber that has activated thousands of copies of Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server and Office 10 using stolen or abused codes. The company has asked a federal judge permission to serve Comcast with a subpoena to identify the pirate.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-wants-personal-data-comcast-subscriber-activated-thousands-stolen-windows-keys-78824/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-wants-personal-data-comcast-subscriber-activated-thousands-stolen-windows-keys-78824/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

And of course Comcast will bend over backwards to comply…


#3

hmm, What a naiv person would end up in such a mess. Not that I care about the illegal business, but still : I once heard that intelligence is a fine feature used by those who owns it while those having none are happy as they do not know it’s missing or something along that line, I think it applies here.
Then again, IQ would normally mean not doing the crime in the first place.


#4

They have indeed been extremely careless, or maybe intentionally reckless. (I assume they were running an open KMS server. Or was it something else?)

Of course what the legal profession ‘conveniently forgets’ is that the IP address alone cannot identify the actual user or the computer used.

Even Comcast can only identify the holder of the account, not the person or computing device used to commit the offence.

There is a independent ISP in this country (Andrews and Arnold) who have stated publically that when they receive an legal order from the Police or security services for them to identify a [I]user[/I] (based on IP address) will issue a standard reply - [I]“we cannot identify a user”[/I].

If they come back and ask for the account holder’s details then the ISP will of course comply. But one gets the impression that most incorrectly worded requests are not pursued further, suggesting that many are simply [I]‘fishing expeditions’[/I].

[QUOTE=Xercus;2769867]Then again, IQ would normally mean not doing the crime in the first place.[/QUOTE]
Ah yes, that old paradox - you must be insane to commit a crime, but insanity means you cannot be held responsible for your actions. Can’t fault the logic, but lawyers don’t seem to appreciate logic… :rolleyes:


#5

[QUOTE=Ibex;2769907]They have indeed been extremely careless, or maybe intentionally reckless. (I assume they were running an open KMS server. Or was it something else?)

Of course what the legal profession ‘conveniently forgets’ is that the IP address alone cannot identify the actual user or the computer used.

Even Comcast can only identify the holder of the account, not the person or computing device used to commit the offence.

There is a independent ISP in this country (Andrews and Arnold) who have stated publically that when they receive an legal order from the Police or security services for them to identify a [I]user[/I] (based on IP address) will issue a standard reply - [I]“we cannot identify a user”[/I].

If they come back and ask for the account holder’s details then the ISP will of course comply. But one gets the impression that most incorrectly worded requests are not pursued further, suggesting that many are simply [I]‘fishing expeditions’[/I].

Ah yes, that old paradox - you must be insane to commit a crime, but insanity means you cannot be held responsible for your actions. Can’t fault the logic, but lawyers don’t seem to appreciate logic… :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

LOL I said ‘IQ would [I]normally[/I]…’. There are very intelligent people who have crime as their profession, executing their work with military precision and great caution, timing the operation in seconds.

In this case however, it certainly may seem like they cannot be held responsible for their actions :doh:


#6

Call the FBI.


#7

I don’t know if Microsoft can get that IP address. After all, Comcast hasn’t been known to cooperate with anyone or anything. Just ask anyone who’s been in contact with Comcast customer support.

In any case, I’ll bet the IP address belongs to someone running an internet tunnelling service, eg a VPN service, TOR node, or proxy service. If so, chances are slim that Microsoft will be able to find the user.