Microsoft Security Essentials scores zero points for malware detection in antivirus test

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft Security Essentials scores zero points for malware detection in antivirus test[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2014/01/microsoft-security-essentials-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

German antivirus test organisation AV-Test.org has tested 28 antivirusscanners and Internet Security Suites for Windows 7.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-security-essentials-scores-zero-points-for-malware-detection-in-antivirus-test-74514/](http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-security-essentials-scores-zero-points-for-malware-detection-in-antivirus-test-74514/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2746003]We’ve just posted the following news: Microsoft Security Essentials scores zero points for malware detection in antivirus test[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2014/01/microsoft-security-essentials-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

            Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-security-essentials-scores-zero-points-for-malware-detection-in-antivirus-test-74514/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.[/QUOTE]

ugh…another German company testing MS software again…I think they have something against MS. Any test can be made to prove or disprove the numbers or results. I have MSE installed and it works just fine…what makes the difference is A/V is 50% the other 50% is the user themselves causing the infections clicking on links and going to sites that have malware/virus on them. I use a PC hosts file and that more the suffice to block malware/ads site from loading thus preventing infection if the user should click on it.


#3

Yes, it must be bias. It can’t be that it doesn’t work.


#4

It’s all a matter of baseline.
If I pick (the best) of any product, and then reference every product against it, every product fails.

At this point, every reputable AV software protects against 99.5% of viruses ever written, and 90% of common viruses on the internet, equating to 99.999999999%Â of viruses that any normal user would ever encounter, for common internet usage.

Now it’s a matter for the disreputable sites and AV software houses to duke it out, so that the remaining 0.0001% of the population that just have to get their pirate p8rn from disreputable websites maintain a clean system (software).

Sticky key jokes need not apply.


#5

I agree with coolcolors and have known for years that no AV software is foolproof. Any AV software is fine when kept updated, configured properly and, above all, used alongside rather than in place of responsible surfing. Thus, I’ve been using MSE since it launched and it’s never let me down. And since it’s free and doesn’t need to show off false positives to impress upon its customers how vigilant it is, means it’s perfect for the majority of users who don’t dabble in the darkest regions of the Internet.


#6

From what I can see, the Microsoft Security Essentials score is to be expected with the antivirus software coming preinstalled with Windows 8.1.

Basically, it does not make sense for Malware developers to release Malware they know is going to be caught by Windows’ own security software. Otherwise just about everyone relying on the default protection in Windows 8 is going to be immune to the infection. I’m sure it’s a similar story for many of the popular free products as it’s just a matter of the developers installing AVG, Avast, etc. on test machines and tweaking their Malware until it comes up clean before distributing it.

As I receive a fairly steady stream of viruses by e-mail, it is interesting to see what products catches them in VirusTotal. A few products appear to be checking the icon (e.g. executable with Adobe PDF or Ms Word icons) as a few now show “Fake Doc” as the result and many of the infections now are using blurry or slightly distorted icons as a result.

One security improvement I would like to see in Windows is it to always show file extensions of executable files, similar to how it always shows file extensions of unknown file times, regardless of the “Hide file extensions…” setting. It should also show a warning when opening executable files from a Zip file in the same way as opening a downloaded executable file.


#7

I keep saying this but in all systematic group tests Microsoft Security Essentials always does very badly.

People have a false impression of these sorts of things just because they haven’t come across anything that’s infected their system.

The only true test is exposure to viruses that are active current threats and it’s here that MSE always struggles.

I am a bit surprised that they rated it quite so lowly but it is IMO reflective of MSE’s general review performance so it’s not entirely unexpected.

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