Microsoft Security Essentials outperforms many paid antivirus scanners in latest AV-Test tests


#1

Microsoft Security Essentials impressed in the latest test of the well known German AV-Test. Microsoft’s free antivirus software performed better than many paid antivirus scanners and internet security suites.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-security-essentials-outperforms-many-paid-antivirus-scanners-latest-av-test-tests-81813/

#2

As uninteresting as these tests really are for the most, it is good to see a free alternative scoring high.

I’m personally more concerned about false positives where most scores high which is negative. Likewise, flagging legitimate tools from websites like nirsoft.net as ‘riskware’ only adds to the distrust I have in AV applications generally.
Not long ago we had a report where AV scanners intercepting https traffic were lowering the connection security and add to this that hijacking the entire AV for malicious activity has been successfully performed even recently and I have to ask myself if they are beneficial for security at all.

I guess they still are for the casual computer user and I still use Microsoft’s free alternative on some VMs, but for my main computer, there’s too much hassle even having an AV scanner installed, still I have way better security in place on that computer than on any other installation. I achieve that by a default outbound connection ‘block’ in my firewall, exploit and ransomware mitigations in the system, registry edits and extensive use of sandboxed environments. In other words, no AV necessary… At least none that taxes a portion of needed system resources and pops up false positive warnings on a larger percentage of the installed programs :wink:


#3

I use Malware Bytes n used it for a load of years. Don’t need any other.
Wonder why it’s not in that list.


#4

We like to say that but then again minds see otherwise. Using that same like.

I use MSE/Defender n used for a load of years. Don’t need any other. Wonder why it’s working now.


#5

When it comes to online scams, common sense often beats every “Internet Security” product out there.

To give a good example, I know of one Irish tourist website that has been infected since I checked a week ago (someone originally asked me after they had an awful experience trying to access the site). After having little luck contacting the webmaster, I submitted it to Google (Monday I think) so that it would be temporarily flagged until the webmaster gets it fixed.

Now about a week later, it remains showing up in Google search results as I check and it still redirects unsuspecting visitors to rogue websites, e.g. Fake infection alert pages, fake you’re today’s winner, etc. pages. Although I’ve MalwareBytes 3.0 running, not once did it block any of the pages each time I got redirected checking the website. Firefox did catch one redirection, bringing up the red “Deceptive website” warning page.

So a week later with this website redirecting unsuspecting tourists to rogue sites, only two products have flagged the website as malicious according to VirusTotal:

The webmaster came back to me a day ago, so hopefully they will get it cleaned. I also don’t want to name the site with the owner being just a short distance away. Feel free to PM me for it.


#6

LOL, I think that any registration for more than a year within the ‘ever changing’ realm of IT security may prove to be a bad one if you want to be best in class. Not that Malwarebytes is a bad choice, it’s just not the only solution. My point of course being that you find a mix of countermeasures that works in your scenario…for now, not tomorrow.


#7

I think “common sense” left long time ago. It’s their “responsibility” not mine is the excuses people are using instead. But at least with my hosts edit I can block redirects and popups from taking over my Browser. This gives me time to kill those popups since they can’t load their redirects. So again it’s not “common sense” it’s called being knowledgeable and taking responsibility for your “OWN” actions.


#8

With a hacked site, I’m not sure if a hosts file alone can block it. With the one I mentioned above, each time it redirects, it goes to a different domain, usually ending in ‘.top’.

I tried your hosts file (from 1st April), but still got redirected on that site:

If you would like, I can PM you the site. I’m surprised they haven’t cleaned it and whatever infection it has, Google hasn’t picked up on it.


#9

Sure PM me the site and I give it a try on IE, Edge, FF and it could also be related to the Browser as well. But I’ve give it a look and try. Can’t say I can block all sites but I block what I can find and do about them. Sometime I have to add the actuall URL site not just the **.domain.com but domain.domain.com the URL name to stop it from coming through. I do have a spot on my hots edits for myce hosts in the file for those that are found for those edits.


#10

My wife is so computer illiterate that she makes the cat look like an engineer, seriously. She uses Farcebork and clicks everything that is placed before her. I have installed a registered copy of Malwarebytes and MS Security Essentials and in the past 4.75 years has never been infected. So far the two “boys” have intercepted everything launched her way. I is very pleased with that. :+1: